Totally off topic - Piper Cherokee

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Totally off topic - Piper Cherokee
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vince M on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 01:44 pm:

Does anyone know of any cool books on the 1969 Cherokee, or maybe some special wax or care product that is used on these planes? I know nothing about these but i am looking for a small Christmas gift for the brother-in-law who just retired. His plane is his model "T". I noticed there were many of you here that are into small planes. Sorry to take up bandwidth on something so off topic.

Thanks

Vince M


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Burch on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 02:27 pm:

Sporty's Pilot Shop in Batavia OH has what you are looking for. 1-800-sportys or www.sportys.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 03:58 pm:

Rick is right on the money. When a buddy of mine acquired an antique airplane, I got him a set of personalized wheel chocks from Sporty's, but they have a ton of great gift ideas for pilots and aircraft owners.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dennie kirkpatrick on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 05:00 pm:

I didn't know Piper made a mode T? Ha Ha! I learned to fly in a 1947 Luscombe Silvair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 08:49 pm:

Also, www.AircraftSpruce.com

Maybe he'd like a bucket of propwash..

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 08:51 pm:

Seriously, the book "Stick and Rudder" is excellent. It's WWII era on the basics of flying.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 08:58 pm:

Dennie; I soloed in a Curtiss Jr. It was a parasol wing, with a 3 cyl Szekely radial engine. No brakes, and a tail skid. Flat out was about 55 MPH.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randall Schultz-Rathbun on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 09:22 pm:

Vince, we use a product called Aeroglaze (Sporty's sells it) on our helicopters where I work. It's a dry wash; we use it to clean the aircraft and it works great, leaves a fantastic shine, and it even takes the jet-exhaust soot off (nothing else gets rid of that sooty stuff). Doesn't harm the paint, and leaves a protective coating on it. It's just like waxing your car; rub-on, buff off. It's the best aircraft cleaner I've ever used. I'm going to try it on the T if it ever warms up around here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gordon Byers on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 10:13 pm:

As long as we are off T's and on airplanes, thought the following terms might be of interest.

AIRSPEED - Speed of an airplane. (Deduct 25% when listening to a
retired fighter pilot).
BANK - The folks who hold the lien on most pilots' cars.
CARBURETOR ICING - A phenomenon reported to the FAA by pilots
immediately after they run out of gas.
CONE OF CONFUSION - An area about the size of New Jersey located
near the final approach beacon at an airport.
CRAB - A VFR Instructor's attitude on an IFR day.
DEAD RECKONING - You reckon correctly, or you are.
DESTINATION - Geographical location 30 minutes beyond the pilot's
bladder saturation point.
ENGINE FAILURE - A condition that occurs when all fuel tanks
mysteriously become filled with low-octane air.
FIREWALL - Section of the aircraft specifically designed to funnel
heat and smoke into the cockpit.
FLIGHT FOLLOWING - USAF Formation flying.
GLIDE DISTANCE - Half the distance from an airplane to the nearest
emergency landing field.
HOBBS - An instrument which creates an emergency situation should it
fail during dual instruction.
HYDROPLANE - An airplane designed to land long on a short and wet
runway.
IFR - A method of flying by needle and horoscope.
LEAN MIXTURE - Nonalcoholic beer.
MINI MAG LITE - Device designed to support the AA battery industry.
NANOSECOND - Time delay between the Low Fuel Warning light and the
onset of carburetor icing.
PARACHUTES - The two chutes in a Stearman.
PARASITIC DRAG - A pilot who bums a ride and complains about the
service.
RANGE - Usually about 3 miles short of the destination.
RICH MIXTURE - What you order at another pilot's promotion party.
ROGER - Used when you're not sure what else to say.
SECTIONAL CHART - Any chart that ends 25 nm short of your
destination.
SERVICE CEILING - Altitude at which cabin crew can serve drinks.
SPOILERS - FAA Inspectors.
STALL - Technique used to explain to the bank why your car payment
is late.
STEEP BANKS - Banks that charge pilots more than 10% interest.
TURN & BANK INDICATOR - An instrument largely ignored by pilots.
USEFUL LOAD - Volumetric capacity of the aircraft, disregarding
weight.
VOR - Radio navigation aid, named after the VORtex effect on pilots
trying to home in on it.
WAC CHART - Directions to the Army female barracks.
YANKEE - Any pilot who has to ask New Orleans tower to "Say again".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vince M on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 10:38 pm:

I knew you guys would come through. Thanks very much!
Vince M


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 10:56 pm:

A framed copy of the poem, "High Flight" is always prized.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 11:23 pm:

Gordon,

I really enjoyed, and laughed at your list. The last one was the best. I was raised in Central Texas and have heard another definition of "Yankee" but I cannot post it on this forum. Any of you who have a sense of humor can send me a PM and I will let you in on the Texas defination of a Yankee.

Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III on Thursday, December 10, 2009 - 11:55 pm:

Just wondering how any aviators are owners of model Ts, I got my shirttail cut in a Polish P38 (ercoupe 415) Here's what one looks like

a

later in life the USMC let me play with a Harrier D


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 01:05 am:

Cessna 150, Piper Tri-Pacer, Cessna 150M, Piper Pacer with tundra/taildragger conversion, droop tips, O-360, STOL kit. Haven't flown as pilot for about 15 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 01:38 am:

4000 hours in my old ragwing Cessna 170.
Built a radial engined biplane from scratch.
Many others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:09 am:

How you know you've got the Cincinnati Tower:
Instead of asking "Say Again" the request is; "Please?"
T'
David D.
With no disrespect to folks from Cincinnati!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 08:02 am:

In about '70 or '71 I had a nice ride in a Helio-Corrier STOL...The pilot was demonstrating what the aircraft would do. Well he showed us just how to evacuate a totaled aircraft...As he made a low pass we hit the runway skidded off to the side took out about two acres of corn, several fences, and stopped about 15 feet from a farmers barn. The two week old plane was totaled but all 6 of us walked away...OK we kinda ran from the aircraft as fuel poured out over the engine and fuse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 08:11 am:

My plan is after I get done with the studying and pass my Extra class for Ham radio is to start my pilot training,,,But Iím not sure if I can pass the medical.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gordon Byers on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 09:24 am:

John, I took my first ride with a family friend in an Ercoupe in '46. This sparked my interest in aviation and I got my ticket in '62, SEL, MEL. Soloed in a C140 and then took my flight check in a C170. Later years went into the 182 with some time in a 210 and 310. Don't have a plane or fly much anymore though, still enjoy it but have other interests now and since retirement don't have the need to get anywhere in a hurry.
Gordon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harvey Decker on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 09:47 am:

This is a close as I ever got to owning my own aircraft?
airplane


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harvey Decker on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 09:52 am:

OK, another try?
pedal plane


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 10:47 am:

I know that I shouldn't do this, but I just can't help myself:

If you love flying and old airplanes and historical/action stories, read The Golden Scimitar by R.E. Robb available at Amazon.com, OK?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 11:34 am:

Guys I don't fly either, but have my own airport here on the farm, presently leased to the Fulton Ultralight assoc. they have 6 hangers here on my farm, and 14-16 planes, we have the old govt tower w/ light on top (not working) and sock on top of that, 2-1800 foot sod strips, they keep it rolled and mowed, and I get to enjoy all kinds of friends that hanger here and else where flying in and out, bussing the house etc. Kind of fun, the light and my dads old hanger ( now a T parts building on the south, 2 silos on the North end, golf coarse and trees on east end, High power line that feeds Fulton Mo on the west end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:21 pm:

learned to drive a 150 and a 152. Then moved to a Cherokee six with Loran, kinda nice when on unicom. Worked for RAJAY turbochargers in the 60's turbonormalizing lots of private airplanes, Cessnas, Pipers, Lake amphibian, Brantly helo, Britton Norman Islander and Tri-Islanader, Dehavaland Heron and Dove, Aero-Commander 500 A and B, Darringer twin, Mooney, Beachcraft, Ford Pinto and aircoold V W. Illustrated all parts books and tech wrote manuals. Did Installation drawings for all. Hired one of my students to replace me when I went into College administration. Worked on the GAF-Hawk 125 PT6 powered single engined freighter with 70 foot wing span and 50 foot long body. Could take off with a pickup truck loaded with bricks in 1600 feet. t


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel Keefer on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:38 pm:

But, Cheeze, you gotta admit that looking at the GAF takes some getting used to .

The '69 Cherokee is a fine plane. It is an easy keeper. Hope the HP is as desired. No 140 HP in Denver.

Had a '68 Cherokee Arrow, (retractable w/CS prop), for 14 years and 1400 hours. Loved it.

Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 01:40 pm:

What kind of plane is that, Bob Robb? I don't do Amazon. Is it available from Barney?

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:01 pm:

The story is based on three ex-Air Force guys finding an underground ME.262 assembly plant undiscovered since WWII.
There are three brand-new Me.262s in there and their plan is to fly them out of there to England without the German government knowing it.
Might be available at Barnes and Noble, but I don't know for sure. Look for The Golden Scimitar by R.E. Robb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 12:39 am:

Some guys just want to have fun.

http://www.franklinairshow.com/Video/Comedy%202010%20Net.WMV


Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 12:46 am:

Wore out two Mooneys and had a Twin Comanche in between. Had lots of time in a B model Aztec. Have landed in all the lower 48 except Vermont and North Dakota. I had the Super 21 out of the state of California in '81 for about 9 of the 12 months.

