A few questions you can probably answer in your sleep!

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: A few questions you can probably answer in your sleep!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:00 pm:

So, my car has finally arrived, and is happily in the garage. The car is a 1926 Coupe, Canadian.
I have lots of questions of course, many of which will no doubt be answered my the MTFCA books I am ordering, but I have a few I would like some answers on, before I make my parts order, so I order the right things, and so I can go for a little drive, even if just around the block, before the parts get here.

The Coupe has been sitting for years, and the oil that came out was really ugly. I have to say, I've never drained oil that looked like that!

I am going to be ordering carb bits, needle and seat, spray nozzle, etc.

My questions are: ( and I bet they are all easy answers)

How difficult is it to drill a drain plug into the differential housing? Where abouts are they usually drilled?

The front and rear spring shackles have been fitted with grease zerks. I'd like to change 'em back to flip top oil caps. Will this be a can of worms now that they are threaded for the zerks?

My fan pulley also has a grease zerk on it, what should there be there?

Where can I buy some sweet looking plug wires? I see Lang's sells the wire by the foot, where do I get ends?

In the box of parts I found four Champion X plugs. Some fool in the past, has clipped the side contacts a bit short. Can I weld a piece of fine welding rod in place? Can I get the gaskets for these? Or, do they go on the shelf?

The car is stuck in gear. It will go into low with the pedal pushed down, but as the pedal comes up, it goes right into high. The parking brake lever does move the Hi-Lo pedal, and will apply the rear brakes when all the way back.

I would imagine that everything is just out of adjustment. Until the books get here, what's the best way to adjust the bands and such? I can't seem to find anything online about doing this.

From reading here, it seems like, if I have cotton bands, they will be toast from sitting in the oil nasty acidic oil. If so, what tools do I really need to change the bands? I see there are those wrenches chained to the big square looking thing, and I see there is a sort of cheater curled up steel with handle looking thing. What do you really need?

I know I should just wait for the books. But I live in a geographical oddity, two weeks from everywhere. I am too excited to wait!

Thanks everybody!
Christopher Lang


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew K. Deckman on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:11 pm:

Your high low problem is not a problem thats how it is supposed to work! nutral is the hand brake in the middle. all the way back is the parking brake.
all the way forward is high
Try using you bands before replacing them they still may be good!!
They should have ready made plug wires as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:19 pm:

There is no neutral between low and high.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:19 pm:

I'm sure there are other T owners on Vancouver Island, but don't know them. I think one of them sells on tbay. Search for Model T parts, with Distance, closest first, and you may be surprised.

I use the wench chained to the C. It keeps you from dropping a nut or washer into the bottom. I would try driving it first, however.

b

b2

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:29 pm:

Christopher,
You are asking the ususal new guy questions. Although the forum is a wealth of knowledge, this is not the way to learn to drive or repair your T, you need a local T person to take you uner his wing. Check for a local chapter of the MTFCA or MTFCI.

Right now, the less you touch or modify/repair, the fewer the variables, so start with what you have, change the oil and gas but nothing else. Get a Ford Service Manual as a minimum befor doing anything. Read it and try to follow the Ford method and refrain from all those great new guy ideas like drilling a hole to drain the differential oil. Some things should not be tinkered with without the proper tools and experience like the coils.

For now dont worry about zerk fittings, except if you have them pump grease into them.

Dont replace the band linings or start adjusting them just yet.

The left pedal has three positions, low, high and somewhere in the middle is neutral. Pulling the hand brake should bring the pedal to the mid range for neutral, you do this by guessing with your foot when you drive.

Just sitting for a few years is not a reason to expect that everything needs to be rebuilt or is out of adjustment, start with checking the ignition system for spark, then fuel system, etc. A good cleaning may be all the carb needs.

Welcome to the hobby.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:43 pm:

I agree, No substitute for an experienced eye first hand. If the carb is cleaned and there is not a bunch of jelly or rust in the tank, it may work. One thing that may be bad is the coils. If they are not functioning well, it won't run. Are you sure the rear diff has no drain plug? Even in Canada, there should be one.

