Outside Engine Oil Line ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Outside Engine Oil Line ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Malcolm N Macleod on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 06:35 pm:

I am re building the engine of my 1924 Model T Bus (T.T. chassis) and wondering if I should fit an outside oil line and if so which one .
I live in the highlands of Scotland with plenty of hills.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern Ca. on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 08:17 pm:

Howdy Malcolm: The magneto post unit works fine and is easy to install and is available from many of the parts vendors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 08:17 pm:

I would suggest the High Volume Oil Line Kits that are sold by the suppliers. They are a little more work to put on because you have to put a hole in your hogshead and then mount a fitting to the hogshead and then put a hole in the oil pan and mount a fitting on the pan. You will get excellent oil flow to the front of the engine. I have installed this type on both of my engines and I'm happy with the results. I love to drive my cars in the hills and mountains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H on Sunday, November 08, 2009 - 08:37 am:

I use the magneto post oil line. Having pulled apart my engine due to a broken crankshaft, I found a piece of brass shim stuck in the oil funnel. I noticed the shim went missing about a year ago (it was a piece soldered onto the 3rd main to reduce end play).
So, if it wasn't for the external oil line all the bearings would have been ruined by now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Sunday, November 08, 2009 - 12:28 pm:

Aye Macleod,
An oil line I have installed and find it effective in the highlands of Southern California.
I also modified a fuel filter with brass fittings rather than hoses and clamps to serve as a viewing port. I can see the flow of oil.
It's the cheap kit, but the viewing port brought it up to the price of the expensive kit.
Works well though, Lad.
Robert Robb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Sunday, November 08, 2009 - 01:37 pm:

They don't all work. The ones that work are good, but the ones that don't are not worth having.
Only way to tell is to install it, disconnect the line at the front, start the engine and see how much, if any, oil comes out.
I know because I had one that didn't pass any oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Naquin on Sunday, November 08, 2009 - 11:37 pm:

Malcolm, the T is a 'wee sleekit cowrin' timrous beastie' and must of needs have oil to the front bearing if you plan to drive it far. Here in flat New Orleans, we think we only need the oil line for those trips up and across the Mississippi River Bridges. Best of luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, November 08, 2009 - 11:43 pm:

Malcolm, I have always thought that I would like to drive my T over the Rest and Be Thankful in Argyll, but distance prevents my doing so. I have the outside oil line that is sold by the vendors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 02:16 am:

Hi Malcolm, Welcome to the forum and the club! All the best with your bus restoration.
Do you have a Ruckstell on the rear differential?

Cheers
Adrian
(1226 TT flat deck)

(I have the external oil pipe - magneto post version - and it works well. Hilly New Zealand:-))


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 02:50 pm:

Lang's has an outsie oil line, #308206 for $24.95...Would this be okay for my '25 roadster? Only takes ten minutes to install...sounds awful easy after reading some of the above...thanks for your input, Flivver, Jack Rossi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 03:04 pm:

Lang's has an outside oil line, #308206 for $24.95...Would this be okay for my '25 roadster? Only takes ten minutes to install...sounds awful easy after reading some of the above...thanks for your input, Flivver, Jack Rossi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 07:42 pm:

Jack -- The number is 3082OL, and they work fine. I've used them on several T's without a problem. There are others available which will move more oil, but it appears that this one moves enough oil to protect your engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 07:43 pm:

I think the Lang's oiler is the one that replaces the magneto plug and the front bolt to the crankcase. It works very well and will save your engine if the inside oiler gets plugged. However a few things to check. Be sure it makes good contact with the magneto button. Sometimes they don't and then it won't run on magneto. I have adjusted for that problem but it takes more than ten minutes and takes a bit of doing to make it work. the other thing to check is to be sure you are actually getting oil through it. Run the engine with the line attached to the magneto plug but not attached to the crankcase and see if the oil flows. If it does, connect it up and it will be working. It should also be noted that you can also get lint in the magneto plug which will stop the oil flow. It is good to check once and a while to be sure you are getting oil to the front of the engine. This can be done by taking out one of the front screws from the inspection plate and start up the engine. Oil should run out freely if everything is working.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William P Schubert on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 08:00 pm:

I used a 1/2" hydraulic hose with a swivel and two 90's to connect the bendix cover to the front dip in the inspection cover. Works great and cost less than $25 from Tractor Supply.
Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 08:14 pm:

Two things I will add.

