Odd hogshead

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Odd hogshead
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Frink on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 03:06 am:

A friend of mine has an odd hogshead that he would like to sell. I have no idea what the application for it was. It appears to have had a gearset behind the clutch drum. Does anyone recognize it? Is there any interest in it?
Contact me at Frinks(at)centurytel(dot)net.
Bob
hogshead1
hogshead2
hogshead3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 03:48 am:

Just a wild guess, would that have been made for a stationary engine setup that didn't need a transmission? It looks like there is a bearing for an output shaft instead of the fourth main, and all the clutch did was engage/disengage the output shaft. Again, just a wild guess,I haven't seen anything like it before. Here you go Jay, any thoughts? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 07:29 pm:

I figure it is a sliding gear conversion. I have a complete one that is slightly similar. The reverse idler was mounted at the right in the lower picture. The cluster in the centre into the big boss at the back of the cover. The shifter rails into the two holes on the left of the lower picture. With this and $1500-2000.00 you could have a pretty neat T accessory.
The one I have, I have seen one other, both in Western Canada. We worked together and now we both have complete units. This one is a lot different. Same concept though.
Jay you can have it, I'll pass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern Ca. on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 08:02 pm:

I've never seen one but I believe Les is right about it being a sliding gear conversion housing.
Put it on Ebay, you'll find out what it's worth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff rey L. Vietzke on Thursday, December 17, 2009 - 10:05 pm:

I like your steel-toed safety shoes, Bob. They look a lot like mine!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Fenton on Friday, December 18, 2009 - 10:38 am:

Could be a marine conversion


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, December 18, 2009 - 12:32 pm:

John
I have never seen a marine conversion with a foot clutch. First time for everything though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Friday, December 18, 2009 - 02:48 pm:

Les, I worked as a deck hand on a water taxi back in 1951 and the boat had a Ford overhead four valve per cylinder Tank engine with a foot clutch and a huge brass handled lever about four feet long to shift into forward and reverse, so they were made for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, December 18, 2009 - 03:18 pm:

Frank
I stand corrected. Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Friday, December 18, 2009 - 03:37 pm:

There were also a lot of small boats with Star engines and transmissions with the foot clutch still hooked up. They used Star engines because they had a lot of bronze in the engine block alloy. They used raw sea water for cooling. They left the car transmission on it and you had three speeds forward and one in reverse.

A lot of boats used automobile engines, Chrysler inline 6's and 8's were popular. They got one season out of them and went to the wrecking yard the next year for another one. The larger engines used marine transmissions and those had the clutch conections built into the shifting lever.

I am talking 30's and into the 50's era. Our extended family ran several General Petroleum marine fuel stations in the Los Angeles Harbor area. I serviced the boats and learned a lot about how stuff works as a rather young lad. We also sold the crushed ice and blew it into the holds to keep the fish on the older boats without refrigeration. 200 pound blocks of ice went up a conveyer belt and were crushed at the top of the lift where gravity dispenced it through a rubber tube like a fire hose. Later on in the 50's we used a blower to blow it through the tube.

A lot of the water taxies were ex rum runners and some had Hall-Scott engines and some even had Liberty aircraft engines in them. A lot of them were converted to Buda diesels and then they would only go about 16 knots rather than the 40 they did with the other engines. Gas was 16 cents a gallon and diesel pumped at 11 cents for over 200 gallon orders. After WWII they took the Jimmy 671's out of landing barges and those were faster than the Budas.

You could get a landing barge for $200 and put a sharp nose on it so that it didn't plow.

Enough of this it isn't T, sorry to go on.


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