Congrats. Post a pic ASAP

Erich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 12:51 pm:

I would add one thing to what Jeff said. Change the coolant in the radiator. Use a 50-50 mixture of antifreeze and distilled water. Every time you add coolant add the 50-50 or at least distilled water.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 01:29 pm:

As for your spark plugs, the electrodes on Champion X's will be shorter than your modern garden variety plugs. They actually spark from the side of the center electrode over to the side electrode. The side electrode is not supposed to come down under the center electrode like a modern plug. The side electrode is supposed to have a slight "V" shape to it so excess oil/gas can drip from that point rather than the end of it. Someone else may have a photo handy to post to show you what I'm talking about. In short, I bet your plugs have not been clipped off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 02:55 pm:

By all means, wait for the books and when you receive them study the books thoroughly and familiarize yourself with the Model T before diving in. Before working on any system, use the books and read about the procedure you are about to embark on before starting. It should answer any questions you have, but if you are still unclear come back and ask. The more you know about the Model T, the better you are able to describe the problem you are having. If there is any one project in which Mr. Murphy pops up his ugly head, it is on just about anything you do on the Model T.

The 4 books that are the most help to me are: The Model T Ford Service Manual, #BT-1; Model T Ford Service Bulletin Essentials, BP-7; Model T Ford Restoration Handbook, BC-18; Model T Scrapbook, BC-5. The numbers are from the Snyder's catalog.

Take plenty of pictures before you start and document your progress not only to reminisce over when you finish, but to refer to when you go to reassemble the thing.

If you are doing a full restoration, it may be a year or two before you start putting it back together and by then your memory may deceive you as to what goes where, so be sure to keep plenty of boxes and ziplock sandwich bags on hand so as to store the bolts and nuts, cotter pins, screws and small parts in and label each bag as to where the contents came from with a Magic Marker such as, "head bolts"; "Engine block to pan bolts"; Drive shaft to Hogshead bolts"; Right front Fender to running board", etc. Only put the bolts that go to a certain part in one bag and label with a magic marker. If there are several different sized bolts on the same part, use several ziplock bags and explain with your magic marker. Organize the bags from certain systems in the boxes and label.

Also, use masking tape to stick to various points to remind yourself of where something went and make drawings. This is especially helpful as you are removing the wiring harnesses from various components and on the wheels.

The differential does not need a drain plug. It already has a fill plug. The oil needs to be either sucked out with a suction gun or emptied out at the time you rebuild it by either tilting it so the oil drains out or when you separate the halves of the pumpkin. The differential oil is 600 weight and very thick and slow moving.

Geographical oddity? LOL! Sounds like you live near that store in "Oh Brother..." www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tw_YryVgLOg

Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:05 pm:

Christopher,
Neutral is with the pedal midway between high and low. You can set it in neutral to push it around the garage by releasing the parking brake only about 1/3rd of the way, that will keep the pedal in neutral and also release the parking brake, but the T does not have a free wheeling neutral like a modern stick shift so do not attempt to tow it or you will damage the engine and transmission.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:06 pm:

Christopher, your clutch discs may be stuck together, not allowing for neutral. Was the emergency brake handle left forward when stored? If so, that couild be the problem. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:29 pm:

You can lift the the floorboards and study the mechanism. The big cam disengages the clutch.

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Francisco da Costa on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:36 pm:

HI: Christopher i live in coquitlam, bc call me @ 604-312-7890 i have a 26 touring


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:39 pm:

I agree with everybody, My money would be finding someone that know about model T's to give you a short lesson. When I first got mine I darn near drove it though the back wall of my garage. The next trip went much better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vince M on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:46 pm:

Do a bit of reading first, then give it try in an open area. Its nice to have someone there to show you, but in the absense of that just go for it. I did.

Vince M


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 03:56 pm:

This is my oldest nephew. It's not his, but is in a collection near Roche Harbor on San Juan Island.

jim

rdr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel (Indiana Trucks) on Friday, December 11, 2009 - 10:36 pm:

As for no neutral, I would change your oil and if it is real bad you could remove the bottom of the pan and clean out the 4 dips that will have a lot of trash in them as well. Then jack up the rear and block the front and let the rear wheels spin. After you get it to start and it warms up some the clutches will start to work free and you can pull the brake back to slow and then stop the wheels. If you can do that you have your neutral and should be able to let the car down but don't let it down while it is running or it might take off without you! This is how I got mine going 2 years ago after a 42 year nap. The bands will fall appart after your first couple of drives if they are going to do anything. I was able to change mine through the inspection cover with a small rope tied to the end with the one end removed. This let me pull it back in place when I put it together. Only took a day start to finish and I am slow and never did it before.

Good luck and have fun
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 12:03 pm:

Christopher,

Ditto what others have shared – be sure to have a local T person give you a hand and some pointers – it will save you lots or unnecessary work.

