Help wanted with a yard art sign

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Help wanted with a yard art sign
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 10:28 am:

For many years here at home we had a cedar post sign with a horse cut out of plywood mounted on it.A Tennesse walker I think.Anyhow.It was about 4 foot wide and 3 foot tall.Kinda to scale.
Anyhow.Thank goodness we aint had horses here for years.
But since that sign has gotten in fowl shape,I would rather find a pattern to cut out of plywood of a Model T or similar vintage car,or of a vintage motorcycle since my dad rides old Harleys.
Does anyone have a pattern of something like this that could be traced out on plywood and cut out?
I would greatly apprceiate it.I can photo the horse sign to further explain myself if needed as I may not be explaining what I want well enough.Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dena & Dennis Gorder on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 10:44 am:

I believe both MACs and Langs have line drawings of the various Model T body styles. Trace the body style of your choice on some clear acetate, then use an overhead projector to project it on to the plywood. Trace the outline on to the plywood, cut it out and paint. Quite often you can borrow or rent an overhead project from your local library.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 11:17 am:

Mack, You can take a favorite photograph or magazine picture and place it on an opaque projector and, at night, project the picture onto a piece of plywood and trace around the image. If you are good at painting, you can actually duplicate the details of the photo or image. Unlike an overhead projector, that requires the image to be on a clear plastic page, an opaque projector highly illuminates the face of the photo or page and, with mirrors, reflects the image onto a surface. The further back you pull the projector, the larger the image and it focuses to crystal clarity. Here at the railcar repair shop, we own our own opaque projector to apply logos and stencils onto the sides of massive railcars. We have a "DA-LITE VU-LYTE IV" and I have included a link for the manual so you can study it for yourself:
www.kmr.com/manuals/beseler/VL4_01.HTM.
You might be able to rent one from a rental agency or borrow one from a school or college, or even buy one on ebay for a good price if you do alot of this type work or want to get into sign painting for a sideline to make extra money during these difficult times. Good luck. Post a pic when you are done. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 11:31 am:

Mack,

I'm a bit naturally gifted at being artsey for things like signs, etc. Truth is, I am not an artist by any stretch of imagination! I'm pure mechanical in lay-up, but the end result works.

What do I mean by mechanical?

Graph paper...lol

First I make a copy of what I want to have on the sign. Then I overlay a grid on it using a ruler. Say 1" squares.

Then I take the sign material...and if you can find it locally, go for something called MDO as it paints great and hardly ever rots. A bit pricey...but it does have longevity.

I then put a grid on that using a drywall square. For a 4x8 sheet coming off of an 8 x 10 original photo, I then make the grids on the sign with a soft pencil at 6 x 6 inches.

Still with me?

Then I put 'tick' marks on the sign grid proportionally everywhere something crosses a line on the grid on the original. Then simply 'connect the dots' with freehand curves and/or lines. Use a soft pencil, have a white eraser, and sketch/oversketch/erase until you get the lines you want where you want!

Then it is a matter of simply 'paint by the numbers' with infill. Works every time.

I do the same but in reverse when I do computer art, I simply shrink it to a smaller grid. If you recall the 15 Roadster graphic I put up a few months ago, that is exactly how I did it...set a grid on the computer, used photo's and a yard stick of my own 15...and then connected the dots and infilled. I have started to modify that to a tourer for others to have as a graphic, and someone on this forum actually sent me the touring tub dimensional drawing so all I have done so far is to make my graphic of the roadster a 'cut'off' and then using the same tricks, 'build' a tourer'.

If you want the dimensions and what I have so far, send me an email.

I did the same thing for this recent graphic to make a bumper sticker magnet working from originals....not to bad, it works and really does not take that long once ya get the hang of it!

1

Then there is the next 'project' which will be based on this.........

2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nugent on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 12:02 pm:

I have cut many signs using my CNC router. I would be happy to cut the shape of a T out of plywood (I would suggest 1/2 inch MDO for out doors). I would not charge you any fees to cut -just what is costs for the wood $56.00 4 x 8 sheet and actual shipping fees (which could be high because of weight and size). Just an offer. If you are in Atlanta area you could even pick it up.

All I would need is a line drawing (vector if possible), the cut piece needs to be at max 46 inches tall and 92 inches wide, and a few weeks to get past Christmas.

My business link is http://www.3dwoodcraft.com/signscustom.html

you can see my T at http://www.3dwoodcraft.com/t.html

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 12:25 pm:

Get a drawing of a horse or car you like. A hores is easier than a car.

Draw little equally spaced squares on the design.

Get your board and draw as many squares on the board as there are on the drawing.

Use a pair of dividers or a ruler to find where a line crosses a square, like half way a fourth or what ever.

put a dot on the board in each same place. Use your calibrated eyes.

Make more squares where there is more detail.

Connect the dots and cut the wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck - Shreveport, LA on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 12:59 pm:

What is MDO?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nugent on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 01:10 pm:

MDO is a hardwood ply that uses a special glue and outer layer designed for outdoor elements.

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck - Shreveport, LA on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 01:12 pm:

Thanks Mark.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 01:23 pm:

Medium Density Overlay has heavy paper covering both sides that requires no priming and takes paint well. Be sure to seal the ends and edges.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 01:32 pm:

I always specify Marine Plywood if it is going to be subjected to the weather. see:
www.insidewoodworking.com/lumber/marine167plywood.html

While I'm not familiar with MDO (medium density overlay), I found a link that explains what it is:
www.insidewoodworking.com/mdo-and-hdo-plywood.html. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 06:30 pm:

MDO is used to make billboards. It is very durable. A friend used it to make a hopper for his wood stove pellets. I has sat outside for about 10 years, no paint. Still looks good, dirty, but good.
I've used it to make museum displays, as it paints like sheetrock, no grain marks either!
T'
David D.
PS, it comes one sided and two sided. for a cut-out, I'd look for the two-sided stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 06:50 pm:

George,You did it perfect with the farmhouse! How many of us would have thought of more than one chimney for more than one stove! I was raised in a house like that and that's the way they were made! Thank's.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Richard McNeill on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 08:23 pm:

Mack, E-mail me a pic of what you want on the sign. I will use my opaque projector to enlarge it to 3'x4' and trace it on a paper. I'll send you the paper and you can use carbon paper to transfer the pic on your board. Hope to see you at Chickasha again this March. Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 09:28 pm:

Thanks for the info and the offer Don.I will do some research and find a picture like I want in the comeing days.I used to have access to over head projectors but i aint sure there any left around these parts.
Gota run my f350's wheels about off tommorow hauling materials for the shop project so I wont be on the net much.I am sore from handling brick yesterday and today trying to run the Merry tiller fixing the shrub bed beside my shop.
I know,landscapeing around a shop sounds wimpy but I like landscapeing and I want my shop to look good.:>)


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