Clincher Tire vs garbage bag

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Clincher Tire vs garbage bag
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Marshall on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 06:23 pm:

Hi,
I'm trying the the garbage bag trick over a clincher rim for installing new tires..

Wondering if I am not doing it right, practiced on an old rim, does not seem that much easier, still had to pry the tire over the rim at the end.....and how do you get get the bag out from between the rim and the tire.....?
I ended up with pieces of bag sticking out........ :-)

Thanks
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 06:44 pm:

I've done 8 tires now with the "bag" trick. It made it much easier, although the 28 inch and 30 by 3 tires were still tougher than the 30 by 3 1/2.

I also put the tires out in the sun for several hours during the summer, and this made them more pliable.

Pulling the plastic out wasn't easy, but most of it came out after deflating the tire on the rim, and pushing the side walls in as I pulled the plastic out. I still see "threads" of plastic once in a while, and pull them off.

Good luck,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Shelton on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 08:04 pm:

I remounted 4 old 30x3.5 ties with the method and found it worked pretty well. But I did end up with little pieces of bag (very small) left.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Jamison on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 08:08 pm:

Here's a video I made of the process. This one had a couple pieces I took out, but the other three bags come out in one piece... and these were thin cheapie bags.

Phil

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6sH8WRl6yI


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 10:26 pm:

That is to good to believe. I wish I had seen this a few weeks sooner.

Because no tire irons are used, does it eliminate the need for flaps?


Erich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Marshall on Sunday, November 29, 2009 - 11:46 pm:

Thanks for the video !
I was doing a 30 X 3, and used the higher quality, thicker mil bags !
I'm re-painting my rims, so trying to avoid chipping them when I install the new tires, if there is a better idea, I would sure appreciate hearing it....
Thanks
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Von Nordheim on Monday, November 30, 2009 - 01:32 am:

Dave,
Besides getting the tires warm using the sun and a trash bag, I also use baby powder talc. I coat the tire inside, bead, tube and flap including my self with lots of talc. The talc makes it much easier for the tire to slide over the rim. I have installed several sets of new tires on clincher rims using the above techniques with out using tire irons. I prefer leaving the wheels on the car when installing tires.....that way you have some leverage and can use both hands and feet in pushing/streaching the tire over the rim.
If you must resort to using tire irons, place some rubber sheet material between the iron and rim to avoid chiping paint.
A friend made a tire streacher by cutting an old rim in half. Laying the tire down, place each rim half in place and using a jack streach the tire. After leaving it in the sun for an hour or two, release the jack pressure and rotate the rim halfs and streach the tire in the other direction and leave it for a while. After you have streached the tire in both directions, quickly install the tire. This method normally works when the tire just seems to small to fit the rim but is the correct size.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Monday, November 30, 2009 - 08:29 am:

Like Les says, leave the wheels on the car it is much easier. Next house I move to permanently I am going to make a wheel holder that will support a Model T front or rear wheel at waist height just for the purpose of tire changing.

I've had great success using GoJo brand hand cleaner to lubricate clincher tires before mounting. Never tried a garbage bag because frankly it is very easy already. Tire tools are not needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Marshall on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 12:22 am:

Guys,
It's winter here in Kansas ! if I leave them out they will get hard & freeeze ! :-)
Guess if I can get the boss lady out of the house I can borrow her clothes dryer !
Thanks all
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill leahy on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 10:17 am:

1909

4 in 1 1/2 hrs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hitchcock on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 06:23 pm:

Great Idea!!! Additional thought. How do you get the tires off without using tire irons? Such as fixing a flat tire??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 07:57 pm:

David,

I have not been able to get tires off without using tire irons. If I build a fixture for holding the wheel at waist level it might be possible provided the tire was soft and you had some help.

Typically when I am removing a tire it is hard as a rock and / or worn out. In that case cutting the tire with a hacksaw blade makes it very easy and you don't hurt the wheel finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - 08:44 pm:

Bill are those McLaren wheels?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hitchcock on Wednesday, December 02, 2009 - 12:13 pm:

Thanks for your comment Royce. In the case of a flat, do you then just work the bead to the center of the wheel and then work the tube out underneath the bead?
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bill leahy on Wednesday, December 02, 2009 - 12:54 pm:

john,
yes the wheels are mclaren. the caps were made on a cnc machine.

bill
1909


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Wednesday, December 02, 2009 - 09:08 pm:

David,

I have had very few flats, in fact just two that I can remember. One was a completely worn out tire that had a blowout. It was a 50 year old tire and I cut it off with a saw.

The other was one of the front tires on my '15 touring. The tube was leaking around the valve stem, the tire was only 4 or so years old. I had to use tire tools to get it off. I removed the tire completely and partially inflated the new tube (as always), then installed the tire on the wheels without any tools, again as always.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 09:36 pm:

My dear old dad who would be 101 and some change today, used to say a good mechanic needs only a hammer to change a Ford tire!

And he could do it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 09:46 pm:

Royce, Do you suppose it is possible that maybe the Gojo Hand Cleaner you use to lubricate your tires maybe rotted that tube and caused it to leak around the valve stem? Just a thought.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, December 05, 2009 - 04:11 am:

Seems like I heard years ago that using soap was supposed to be bad for the tubes. Any thoughts on that? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Saturday, December 05, 2009 - 11:25 am:

There are a lot of things that are not good for rubber. It is not indestructable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nicholas Lingg on Saturday, December 05, 2009 - 12:04 pm:

I've got a question! Won't anything used to lube the tires cause them to slip in the rim?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, December 05, 2009 - 02:57 pm:

Nicholas, not if they have the correct air pressure. I use talcum powder and haven't had a problem yet. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce Peterson on Saturday, December 05, 2009 - 11:39 pm:

Nicholas,

If you use Go Jo hand cleaner you will find that it disappears in a few minutes. Talc on the other hand will be there when you remove the tire years later. In either case it does not seem to make any difference.


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