ACCESSORY OF THE DAY 12/22/09 AIR FRICTION CARBURETOR

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: ACCESSORY OF THE DAY 12/22/09 AIR FRICTION CARBURETOR
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern Ca. on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 11:53 am:

For today we have an aluminium bodied accessory carb. I've seen alot of these at swap meets but I've never seen one running on a car. Any body run one of these? If so does it run well?
airfriction airfriction1
airfriction2 airfriction3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A,J, Bell on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 01:51 pm:

Jay’s photo appears to show patent dates of
May 21 1912 and Sept 3 1912, but I could not
find anything for the May 21 date.
Here are the 2 patents that I did find . . .

Air-Friction Carburetor Co.
Dayton, Ohio

Patent number: 1037834
Filing date: Oct 9, 1911
Issue date: Sep 3, 1912
http://tinyurl.com/y8r3t8u

Patent number: 1088181
Filing date: Mar 5, 1913
Issue date: Feb 24, 1914
http://tinyurl.com/yevloey

And a couple of ads . . .

PopularMechanics
PopularScience


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Bond on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 04:11 pm:

Fascinating. I've got one on display in my showcase. Still have not downloaded a photo-shrinker yet as my pics seem to be too big to post. Air Friction also made spark plugs for Ts. Wonder what other accessory items they produced for our cars?
Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Bond on Tuesday, December 22, 2009 - 04:22 pm:

Nice. Got one on display in my old auto parts store display. Did you know Air Friction also made spark plugs for Ts? Wonder how many other accessories they made for our cars?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Csorba on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 07:01 am:

I have a couple of these (untried). I also a slightly larger bore updraft version that I have seen a picture of mounted on a T with a special manifold. Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 10:09 am:

I have been running one successfully for 30 years on a TT. No particular problems or comments.
TTengine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Marino on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 01:28 pm:

John, is that vacuum tank made by Stewart Warner?

Do you have to fill it up with gas on the first installation to get it to start working?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 01:56 pm:

Tony, yes that is a Stewart Warner. And yes, it needs to be filled/primed to initiate the process. I remove the fill line input from the gas tank and funnel in some gas. It stays primed for a long time if gas is shut off to the carb. The vacuum tank is something that works well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Marino on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 06:41 pm:

Is there another input or output on the bottom? It looks like there are two valves on the bottom in your photo? I am on a trip and away from my SW tank at home. Can they be rebuilt? I assume they have gaskets? I have never had mine apart. Mine was under the seat in my TT. I am missing the two straps that attach to the firewall. Do you have regular knurled brass fuel fittings in the three holes on the top?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern Ca. on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 08:56 pm:

tony here's a link to the manual.
http://s290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/fordmodelt/stewart%20vaccum%20gasoline/

MERRY CHRISTMAS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, December 23, 2009 - 09:07 pm:

I had a vacuum tank on my 27 Chevy pickup. It worked fine.

For those who don't know how they work: There is a float inside. When the gasoline in the vacuum tank gets low, the float drops, the vent is closed, and the line to the intake manifold opened. The vacuum from the intake manifold draws gasoline from the fuel tank to the vaccum tank. When the vacuum tank gets full, the float rises, the line to the manifold is closed, and the vent opened. The gasoline in the vacuum tank then feeds the carburator. When the vacuum tank gets low again, the process is repeated. The mechanism is designed to fill the vacuum tank in batches and not continuously.

One line at the top goes to the fuel tank. Another line goes to the intake manifold. The third line is the vent. The line at the bottom goes to the carb. There is a drain in the bottom too.

Vacuum tanks work well. You have to prime them the first time, but after that, they will fill automatically. They are disconnected on a lot of cars that you see for sale. Like all things mechanical, they eventually wear out and have to be rebuilt by someone who knows about them and appreciates them.

Neil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis on Thursday, December 24, 2009 - 10:53 am:

Tony,
Looks like you have a lot of good answers. Now is time to open it up and see it all. Install it and resolve fuel problems in climbing those steep Texas mountains.
Merry Christmas
John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth Harbuck - Shreveport, LA on Thursday, December 24, 2009 - 12:13 pm:

Tony,

I agree with the posts above that vacuum-operated fuel pumps work well. I need to add one safety consideration if you plan on using one and that is:

Mount it so that it is ALWAYS higher than the lowest fuel level in the tank.

Sure, this sounds like a no-brainer. :-)

If descending a very steep and long hill or by parking it severely nose-down and the fuel level in the tank is higher than the venting port(s) in the vacuum tank, it may overfill and spill out the vent(s).

Obviously, you don't want this to ever happen. :-)

Merry Christmas everyone!

Seth, in relatively flat, humid, and warm NW Louisiana


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Marino on Thursday, December 24, 2009 - 01:09 pm:

Thanks to all


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Marino on Thursday, December 24, 2009 - 01:49 pm:

Thanks Jay. The manual has very good info.


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