You shared: “The Coupe has been sitting for years, and the oil that came out was really ugly. I have to say, I've never drained oil that looked like that!”

Others recommended and I agree – you probably want to drop the inspection plate on the oil pan and remove sludge from the depressions where the rods pass through. Our 1915 had not had the oil changed in years (bad drain plug so they just kept adding oil). It had what looked like a thin wheel bearing grease built up about an inch thick on the lower inside of the engine pan. You could see the trough where the connecting rods went through the “goo” and if was a perfect scraping – i.e. lower in the middle with two higher ridges and then two more higher ridges were the connecting rod rotated through. A putty knife etc. can be used to remove lots of that sort of stuff. And in our case we fixed the drain plug and sprayed the inside of the engine with kerosene to help flush out all the “goo” we could get to. Then we replaced the inspection plate and added kerosene and ran it at low power for about a minute, shut it off and drained it out. We drained and refilled with kerosene several times before the gray colored kerosene finally started to look more clear than solid really gray. Then we added oil, ran it till hot and drained and refilled with fresh oil. There was a lot of “goo” in our engine -- probably more than most just because the oil plug was not working. But something you may want to check in your car.

You may find that this may help your clutch situation also – as “goo” between the clutch plates tends to make the clutch drag.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 12:07 pm:

Christopher, there are lots of guys around Vancouver and Coquitham (sp?) I've sold parts to some guys up there over the years. It shouldn't be too hard to find somebody to give you a hand. That said, just fire it up and start pushing pedals and see what happens. It's not that hard to drive a T and you can always shut it off just before you hit something.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 03:51 pm:

Christopher,

1. You shared: “The car is stuck in gear. It will go into low with the pedal pushed down, but as the pedal comes up, it goes right into high. The parking brake lever does move the Hi-Lo pedal, and will apply the rear brakes when all the way back.

2. How do you know the car will go into “low gear”? I.e. if it isn’t running are you having someone turn the crank handle and/or using the starter and seeing that the jacked up rear wheel turns fewer times for one complete turn of the engine hand crank than when the pedal is released?

3. If it will go into low using the foot pedal and out of high as it goes into low then it could be:

3.a. As simple as cleaning the old thick oil out. Straight 30 wt oil in a cold climate makes the car appear to stay in high gear. You can even have fun with that. Crank the cold car in neutral, without any chocks (be sure it is pointed towards a clear area) and when the engine catches it will start moving forward. Jump on the running board and climb in. Note – this was a really dumb idea – but I used to love to demo that when I was a teenager – bullet proof and knew everything. As the car started forward I would jump on the running board, climb over the fake door on our USA touring body and drive away. Back then I didn’t have to worry about missing the jump and watching the car drive off into the distance – now days – that might be more of a probability.

3.b. Or something may be out of adjustment. If it goes into low and out of high when you push down the pedal, there is a good chance you can turn the bolt that rides on the emergency brake cam and get the car to be in neutral with the brake handle pulled about 2/3 of the way back. I.e. the bolt goes up on the cam. Below is an explanation from the “Ford Service” which was recommend to you in one of the postings above. It is also one of the items include on Bruce McCalley’s “Model T Comprehensive Encyclopedia” [ http://mtfca.com/encyclo/mccalley.htm ]

1

2

3

And thanks to Ken Kopsky who posted the image below explaining the clearance that is wanted.

4

And I didn’t see were anyone recommended reading “How to Remove a Model T Ford from Mothballs” see: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html and scroll down to Tom Mullin’s posting the third posting from the top.


Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john a voss on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 05:19 pm:

Just want to take a second & thank all of you for answering what
must seem like the same question over & over. I am also new to
" T's " . Every time I have a question , all I have to do is wait
24 hr's & there's the answer. Keep up the good work .

jack --- central NY


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 06:01 pm:

John, you can also find the answers you need using the keyword search at the top of the forum page. Keep the keyword as simple and brief as possible to zero in on what you require. For instance, if you have a question regarding the front spring perch, if you enter "front spring perch" in the keyword search box, every thread that has "front" in it will come up, as will every thread that has "spring" in it and every post with "perch" in it, which may be thousands of threads to search through, but if you just put in "perch", the number of threads coming up will be limited to just perch and you will pretty much be able to easily find your answer. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 07:47 pm:

For John

Welcome aboard. Your profile shows you have not been posting long and you mentioned you were new to T’s – so welcome aboard. You didn’t ask – so feel free to ignore the following: For someone new to T’s recommend taking a look at: there are several good suggestions there. And of course feel free to ask the group –- in my case I’ve already made many of the common mistakes so you don’t have to make them all yourself – you can read about what happened to me and others. And of course many others have a wealth of knowledge to help folks out with. You didn’t ask – so feel free to ignore – but for a new T owner many of the items at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/116352.html may be helpful. Scroll down to the Friday, December 04, 2009 - 08:56 pm entry it has lots of helpful links in it.

