A workshop in 1916

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: A workshop in 1916
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, December 03, 2009 - 10:56 pm:

This is fascinating! Sorry it's non Ford but repreents the times, although I bet Henry would have kept it neater.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/7111#comments

I especially like the door handle on the right side of the picture, it sort'a frames the image, like you are being given a peek into the room.
There is another picture from the same establishment that you can see by clicking on the "another view here" spot
Wouldn't you like to be there also?

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, December 03, 2009 - 11:58 pm:

Thanks Herb!! In my years with Chevy and later Olds the beltwork was always part of the Millwright Trade.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner on Thursday, December 03, 2009 - 11:59 pm:

I thought the gas lighting was interesting.

George n L.A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 12:43 am:

z

Here's what I got for $5 at an auction last weekend. So I'm on my way to having my own 1916 shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls,WI on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 09:08 am:

All you need now are some leather belts to run overhead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 10:13 am:

I wonder if it was powered by steam or a large Hit & Miss engine...I was thinking maybe the big tank on the end of the shop might have been part of a steam operation but I'm not sure.Steam would had given a more constent smooth power with out having to shut down and refuel an engine. There are two big wheels that may have been the main power outputs to the transmission lines. Very nice photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew K. Deckman on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 12:14 pm:

I have a friend that has a overhead drive system that he powers with one of six steam engines both vertical and horizontal. I used to run them when I was a kid in the 80's. what fun. he is the resaon I now own a T. He has many classic cars and firetrucks. I may get some photos to put on here if it is okay with you all. They are NON T though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 12:47 pm:

I think the tank in the photo is a receiver for compressed air. I believe the compressor is just beside it behind the crates and is belt driven off the line shaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 01:21 pm:

I would imagine that by 1916 the power would be from a large electric motor. By that time electric power had been in general use for thirty years. Steam was still used in locomotives, farm traction engines, some construction equipment, and a few cars, but petrol and diesel were taking over for most non-stationary uses except railroads, and electric power was most common for stationary uses except in rural areas. Obviously steam, and even direct water power, were still being used in some old establishments, but probably not in a new industry like the auto business.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Sunday, December 06, 2009 - 02:21 pm:

How well I remember the overhead systems, common in the day. One town in particular had two Blacksmith shops, one was pretty good sized, one was pretty small, but he did the babbit work on cars, windmills and etc. A lot of both's work was agricultural, sharpening plow points with trip hammers was fun to watch. At the time, late 30's - early 40's, I am pretty sure the main jack shaft was turned by electric motors, don't remember steam or internal combustion engines being used for that. It was amazing how they had all those belts and pulleys figured out. I don't remember an electric welding machine used by either shop, the welding that I saw done was the old time blacksmith flame welding, both of my Grand Dads did this on the place in their small farm shops. We had one of the large leather bellows in my Maternal Grand Dad's. Lots of history gone and forgotten.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 09:39 am:

Here is another view inside a shop with the line shafts

Herb

http://cgi.ebay.com/RPPC-Interior-of-Garage-Machine-Shop-Bryn-Mawr-PA-OLD_W0QQit emZ400057838157QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item5d254e2a4d


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