Finally got my new T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Finally got my new T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nugent on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 03:31 pm:

I finally got my new model T. It is a 1918 and I am clueless. I have the photos posted onmy company website if anyone is interested to look and give me any and all information to get her running. It took me forever to figure out how to get the back wheels turning. It has not been running in many years.

I was amazed how many people stopped to look as the wreaker drove through town.

http://www.3dwoodcraft.com/t.html

t1

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard Tobias on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 03:46 pm:

Mark
Nice looking car. It looks like all it needs some air in the tires and not much else to get going! Enjoy
Howard


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By karl v schlachter on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 04:07 pm:

Mark cool car. Others will chime in here, You should get another model T'er to come and show you how to get her running and how to drive her. These cars can hurt you if you don't know what you are doing and what all the controls do


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Gelfer on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 04:17 pm:

Very nice car. Get 'er going and you will have a ball!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern Ca. on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 04:25 pm:

Mark, Nice car! Here's a link to a great article on taking your T out of mothballs that used to be posted on the Towe Auto museum in Sacramento. Follow this and you can't go wrong bringing your car up to reliable touring.
http://s290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/fordmodelt/taking%20a%20T%20out%20of%20 mothballs/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 04:28 pm:

Mark,Wellcome to the Stemwinders! Post where you are and someone should give you a hand! Bud


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nugent on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 04:42 pm:

I live in Marietta, georgia at the foot of Kennesaw Mountain. It looks to be all atock - any noticable differences.

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nugent on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 04:56 pm:

I woould love for any "stemwinder" to come and show me the ropes and help get me started in the passion!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls,WI on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 05:10 pm:

Mark:
You got yourself a beauty. She looks ready to start right now. Only missing 2 things. She needs a hot air pipe and me riding shotgun. I bet you could replace the oil, add fresh gas, water in the radiator, and away you go.

Might have to stop at the gym and build up those arm muscles. This is a cranker.

Good luck and have fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 05:14 pm:

I know of NO ONE that has ever used a hot air pipe in this part of the country.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern Ca. on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 05:23 pm:

Mark, Looks like you have a Model T Ford International club chapter up the road from you. Here's the contact info.
NORTH GEORGIA Ts
Calvin Watts
PO Box 672
Fairmount GA 30139 US
706-337-5964


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls,WI on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 05:32 pm:

Dave,
If he gets it running and comes up to visit he will need a hot air pipe. We have a foot of snow on the ground and high of 20 today. I had my T out yesterday and she ran just fine. I might even take my kids to school Friday when it gets up to 30. Might be a bit chilly in the touring, but hey, its almost Christmas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 06:47 pm:

Wow, what a perfectly complete car! Even the upholstery is good. Looks like all it needs to look absolutely gorgeous is a bucket of suds, a garden hose and a tin of Simoniz. I'm turning green with envy, here. Enjoy!!!

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JACK ROSSI on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:04 pm:

Jay, thank you very much for that link....I also am new to the T...I put it in my favorites and sent my grandson a copy and we are studying it...Sure got a lot of answers to questions I never asked...We are starting on page one of nine on my '25 roadster...

FLIVER JACK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harvey Decker on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:11 pm:

Mark
That is one sweet T !
I think I can see your smile from here?

smile


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:14 pm:

That's a very nice looking piece of machinery. If it runs as good as it looks, you got a good one. If it doesn't run very well it is easy to work on and a fun project if you are handy with tools. If not, you can find some locals who can refer you to the best Model T mechanics. They are a different breed. The ones that work on modern cars are not the ones to trust with a Model T.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:22 pm:

How do they know you don't have a hot air pipe? I didn't see a picture of the inside of the engine compartment and didn't read anything from your posts about it. The hot air pipe goes from the air intake on the carburetor to the back of the exhaust manifold held in place by the rear nut on the side of the block. If you don't have one, you can get one from any of the vendors. I run them on all my cars and I live in Sunny So. California where it rarely gets below freezing. Your car will run smoother, and have few spark plug problems if you run with one on. It will not make the car overheat. I have run the same autolite spark plugs on my 26 roadster for 20 years and never cleaned them. It ran every day of the Kanab tour last june.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:24 pm:

I stand corrected. I looked at your http and saw that you don't have one. Try it. You'll like it.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR. on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:35 pm:

Mark -- First and foremost, learn to crank with your left hand, which is the only safe way to do it. Don't believe anyone who tells you otherwise. Also, keep your thumb on the same side of the crank handle as your fingers.