Again welcome aboard.

Speaking of common mistakes that reminds me – if you have the transmission inspection cover off [as shown in the Ford Service above] be very careful about anything above it that can fall in – like wrenches, nuts, the key from the ignition switch if you have the switch on the coil box, etc. They didn’t say it in the Ford Service, but stuffing rags around the transmission can keep anything that does fall in from going all the way down into the engine and transmission. But be sure to take the rags out after the work is completed.

For Jim,

Something else that has helped me with the searches is the third line down or so it has “or” and I change that to “and” so that all the words are in the forum thread. In your example is I search on “front spring perch" with or – there are too many returns for it to work and it gives me an error. If I also add “within the last 180 days “ (about half a year) it gives 1247 returns for the “front spring perch”. But if I select “and” and search again the last 180 days I only have 37 returns. And if you remember someone that posted the item such as Boggess and using the “and” you only have 2 returns in all the forums. In those two cases Trent Boggess did not actually post, but his name and references were mentioned in the posting.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 08:41 pm:

John
It is great that the forum helps you. Buying the Ford service manual would really help you and all other new owners. It has a wealth of good information. It also tells you how long it will take you to fix something ;-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 08:46 pm:

Oh Boy Oh Boy!

Thanks for all the replies, and for the emails that were sent to me. A great group. I didn't get out to the garage today, had to help a friend hang some pocket doors.

The way I figured the car shifts between high and low, was while I was pushing it around the drive way. After the car was dropped off, I took out the plugs to put some oil in the cylinders, and to make it easier to push into the garage. I pushed the car with the lever half way, and all the way forward, it was in high both times. Pulling the brake lever back a little applied the brakes, and there was no pushing it then! By pushing the car with the low pedal depressed, the engine turned over faster. Pushing the car, while letting up on the pedal, it just goes right into high.

I had read about the congealed oil, and took the drain plug out several days ago, and left the pan under there. I was planning on taking out the "dipper-splasher" area pan and cleaning it as well. (My 1949 Pontiac had a full quart of sediment in its pan, though the engine ran merrily) I figure that with the plate off, I can see in there as well, I like looking inside engines and seeing how everything is getting along.

I will post a picture of the plugs I have tomorrow. I realize they spark from the side.


Those scans are perfect, thanks "Hap"!

I was thinking of oh Brother where art thou, though it does feel like I live in that town when I have to order things!

All I want right now, is to figure out what I need to order, to make my car happy for a while, and go for a little drive, even if just in my driveway. Heck, I'm happy laying under it scraping the goo off the bottom with a putty knife!

Its up on jack stands right now, and I'm going to start 'er up tomorrow.

Thanks again everybody!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 09:10 pm:

Good, you'll learn a lot by getting it running. Here is a word of caution if you decide to jack one back wheel up when starting it. That wheel will spin faster than you can believe and since there is virtually no balance to the wheel and tire assembly, it can start jumping up and down pretty quick and pretty hard. It can jump off the jack stand or jack before you know it and when it comes down it can head for you, a wall or the back pasture and cause a lot of damage. If you are going to jack up the rear end and then start it, set it down on a couple of long wooden blocks like sections of railroad tie, etc. There is more than one person who has bought another brand new radiator to replace the brand new one that slammed into the wall at high speed. More than one T has got away and been making circles in the yard until it hit something and quit.

Here's how I know this.

Several years ago, I had my speedster setting on a big floor jack under the left rear axle about six inches in from the brake backing plate. I had just put the back wheels on with new tires. I started it and was going to adjust the carburetor and do some things to it. I was sitting on a stool beside it--just behind the front wheel. It popped into high gear (the neutral lever pawl was shot) and within just seconds--before I realized what had happened and what was happening, it jumped off the jack, burned rubber for about six feet and slammed into the wall that divides the work shop and machine shop area of my shop. Six inches to the left and it would have smacked a hole in my new Brassworks radiator. Scared the stuffing right out of me. This was a speedster I build, it ran great and couldn't have been over 1/4 throttle for three or four seconds when all this happened. Made a believer out of me to not start one just setting on a jack. It's even easier to do with a car you are unfamiliar with or one that you are trying to get to run for the first time.

