Leaking Ruxstell rear?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Leaking Ruxstell rear?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Colgrove on Sunday, December 27, 2009 - 02:33 pm:

I have a '26 T with a Ruxstell rear end. I am having oil/grease? leak out of the passenger rear wheel. I have lowered the level of oil in the Ruxstell but the leak continues.

Any ideas where to begin looking would be of great help.

Thanks,
Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, December 27, 2009 - 03:00 pm:

Scott
Well it would be reasonable that it leaks out of the passenger side as that is likely on the "ditch" side of the road in Montana (low side).
Lowering the level of the grease is probably not the best solution but if you don't go too low I can see the temptation.
The real solution is fix the seals on that side. Your car should have a leather seal arrangement behind (inside of) the roller bearing just behind (inside) the wheel.
1. remove the wheel and or hub if you have wire wheels. You should need a appropriate puller and this will depend on the type of wheels you have.
2. remove the pressed steel cover over the roller bearing.
3. evaluate the amount of wear in the axle, roller bearing and outer sleeve. Start by seeing how much vertical "slop". I would say if it is less than .010" seal life may not haunt you. If it is .060" (1/16") fixing the seal is not going to solve your problem alone.
Anyway the seal is located behind (inside) the roller bearing. Slide the roller bearing out and now you need to remove the outer sleeve race of the bearing. There is a special tool for this and as it is cheap to buy then if you can't borrow it, buy it!.
Once the sleeve is out, with a little careful work with a wire hook you can pull out the seal and it's spring steel washers .
Evaluate what you have and order the parts and put it back together.
Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lee Crenshaw on Sunday, December 27, 2009 - 03:17 pm:

Begin and end your search for a cure at www.antiquemotorsports.com/axleseals.html
This $48.00 kit will replace the old style inner and outer seals with contemporary neoprene seals
for both ends of the axle.
Loosen the offending rear wheel nut 3/4 turns, reinsert the cotter pin and drive to loosen the tapered hub from the axle. Jack up the rear wheel, remove the nut and wheel assembly. Clean off the grease. Remove the pressed steel cap on the end of the axle housing that retains the felt donut-style seals.(this may require a hammer and chisel) Make a hook tool from a piece of coat hanger, extract the old seals, then hook the axle bearing cage and pull out the bearing assy. On
your 26/27 housing there should be a inner bearing seal that is pressed into the housing and retained by the bearing race. The race is a sleeve that will require a special tool to extract. Once extracted install the new inner seal. Replace the bearing sleeve, the bearing and the new outer seal/cap assy. Keep in mind that these outer bearings are run in grease and are not dependent on lube from the rear end as are the inner axle bearings.
Lee


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 06:50 pm:

Hey Les - Not to be a "wise guy" or anything, but there's no such thing as a "ditch" alongside the road in Montana. What you refer to as a ditch is actually a "barrow pit" in Montana! Lived there for 10 years in the '70's and I thought it to be an odd term, but that's a fact. Also, there are no cars (or pickups) in Montana with glove compartments; they all have "jockey boxes". If ya' don't believe it, just ask that ol' Montana auctioneer in Helena; he'll tell ya'!

Just giv'n ya' "the business" Les, but it really is interesting about different terminology in different parts of the country, (and Canada),....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 08:27 pm:

Harold
Well I am not to old to learn something new.
Up here we have plenty of "borrow pits" by rural highways, but they are big usually a couple of hundred yards square by maybe 5-10 yards deep. They locate them so the farmer then gets a free dugout to collect cattle water from the runoff.
I suppose the Montana roads were built when they were using wheel barrows to move the dirt so "barrow pit" makes sense. We didn't start high grading roads until power equipment was invented.
My '65 Hayes semi/motor home has "jockey boxes" behind the seats and accessed from outside the cab.
I suppose that box in the dash is for Montana jockey underwear if you are a auctioneer on the road!!!
Up here we generally wear Stanfields, so I guess it would be a Stanfield box.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By MT Phono on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 01:27 pm:

Thanks for the advice guys. I'll try to get to this over the weekend.

Regards,
Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady Puryear on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 02:04 pm:

Here in Texas they are called "bar ditches". I was told it was because one "borrowed" the dirt and put it on the road. The railroad grade that went through our ranch was built with teams of mules, they have small hooves. You would not believe how hard that dirt was after 100+ years. They used mule drawn scrapers and etc., and the constant packing of the soil by those small hooves must have done it. When they abandoned the RR some time ago, a dozer had to grunt a bit to push the road bed material up into piles for sale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 12:20 am:

Les & Grady - Grady's explanation was exactly the explanation for the term "barrow pit" or more likely, "borrow pit" that I got in Montana. (not sure how to spell it but "borrow" does seem more likely)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 12:34 am:

Grady
They weren't always so particular up here on the RR. A friend of mine got the rail bed back on some land he had. They loaded up the gravel and fill on trucks and sold it to the county for road work. As the got down to the original grade they found the it had been built right on top of the black top soil. Of course this was just a small branch line and was never intended for major train traffic.
There was complicated system of subsidies that encouraged the RR to build track in the cheapest possible fashion and then if need be fix it next year or 10 years later or maybe never depending on traffic. It was something that politicians figured out. Of course there was mad scramble to settle the land and to keep the Yanks away too!!


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