Second, get to know some experienced Model T'ers near you and ask them for advice. They will be glad to help you out. T's are not more complicated than modern cars, but they are different. There are things about them that you will need to learn in order to be safe in your T. As mentioned above, it takes some T education to keep from getting hurt (or driving through the garage door). :-)

Third, Dave Huson lives in the Rocky Mountains, and Model T's run better there without hot air pipes. Your car will run better where you live with the pipe.

Fourth, you might as well start saving for a new radiator, which is expensive. I understand that Berg's radiator shop makes nice ones for your car which cost less than other suppliers. The water pump is a clue that the radiator wasn't cooling, so someone put the pump on it because it was much less expensive than a new radiator. But for peace of mind, go ahead and spring for the new radiator, then you can throw the water pump away and not need to worry about the cooling.

Fifth, you are starting with a much nicer and more complete Model T than most of us did. Congratulations! Get advice from others, learn all you can about the car, do what needs to be done to make it safe, and drive the wheels off it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob wood on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:39 pm:

Norm, I clicked on the link and the carb/no hot air pipe pic is the eigth pic down.

Mark, great job of showing us pictures of your T.
This looks like it has a lot of character (patina). It looks like it just drove out of the barn after 90 years!
I am sure the link will help you, but be sure you inflate the tires to plus 55 lbs. These clincher tires/rims need the higher pressure to stay together and not rip the valve stem or tear off the tire bead.
Please keep us posted on your progress.
bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls,WI on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 07:53 pm:

Dear Mark and Mike--- my T came with a water pump. I took it off and the T runs just fine without it. Mine is a 1919-20? touring. I recommend you try running without the water pump and see how she goes. You may not have to worry about a new radiator. There are posts on this board discussing the water pump and whether or not it cools off #1 cylinder too much.

I am beginning to wonder if some people added a water pump because that was the thing to do at that time, and everyone was doing it.

It would be nice if you can find someone to show you how to drive. My first time out I did not hit the garage, but I forgot how to stop and ran all over the neighbors front yard.

Don't forget to click on everyone's name at the top of these posts. Nice to see what their T looks like if they have a photo on board.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls,WI on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 08:09 pm:

Am I correct in reading that Mark has a 1917 engine? Mark - can you see the engine number behind the water pump?

You also have a 2 man top. It is a little confusing to put it up and take it down unless someone is there to help you. Maybe Santa will bring you a boot to store it in.

If Georgia allows it, you could make a pretty neat license plate for the front thru your business.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 08:16 pm:

Looks to be a nice T there Mark. From your photos, it appears as though your steering column is the '15-'16 style with the horn button on top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 08:38 pm:

Dave Hjortnaes:

The 1918 model year started in August 1917 so even though the casting date on Mark's motor is October 1917, it would be considered a 1918 Model T Ford.

What I find interesting is the horn button on top of the steering column which indicates to me that firewall mounted headlight switch was carried over at least into mid-October of 1917 before the changeover to the combination horn button/light switch. (I presume this is a car with a real history and not a "put-together.")

Some have claimed that the combination horn button/light switch started showing up on cars around February 1917 but cars that have known histories with which I am familiar including three 1917s (my unrestored May '17 roadster, the June '17 Rip Van Winkle touring, my dad's July '17 touring which he purchased in 1949 in original unrestored condition from the original family), a friend's 1918 (September '17 roadster fairly complete and unrestored prior to a full restoration) as well as Mark's car indicate that the changeover occurred well into the 1918 model year.

