How they do it! "Modern Auto Plant"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: How they do it! "Modern Auto Plant"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 01:11 pm:

I got this in an email today. I don't have my sound hooked up so I couldn't hear it. It came from a friend in Belgium and I don't speak Dutch so I had to just watch it. Have fun.

http://www.livevideo.com/media/playvideo_fs.aspx?fs=1&cid=F4B5854611D141AFA19359 F36DCDC74F

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 01:27 pm:

Reminds me of the oilfield, "if it don't fit, get a bigger hammer". This would make a great comedy film, Laurel and Hardy type, I am not too sure that some of these folks may not have been hired here recently.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 01:37 pm:

Herb, the soundtrack is just musical accompaniment - no spoken word. A bunch of Trabants drove from Chicago to Los Angeles on Rte 66 a number of years ago, and came through St. Louis.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 01:40 pm:

They fit something like a Model T!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 02:23 pm:

First - I wouldn't call this modern auto plant as this is east German production of Trabants. It's 20 years ago the production stopped.
Secondly, I have seen similar scenes from western auto plants, where in particular the window frames in the doors are "adjusted" with big rubber hammers.
The "Trabi" has some plastic type bodypanels (no - not fiberglass - too advanced :-) so the adjustments indicate problems with the panels that the do not hoild the intended geometry.
And I know we europeans laugh when US poeople mix the european countries and cities together (ask an european of details of the 50 states in the union) but this is east germany - once a soverign european state - now part of Germany. Belgium is another sovereign state, but they do not speak dutch. That is the language in the neighbor country The Nederlands (or Holland).
Do they then speak Belgian in Belgium? No no - they speak 2 languages: In the nothern part flamish which do have similarities with dutch and a french dialect in southern part.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 02:43 pm:

Michael, Harry grew up in the Netherlands and is a recent immigrant to Belgium. I only met him once because of his sister in law being a friend of my sister. She told me they speak Dutch so that is why I wrote what I did. I'm not too worldly, but this forum is helping.:-)

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 02:49 pm:

Okay, Michael, permit me to correct your correction.... :-)

Belgium has three official languages, Dutch, French and German (in order of number of speakers). The language in the northern part of the country is called "Nederlands," which is Dutch for "Dutch." There is actually a treaty between the two countries on standardization of the Dutch language, although some vocabulary differs slightly. The spelling is identical (unlike American and British English). "Flemish" correctly refers to the dialect of Dutch spoken in Flanders, but it is not a separate language. Dutch-speaking Belgians call their language "Nederlands."

The reason Herb referred to Dutch is that he has a friend in Belgium who sends him stuff like this. He often passes it on to me and I translate it for him. In this case, he didn't have the sound and didn't know that it is only music.

I'll tell you another country-confusion story. I was shopping recently at Sam's Club (part of the Wal-Mart family of companies) and they had a supposedly upscale display of different international cheeses, each with the adjective for the country and the flag of the country. Under "Dutch," they had the Dutch tricolor flag and the cheese they listed was Havarti!! Reminds me of the Dutch Consul General in Chicago years ago who commented, "The only thing most Americans know about The Netherlands is that the capital is Copenhagen..."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 02:54 pm:

OK - no offence ment. The language in northern Belgium does resemble Dutch but is not Dutch.

Never mind - I wonder if this realy is a real film from the Trabant Werke in Eastern Germany.

Back then I do not think that comunist East Germany would allow videoing on the plant. That would be company or government people that did that, and then I doubt they would show how they had to twingle and hammer to make it fit.
And even if it was communist era a car factory would look like any other assembly line. This looks more like an underground parkinglot where they have made this using a handful of Trabis.
Its fake but fun :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 03:07 pm:

Okay, I guess we can agree to disagree, but "Het Groene Boekje" (the "green book" that is the Bible for spelling Dutch) says on the flyleaf, "Woordenlijst van de Nederlandse Taal, samengesteld in opdracht van de Nederlandse en de Belgische Regering" (Vocabulary of the Dutch Language, composed by order of the Netherlands and the Belgian Government." The Foreword is signed by both the Belgian and Dutch Ministers of Education, and the first sentence can be translated as "It is very satisfying for us to introduce with a few words the Vocabulary of the Dutch Language, composed by a commission of Netherlands and Belgian experts."