Be careful.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 12:30 am:

I figured that, about the one wheel race I mean. I put the whole car up on stands, so I can zoom around on a creeper underneath, though not at the same time its running of course.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 02:16 am:

One more important thing that most new Model T owners have to learn the hard way is: The front left wheel nut has right hand threads, so, unscrews the normal way (counter-clockwise), but the right hand wheel nut has left hand threads, so it unscrews clock-wise. Back in 1970 I about twisted off the right hand spindle before taking a close look at the threads and realizing my error. The reason for this is so that the forward revolving wheel won't, somehow, catch the nut and tighten it on the wheel and twist off the spindle. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 09:06 am:

Christopher,

Your description of pushing the car and how you determined that the low works but there is no neutral is typical for any Model T Ford with straight 30 wt oil and a cold engine in winter. Your clutch and its adjustment may be fine like it is. Note paragraph 1065 posted above and reposted here:

1

I would add to that in Dec even with it above freezing with straight 30 wt oil it will appear to be in high gear until the engine warms up. Which means if you crank it with all the wheels on the ground it will go forward over a small chock and/or be under a heavy load if you have a chock large enough that it cannot jump it and roll forward. In theory the emergency brake will hold it – but I like to use chocks that I can see, since I put the left rear wheel up to start it in cold weather. In my case, I know the left rear wheel on our four cars is not that far out of balance to cause the car to hop – but you won’t know until you start it for the first few times – so Stan’s “lesson learned” is an excellent safety item. Use a large object under the axles the first time you crank it. If the wheel/tire is way out of balance – it could cause it to jump off a jack stand -- or point it towards the open field. I would not start it the first time with all four wheels up on jack stands. The front jack stands may cause problems if they are run over. And you can chock the other three wheels if they are on the ground. Of course if you are using an electric starter – you are in the car and you can retard the throttle faster than if you have to run from the front of the car.

2

While it is a cartoon – it is really true – I’ve been up against the wall as my T tried to warm up ….to me so to speak. The cartoon is from page 19 of Floyd Clymer’s “Henry’s Wonderful Model T Ford.” It is out of print – but a fun read with good stories and cartoons. Much of the technical data has been updated since it was published in 1955 so that part is not so good, but the pictures are excellent and the stories are good. Available from used books stores.

This is also where having someone who is familiar with Ts could be very helpful. They will push the spark down and the throttle up when it starts and keep it running. But if you pull them both down by mistake the engine is now going full throttle. If you haven’t read the following postings – I would recommend them before you try to start the car.

There is a good thread on removing a Model T From mothballs at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html and scroll down to Tom Mullin’s posting the third posting from the top.

For information on how to drive it see http://www.mtfca.com/books/bookmenu.htm and scroll down and click on the Ford instruction manual for your car – the 1926 is at: http://www.mtfca.com/books/1926Inst.htm they share more than you may need at first -- but it was given to new Ford owners -- along with a how to drive from the dealer. A quick 10 minute check out with someone will save you lots of time. Back in the 1960s I felt free to drive around the block for a test drive without insurance. I knew the neighbors and the police and people were not ready to take you or McDonald’s to court if they spilled a cup of coffee. Those days are gone – at least around here. I would recommend that you NOT take it out on a public road etc. until it is properly tagged and insured. And also until you know the brakes work, steering is working, and you know how to work them. If you have a friend with a field or farm roads or a church or other private property with a large parking lot – you would probably be ok.

For additional driving information see also:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/6815.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/6/1662.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/15776.html

Before you start driving it in other than an empty area be sure to check out some of the safety items discussed at:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/13483.html

on cranking: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/68644.html?1224126132

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/69444.html

they are not fast – slow moving vehicle sign: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/96515.html?1246128999

Safety Glass is nice: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/72116.html

Use safety wire and not lock washers or cotter pins on the two studs holding the wishbone to the underside of the engine. http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/47898.html

Lots of safety items – looks like I’m behind on writing that safety article… http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/69429.html

Over center steering – shouldn’t happen on the later Ts – but if someone replaced your later teens steering gear housing or rebuilt it without the lock pin – it might happen: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/86345.html

Types of safety wire: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/41859.html

Example of loss of brakes caused by drive shaft failure: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/47804.html

Top T tips – many of them are safety related also: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/85208.html

Tour safety check list: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/44331.html

And if you have a gas hot water heater in the garage – be very very careful. The float in a Model T Carb will sometimes stick (or trash in the valve) and the carb will leak gasoline. Not too bad if there are no sparks. However, several homes, garages and cars have been lost when a gas hot water heater was near by and the car leaked gas.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 12:08 pm:

This thread contains an article from the July, 1963 issue of Popular Science, entitled, "Any Dope Could Drive a Model T", which I first read as a nine year old boy and saved until finally obtaining my own Model T at the age of 16 in 1970.