Sincerely

Jim Weir, CSMEL, Instrument.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 02:47 am:

Herb, that's a classic airshow routine which used to be known as "The Flying Farmer." I think the gang up at Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome originated that act. This guy improved on it quite a bit and worked within some really close margins. I've flown some aerobatics in a Citabria, but never anything as wild as that.

I started flying in a Cessna 152, then trained on Grumman-American Cheetahs and Tigers, got my license in a Piper Archer, grabbed an hour in a Piper Arrow to get a little retract time in my log before buying a Navion. Along the way, I got to fly some really cool airplanes including a T-6 and I rode as a passenger in a B-25, but the crowning glory was back in '87, when I got a ride in the jumpseat of Ray Stutsman's P-47 Thunderbolt! Definitely one of the top ten hi-lites of my life.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 11:56 am:

Learned in a Cherokee, then flew Arrows, Bonanzas and got multi time in a Baron. Worked at the National Warplane Museum for a number of months between Grad school and first real job and got some log time in a BT-13 and their B-17. Also got to taxi their PBY a bit, and got to ride jumpseat in a P-40 once.

I grew up around airplanes and the airlines - my dad was the first employee of a little post-WWII venture that went on to become Jeppesen and Co. ('ol Mr. Jepp and his wife Nadine were my honorary grandparents growing up). Dad retired as President just before the sale to Boeing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ivan Warrington on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 09:45 am:

Owned a Twin Comanche for about 30 years. Best airplane ever built. Safe, fast, comfortable. Had all the speed mods, cruised about 200 mph on 13 gallons per hour.

I love StarBrite polish with Teflon (marine). Used it on the props, and fuselage bugs just slid off.

Funny, I felt safer in the Comanche than I do in the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marc Roberts on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 12:04 am:

Between Model T rides and repairs, I am restoring a Waco UPF-7. Early Wacos (and I believe some others) used a few parts here and there borrowed from Model T's and Model A's. Part of the flight control linkage in the Waco 9, for example, is made from a drag link of a Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Balough on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 05:10 pm:

I thought you might like to see what competes with my Model T's time. I don't use a wax just a good clear coat when painted back in 89. By the way, for non-pilots she's a Navionbarber6


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 06:35 pm:

Had a great "job" flying this

TWA727
and flew this one for awhile
TWA747
but my favorite, and the one I flew the longest before retirement was the L-10ll. Just a great machine....and a wonderful profession in the 70's and 80's.
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 08:08 pm:

Bruce, I have a Navion too. Ain't never flown anything that handles nicer.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Dizer on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 09:20 pm:

For those of you with an interest, the FAA has had for a few years the sport plane pilots license. It takes about half the hours of a regular license, and the only medical requirement is a drivers license, and that you have never been turned down for a regular FAA medical. You are limited to light planes,2 people, daytime only and no large airports. There are a long list of approved regular aircraft as well as homebuilts etc. My early ercoupe 415c is one of them. If you already have your license but have not flown for a while, a biennial review is all you should need. Google EAA sportplane should bring up lots of information


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 10:53 am:

Dave, when were you flying those? I wonder if my daughter was ever one of your FA's...

Her favorite bumper sticker was, "The flight attendant's job is to save your a**, not kiss it!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 11:01 am:

'66 thru '92.
All the F/A's I ever met were well trained, energetic, very attentive and caring for the passengers and did an all around super job. Things changed even before our current president took office....I don't think for the better, but I'm sure others have a different feeling.
Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 11:22 am:

Then she was after your time. Started (as I recall) in '96 or '97 and flew for three years. Hers was the last class before a hiring freeze, so she never gained any seniority and got tired of being on standby all the time.

I love some of her stories. I forget whether they had Coke or Pepsi products, but whichever it was, one passenger wanted the other. Elisabeth kept explaining what they had, and the woman kept insisting. She said, "You mean I can't get a XXX?" Elisabeth finally said, "No, Ma'am. This is a 1011, not a 7-11."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 11:46 am:

Don't know why, but Pepsi had the TWA franchise as I remember.
Yes, there were a few disgruntled folks ... just like the folks years ago who wanted an auto color other than black. Funny how we humans want things we cannot have, isn't it?

Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sven Jakobsson on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 05:18 pm:

I never owned an airplane of my own, but I have flown SAAB Safir, DeHavilland Vampire, Cessna 172 and 152. Now low and slow in a Turing -26.
Best regards/Sven


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 05:25 pm:

Downloaded clip and it will not play. Updated viewer and already had the newest one. Why will it not play ? It states I have it as a file but there is no content in the file other than the title and about 6 bits should be in the megs ?

Sent it to myself as an attachment and still no information, what gives ?


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