Erik Johnson


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Orlando Ortega Jr. on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 08:50 pm:

Mark,

Congratulations! It's a beauty. I became a first time "T" owner not too long ago and everyone took me in as if I had always been a part of the family. Everyone is very knowledgeable and helpful. I look forward to someday crossing paths in our Model T's.

Orlando


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 09:17 pm:

Mark,

Very nice. Mike Walker has some good advice about cranking the car. I would fix whatever needs to be done in the drive line and start driving and enjoying it. Join a local T club, ask a lot of questions and you will find that you will get lots of help. One word of caution, before you drive it much check and see if the rear end has original Babbitt thrust washers. They can break down and are dangerous. They must be replaced with new bronze thrust washers. If this is not done you can find yourself without brakes.
Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 10:21 pm:

Mark,

Great looking T you have there! From the casting date of 10 15 17 for Oct 15, 1917 on the left side of your engine block combined with the 1915-1917 style horn button on top of the steering column, you car appears to be an early 1918. Bruce McCalley at: http://mtfca.com/encyclo/1918.htm states the 1918 model year was approximately August 1917 to January 1919. So a Model T assembled in Oct or Nov 1917 would be considered a 1918. Bruce McCalley states, “The 1917 cars evolved into the 1918 with little in the way of changes.” Meaning there was very little difference between the last of the 1917 Fords and the first of the 1918 Fords. The combination horn and light switch is considered typical for 1918 USA produced cars (ref: where Bruce states: “In late 1917, actually during “1918” production, the light switch was combined with the horn button. Now located on the left side of the column, the button was pushed for the horn, and turned for the headlights.” That agrees with what Erick points out above, the earlier style was continued into Sep & Oct 1917 on some cars. And of course the Highland Park plant probably switched over to the new 1918 combination horn light switch before the branch assembly plants made that change. (Canadian cars continued horn button on top of the steering column and the push pull light switch for several years longer than the USA production.). When you have a chance please take a look on the right front passenger floorboard riser and see if there are any numbers or a letter. Sometimes they are very easy to read and sometimes they are not there or they were worn off or the wood was replaced etc. way back when. Take a look at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/40322.html for details on where to look for the number and also a body manufacture letter. If your body was produced by Beaudett, Wilson, and a few others – they apparently used a date code which will also help you confirm approximately when your car was assembled. I.e. it cannot be made before the parts were produced.

Again, great looking car.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Wednesday, December 16, 2009 - 10:43 pm:

Nice new car Mark. All I can say is to verify the coils don't fire before top dead center with the spark lever retarded before you try your hand at stemwinding it the first time ..... then enjoy the heck out of it !

Regards,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 01:33 am:

Nice car Mark! Just take your time and learn as you go, you'll be cruising in no time! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren F Rollins on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 06:21 pm:

Mark, that is a really nice T. Back when that car was restored you could turn up some good ones. The license tag is about 50 years old. Being one of the Model T boys in Atlanta then , I am curious as to whom the tag was issured. Write me off screen if you like, I just wonder if I knew that car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan Woolf on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 08:08 pm:

Mark,
I sent you a PM.

Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 10:04 pm:

Mark,
I also sent you a PM. :-D
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Susan C on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 12:26 am:

Very nice. wouldn't mind taking it for a spin myself!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 12:35 am:

Great looking car, well done and enjoy driving her whenever you can. Dave C.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III on Saturday, December 19, 2009 - 10:16 am:

Mark if you keep your garage door just slightly up from being closed you will find out that another T will appear. Sometimes it takes a little while for it to appear but it will happen. Strange how that works.LOL John

PS Mike Walker is right. As a new T owner you need to get use to left arm cranking. Don't become a member of the broken right arm club. If you would like information on joining the a fore mentioned club please contact me because I became the president shortly after getting my first t.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf on Sunday, December 20, 2009 - 01:36 am:

The pain was excruciating. I lay down on the ground and passed out. When I came to, I drove to the hospital. It was a tractor, but a T can do the same thing to you. Mike and John are right. Use the left hand and only pull up; never go over the top.


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