In the days before the internet and Model T clubs, this article taught me how to drive my Model T. It is all I had and it served me well. I hope it helps you as well.

www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/102160.html.

Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 11:16 pm:

Okay. I was able to spend all day in the garage today. I spent a few hours with a putty knife and some kerosene, scraping the caked on oil grease and dirt from the engine and trans.

She fired right up, after a bit of coaxing. Boy, was there alot of smoke! What a great time.

The trouble was, as suggested, thick cold ugly oil, and the pedals are out of adjustment. Just the hand brake mainly.

I drained some of the new new oil, filled it back up with kerosene, ran it for a few minutes, and changed oil again.

Here is a picture of one of the plugs I found in the parts box.

Its hard to tell, but the end of the side electrode is beveled from both sides, just like side cutters would leave....

number one


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck - Shreveport, LA on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 06:03 am:

Christopher,

Glad you got it going!

A far safer approach to flushing the engine, in my opinion, is to use three quarts 10W-30 motor oil plus one quart cheap (Dexron/Mercon) automatic transmission fluid.

The oil will get dirty pretty fast, so change it every 250 miles or so. To get the most crap out at each oil change, change the oil after running the engine and the oil is hot.

Invest in both a transmission cover screen and plop a magnet in it to catch ferrous wear from the past that all that detergency in the oil mix is going to uncover. The screen does a good job of catching band lint and there will be plenty of that uncovered as the engine begins to clean up. Catching the lint is far better than it plugging up internal oil lines.

Within 1000 miles (four oil changes), inside of engine should be getting cleaned up. Dropping back to 1/2 qt. ATF at each oil change might be best.

ATF in the oil is good for keeping the bands quiet (chatter free) and is an excellent solvent to continue cleaning up the inside of your engine. It can be used in the mix at every oil change.

Seth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 08:56 am:

Christopher,

That’s great that you got it going.

From the angle of the picture I cannot tell what type of spark plug you have. There were many manufactures of them and some were very similar to the Champion X and others were different.

Below is a picture from the Apr 1922 Ford Service Bulletins of a Champion X style plug similar to the one you have. If your plug is a Champion X, you can hold your plug so it looks the same as the one in the picture and compare the electrodes. They should be similar.

1

Again, glad you got it running.

Very Respectfully,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 09:27 am:

I can't imagine why anyone would snip off the central electrode. Your photo is hard to see but, My thought is that it got like that through normal wear. I know mine become bevelled and rounded off, whenever they have seen lots of service. If it worries you, though, I would take a Dremel Tool and gently grind the end flat until the edge of the central electrode is sharp all around (careful;. Don't take off much!), then slightly push the outer electrode down toward the top of the spark plug (not toward the center) until the end is even with the end of the central electrode, then gap as Hap's illustration advises. If anyone sees a problem with this, please speak up. I would much rather be corrected than give questionable advice. Thank you. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck - Shreveport, LA on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 09:53 am:

I can't see the picture because I screwed up my settings.

By what you are describing Christopher, in my opinion, it'll make no difference whatsoever as long as the gap between the center and ground electrodes is somewhere between 0.025" and 0.032".

If the engine won't run well with the gap at 0.032" then either the plug is fouled or what's powering the plug isn't up to snuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher Lang on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 10:48 am:

Boy, looking at that picture this morning, I should have put a piece of white paper behind it. I will clean them up, gap, and shove them in the engine.

I forgot to say in my excitement yesterday, that the car will run on magneto. It just wants a little more advance on the lever.

Seth, I changed out the oil/kerosene after five minutes, of just idling.

Boy, just have to adjust the parking brake lever, and I can drive around the block. Then when the parts get here, rebuild the carb, and begin to go further from home. The way the spray needle and seat are right now, I am amazed it runs at all. It does not like a really slow idle. But I suspect the condition of the carb is the culprit here.

Fantastic!
Christopher


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration