Acetylene Lights

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Acetylene Lights
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 01:04 pm:

On my 1913 touring I am installing a new copper line running from the rubber tube at the carbide tank on the running board to the rubber tube connection on the left light
What is the proper routing of this metal line?
1. Does it run over or under the steering bracket?
2. Does it run over or under the starter that I have added to the car?
3. Does it run over or under the brake cross shaft?
How and where is the metal line attached to the underside or frame. Are there special clips
Thanks
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 02:37 pm:

Please be careful. I believe that no more than 65 percent of such tubing should be copper and that means that you should use high quality brass tubing as the original ones were made of and not copper. Prestolite reacts with the copper and makes it brittle and I believe that it also releases a blue powdery substance from the copper as it changes the composition of the pipe.

Brass tubing of a known percentage of copper is satisfactory and seamless steel tubing such as brake lines are made of is better.

Please talk to your bottled gas suppler for advice to be sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 02:45 pm:

Gary: There are two orignal '13s that have been in the news as of late. One is "barn find" on the forum. It may have the original gas line on it. I have an original '13 gas line in the garage, that did not come off my car. I'm willing to give you any information from that you will require. Phil Mino is also quite knowledgeable on the subject.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 02:47 pm:

Frank
I am actually reinstalling the brass tubing that I took off the car before restoration.It is very old and appears to be in good shape but I do not know the composition of the metal. I managed to purchase new red rubber from one of the parts suppliers.However I can not remember the actual routing of the tube and was seeking this information
Thank you sincerely for your advice re safety and composition.
Garry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 02:57 pm:

Take a file and drag it across the end of the tubing. That should tell you what it is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 03:02 pm:

On our 1913 Touring the red rubber tubing line came from our Prestolite tank and went up the joint where the fender meets the splash apron. From there it went along the inside left side of the frame in rubber and went into a Y where it split to the left head light with red rubber and through a brass tube which went under the radiator and turned out 90 degrees and went through the hole in the lower right side of the radiator lowere apron. At that point a red rubber tube then ran to the right head lamp. There were no clips as the pressure is less than one pound and the rubber slips on for about an inch. The rubber tubing was so stiff that it required no fastening.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers HB on Saturday, August 08, 2009 - 07:10 pm:

Acetylene and copper are not happy together like Frank says so use as little of it as possible and try for the brass or steel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, August 09, 2009 - 11:17 am:

I think the tubing I have has a stop soldered on each end to prevent the tubing from being slid on too far. It has one bracket attached to it, but there may have been another at one time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, August 09, 2009 - 05:14 pm:

I just measured the tubing I have. It is 44" long. The two stop sleeves are soldered in
1 5/8" from each end. The tubing has a seam, and is consistent with every brass gasoline line I've ever seen. It is either tin, or zinc plated. This line has one standard bracket attached to it with that square headed fine thread bolt with a cotter pin in it. I would assume it had another at one time, but don't know for sure. It is mostly straight, but has been bent over the years. It looks to me like it ran between the crankcase arm, and the hogshead. This line came off a very original April '13 touring, but it didn't not come off my car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Monday, August 10, 2009 - 07:06 pm:

Garry, I am the one that has the barn fresh 13 that was recently on the forum. I took some pictures of the gas line of my 13 for you. The clip that holds the line to the frame is held on by a square headed bolt and square nut, with a cotter pin going through the bolt. The line goes around the pan bracket and around the steering column. There is a picture of the T connection that I found in the muck on the engine pan. Hope this helps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Monday, August 10, 2009 - 08:10 pm:

Personally I wouldn't worry a bit about using copper or its alloy, brass, in the gas line as long as you clear the lines after use. Any acetylides that are formed during use will be carried off with the gas as it flows to the lamps, and burned there. But even if the gas remained in contact with the copper for awhile before being vented there'd be no problem. Think about it. The early generators were brass, and the gas stayed in them for awhile before being burned.

When you finish for the night, shut off the water, remove the hose at one end, venting the gas for a minute, then pull the hose off the other end and blow through it to clear it. This is also a good way to clear the water by-product.

Of course, keep sparks and flame away while you do this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garry Potter on Monday, August 10, 2009 - 10:50 pm:

Dan
Thank you. I will run my line as per your picture.
You are fortunate to have purchased such an interesting original T
Garry


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