1. I would use the mag post oiler but modify with a small grinder the inside surfaces for max clearance and less obstructions to flow. I also added a small scoop to help guide oil into the mag post. I also do not like the restrictive bolt in the front of the engine oil line inlet typical of the mag post oilers. I put mine into an elbow through the front of the pan like the texas T outside oiler uses but with different hardware. now it has less restriction and steeper flow gradient. Mine flows very well.

2. I also use and recommend the auxiliary inside oil line mounted on the drivers side of the engine that is held in place by the inspection pan bolts. Easy to mount and now I have three sources of oil to the front of the engine. Now the rod scoops have plenty of oil to scoop up and splash around.

This has worked for me.

Erich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 08:35 pm:

Thanks to all you fellows, but how do I know if I have a magneto? Theere's no mag switch position on my ignition switch and no coil boxes...I am real new to this car and have lots of questions...Have had it a month and manuals haven't arrived yet....Flivver, Jack


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 08:53 pm:

Jack, does the engine have a distributor on it? If there is a battery, is it 6 volt or 12 volt?

These will help begin to identify how modified your car may be. Can you post any photos of the car?

Erich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 10:26 pm:

Yes Erich, I have a distributor, 12 volt battery, water pump, and a hot wire to the bus bar under voltage regulator that almost burned my finger off and the coil was hot also, till I
pulled the wires...now I am waiting for a friend with electical know how to show up and help me find the cause....I have a pull switch on dash in place of an ignition key and i wish to correct that when I get into the re-wiring of my dream boat....

JACK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 11:13 pm:

Jack, Save the fingers......Sounds like this has been modified a fair bit. What are your intentions for the car? Have fun, play around with it, go totaly back to stock, something in the middle? Glad you have a bud with electrical smarts. Every T guy needs one of those friends. I hope there is a person near you with T esperience. There is no substitute for experience and seeing it for yourself. I bet there is someone not far. Hey guys, who is in this part of Florida?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 11:24 pm:

Here's an oil flow viewing port fabricated from an in-line fuel filter that shows how much oil is going to the front of the engine.
veiwer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 11:33 pm:

Maybe now?
oil viewer


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Monday, November 30, 2009 - 11:14 am:

Erich,I am in contact with John Farr, with the Tin Lizzie Model T Club in The Villages, here in Florida...There are no Model T owners near me that I know of...Haven't been here long...Came up from Old Town on the river to evade the flood...Love it here in Branford area now...I'll send some pics to your e-mail address as I can't seem to handle the process to get them on this site...
Jack


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Monday, November 30, 2009 - 11:23 am:

Erich, I failed to answer your quesation...I plan to have fun with it while i bring it as close as I can in my tinkering moods...I am going on 83 and like to keep on keeping on...Selling my motorcycle 2004 Harley with sidecar and just keeping my Honda silver wing to run around on...Jay Leno feels the T is the perectcar and he drives his almost daily...so that is why I changed my direction to a T....An I aam so glad I did..This is one fascinating machine, built the year my parents were married at age 18.....
Jack


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, November 30, 2009 - 04:42 pm:

Jack,
It doesn't matter whether or not you have a distributor. Your car still has a Magneto plug at the top of the hogs head and you can use a magneto oiler on it.

Concerning the amount of flow. It is not necessary to have a large unrestricted flow of oil to the front of the engine. It is just necessary that you are getting enough oil to the front to replace what drains back to the sump. Most of the oil that is thrown up by the rods will drip back down into the dips in the pan and be re-used over and over, but some of it will overflow back into the sump especially when going uphill. You need enough oil to the front to replace that which is lost to the sump. Any excess oil will just flow back into the sump.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Monday, November 30, 2009 - 10:15 pm:

Malcomb; I built one using 1/2" copper tubing for the connections to the hardware that fastens to the engine.The first is the connection to the Mag post.

file


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 01:50 pm:

Malcomb; I tried to post two pictures on the post above, however my smarts got way ahead of my abilities. The brite bolt on the left side is connecting a strap iron brace to one of the starter bolts. This next picture shows the connection to the pan. in between is an 18" length of vinyl tubing. Cold @ idle, it takes about 2 seconds for a bubble to travel the length. At first, the tubing was only about 1/3 full. I welded a shaped 3/8" pipe to a washer, and sandwiched it between two gaskets.

file


Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael J McCrary on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 07:30 pm:

throw the copper tubing away and double clamp good heavy clear hose on and you can always tell it's working


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