Afrikaans, on the other hand, "does resemble Dutch but is not Dutch." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 03:13 pm:

I'm pretty sure that's better quality control than my Dodge pickup had at the factory. I had to adjust all the doors myself and it still has a lot of wind noise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 04:37 pm:

Stan's back!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 05:16 pm:

Fitting the bonnet reminds me of doing the same on my mini. hmmm, a little off, I'll just give it a little kiss WHAM WHAM WHAM there, factory fresh!
There was a guy selling Trebis in Mn, he's out of the business I believe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 05:28 pm:

Dick - when you realise you are up against an expert you better rest your case. So that's what I do now :-)
The version of the joke with Copenhagen is around here (North of Copenhagen) that Copenhagen is the capital of Stockholm :-D
But Havarti is a Tilsiter type cheese, that was developed by a clever farmers wife, Hanne Nielsen, at the farm Havartigaard (Farm of Havarti) north of Copenhagen. The cheese was named after the farm.
The story does not tell where the name Havarti of the farm originated.
I've found this webpage in English:
http://www.answers.com/topic/havarti
Footnote: Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and Copenhagen the capital of Denmark. You may see a lot in the news these days from Copenhagen i guess since a lot of peple is gathered here to discuss how to handle one of the consequencies of Henrys 15 mill Model T's and its successors and maybe some increased solar activity as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 05:36 pm:

Michael, I'm sure the Sam's Club Havarti error comes from people confusing Danish and Dutch. I get it all the time, even from people who should know better. Through the years, I have occasionally received requests from translation companies to do a project from Dutch to English. When they send it, it turns out to be Danish.

We're going to a small get-together for wine and cheese tomorrow evening at the home of Danish friends here. I wonder if they'll have Havarti... :-)

By the way, just to make things more confusing, the capital of The Netherlands is Amsterdam, but the national government (parliament, ministries) and embassies are in The Hague.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 05:58 pm:

Stan,Ole buddy I hate to tell you,but that wind noise is probably coming from the inside! (G)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 10:10 pm:

Jack
I love it!!!!!!!
Ya gotta realize he'll get even someday.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 10:30 pm:

ROFLMAO.... Jack, you made me spew Big Red out of my nose, dang it!

Be back later... I gotta clean my keyboard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nugent on Saturday, December 12, 2009 - 10:38 pm:

I liked the video - maybe it was Korean?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Sunday, December 13, 2009 - 01:08 pm:

Stan,Allthough I tend to aggree with Jack,:>) I can also aggree a Dodge truck has WAY to much windnoise comeing from the outside as well.I can stick my fingers through the top of the door to the outside while sitting in the passenger seat of my dads 92 he bought new.Been that way since it left the dealer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 12:55 pm:

Michael, just to finish the story above. We went to our Danish friends' get-together yesterday evening. Of all the people there, Anja and I were the only ones who weren't either (a) Danish or (b) married to someone Danish. A little circle of English followed us around from room to room. They didn't have Havarti, although there were some very good cheeses, and there was also gløgg, which has to be ranked as one of Denmark's great contributions to civilization... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 01:02 am:

Well, I'm 1/4 Flemish, with family still in Antwerp, but my mom refused to learn the language, as she was going to "speak American" -- a decision she regrets today! And that's about all I know about it!
T'ake care
David D.
PS am realizing that now I have a few days less than 5 years to get my touring together for it's 100th birthday!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By richard wolf on Tuesday, December 15, 2009 - 05:09 pm:

Can you imagine what a car built in China will be like? They will be coming.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, December 20, 2009 - 11:34 am:

Ken I have a hard time imagining Mao rolling on the floor laughing.
http://danielfelton.com/images/ROFLMAO.jpg

Herb


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