Tire bulge

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Tire bulge
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Hamlin on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 02:16 pm:

I have firestone whites on my C-cab that have like new tread.
One of the fronts (30 x 3) has a small bulge on the inner part of the tread. I should say it's about the size of a half dollar.
I'd really rather not replace it at this time.
Does anyone make a repair boot like they used to use in bygone days?
Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Gelfer on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 04:45 pm:

Either get more life insurance, or buy a new tire. How much is your life worth to you?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By coreywalker on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 08:12 pm:

There is some type of boot/ patch that they put on the insides of mdern tires. Maybe a tractor shop would have something, tractor tires are high and repair would be better than buying a tire. However when those high pressure tires blow, they blow. I just added air in this one, pulled up on the crank (it was on a different car) and it sounded like a shotgun. I thought I'd blown the head off, then I saw the tire. That would have been bad going down the road. post


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 10:09 pm:

Mark,

If you have the same demountable wheels and rims on your C-Cab that are shown on your profile, I suspect they are 30 x 3 1/2 on all four wheels.

White tires are more costly than the black ones so if you drive it a lot you may want to consider another set of rims with “black drivers” on them. If you are not planning to drive the car in the Colorado winter (I probably would not take that nice of a car out in the snow – but I’m picky) – just put a jack stand under it and let the air out until the bulge goes away. Figure out what you want to purchase (1 or 2 white tires or 4 or 5 black tires). Order a few months before you need them.

Tire boots are available but you may have problems finding a source for only one. See: Camel boot from Grangers
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/search.shtml?searchQuery=1EKY2&op=search&Nt t=1EKY2&N=0&sst=All they also have a 1EKY1 for nail holes.
And:
http://www.patchrubber.com/tire_repair/12142.html

You may find it is easier to dismount your tire and take it to an auto / truck tire repair location and have them install an appropriate boot.

However, you didn’t mention anything about why the bulge appeared. If the tire hit something, then other parts may be damaged and waiting to fail. If you didn’t hit anything – then it may be old and waiting to fail? We have all had times when we needed to save money – but tires, spokes, and items that if they failed could cost you, your loved ones, or others their lives is not the best place to take unnecessary chances. If the tire repair place it comfortable that a boot will work – great. But if you are making the call yourself with no prior experience in this field – that could be a high risk decision.

If the tire is other wise in good shape, a boot could make it serviceable. And it might make sense to “boot it” and keep it for a spare. But a good used tire would probably be a safer bet. And a new tire would be the best option if it is in the budget. And a safe black tire would better than a wreck with a matching bad white tire.

I'm sure you will sort it out to something that works safely for you. If you are only driving it on and off the trailer -- just about anything would do. Same for a slow parade etc. Montana 500 -- you would want the better tires.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Jeffrey Cole on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 10:30 pm:

Corey,What kind of crew cab is that behind the T?
Looks like a International travel all to some degree.Either way I like it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By coreywalker on Monday, December 28, 2009 - 10:44 pm:

Mack, It's a 73 International Travelette. 3/4 ton 392 V8. A guy wanted $200 for it but then he just let me have it for free. Just wanted it out of his pasture. I put a push rod, points, condenser, plugs and brakes on it, then I took off the bed, put on some duals and put my welder on it and retired my old Chevrolet. The IHC is great- no power steering, power brakes or any of that stuff to go out and cost a lot of money. Even has a solid front axle. Plus it's unusual, just don't see them anymore. It needs paint, but the price was right and it runs super.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 12:17 pm:

We had some smooth white T Drivers that were only a couple years old a couple years ago that had little bulges on them and when they finally broke open, it was a layer of gooey white unvulcanized rubber just above the cords that was working around and causing them. It wasn't worth sending them back and trying to get them warrantied because they had a few thousand miles on them before they started doing that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 01:20 pm:

When I was a teenager in the Missouri Ozarks the roads were rocky and rough. Most of the flats were caused by breaks in the tread area and we would put in a small, medium,large or extra large boot and patch the tube. In our area there were not a freeway insight and you drove maybe 50 on the straightaway. Now the roads are banked, blacktopped and best you could ask for.
We lived north of Mansfield, Missouri, home of the Late Laura Ingalls Wilder, noted for her "Little House On the Prairie" books, and a great museum to see along with the little house she lived in.
This forum is the greatest for cit chat and good informatio


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 02:43 pm:

Mark:

Using a boot will work if there is not too much damage to the inside. I would borrow a tire spreader from some one in your club or a tire store and take a very close look inside the tire all the way around. I used Firestone for a number of years and had so much trouble with the bead separating on the two rear wheels of my Center Door that I switched to Universal T Drivers and only had one bead separate in the last 10 or so years. And yes my rims are mint as good as they came from the factory. A center door is one of the heaviest Ts. If none of your friends have a tire spreader get someone with a strong grip to spread the tire.

A373a

This is only one type of tire spreader. Ken Tool Co. Akron, Ohio T53

A373b
A373c


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Hamlin on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 02:52 pm:

Dave,
Thanks for the info.
It's too cold to get it out of my storage garage right now, but when I do I'll get the tire off & go from there.
The bulge hasn't gotten any worse in the last 6 months or so.
I might end up getting 2 new fronts.
Any whites available that are better?
Off subject Dave, how about posting some pics of your 16 touring that I did top & upholstery on.
Al Krusnik says you have it finished.
Thanks, Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 08:49 pm:

Argueing which tire is b etter is like argueing which oil to use, every one has their own idea. I understand that both Goodyear and Universal are being made in Viet Nam, maybe at the same factory.

What ever you do when you get ready to mount what ever tires you end with come up to Berthoud and I will help you mount your tires I do have a couple of tools that make it a lot easier.

I use a weaver Tire Changer. No working on the floor breaking my back.

A378a Tire Changer

I also use two Sioux Tire Clamps. The will help keep the bead on the tire from sliping off when you are working on the other half of the tire.

A378b Sioux Tire Clamp

The shows how the clamp is used. I carry two of them in all my Ts with 30 inch tires. And keep two in the shop.

I use the Dayton Tire Clamp to break beads so I can get a tire tool between the rim and tire bead.

A379d Dayton Tire Clamp

One of these could also be used like the Sioux Tire tool to keep the bead from slipping off but it is so slow that I only use it to break beads.

A379e Dayton tire clamp on Tire

This tool is called the Giant Hand. It is for rolling the bead into the rim.

A379f Giant Hand

Last but not least is the Tire Too (spud) you can buy these at any tire shop and some parts stores. I also carry a couple of these in my Ts in case I get a flat miles from home and keep two in my shop.

A379 Tire Tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 09:46 pm:

Mark:

I will try again.

Weaver Tire changer

A378a

Sioux Clamp

A378b Sioux Clamp

Sioux clamp on Tire
A378c

Dayton Tire Clamp
A378d

Dayton Tire Clamp on Tire
A378e

Giant Hand used for rolling bead into rim
A379f

Tire Iron
A379g


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 10:16 pm:

Mark:

Every one that looks at the upholstery and top that you did can't say enough about how good a job The Golden Needle did. You are to be congradulated. I will try and post some pictures of your work.

A365e 16 in front of shop

Entrance to Rocky Mountain National park
A143 Entrance
A143b Entrance

Many Park overlook the road is closed from here to the park.

A145 road closed sign

Front of 16
A374a Motor meter

Front of top
A374b front of top

Front Seat
A374c Front Seat

Back Seat
A375d Back Seat

Back of Top
A376e Back of Top



\image


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 10:37 pm:

I think the best thing to do would be to circle the areas where there is a bulge then take the demounted tires to a reputable tire place that has the equipment with which to apply a hot patch large enough to completely bridge the area under each bulge on the inside of the tire. That should offer enough support to bring the bulge back down flat.

A hot patch basically involves a special clamp that heats the patch and make it a part of the rubber of the tire so that it will never separate. If you don't have a hot patch applied, the bulge will return when it pulls away from the patch once air is introduced and it is stretched. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Tuesday, December 29, 2009 - 10:56 pm:

Mark:

I will try again to post some pictures of your work on the 16.

A365e In front of shop

Front of 16
A374a Motor Meter

Front of Top
A374b front of top

Front Seat
A374c Front Seat

Back Seat
A375d back seat

Back of Top
A375e back of top


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 01:03 pm:

Where do you get a hot patch installed??? I didn't think anybody did that sort of thing any more...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick - (2) '26's - Bartow, FL on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 01:30 pm:

Adam, Thank you for challenging me to research further. You are correct. It is no longer done. I should have done my research before posting my suggestion. I called TCI here in Mulberry where I had mine done several years ago to find out if they still had the equipment to do it and the Manager told me DOT no longer allows them to perform hot patch tire repairs, anymore.

I described the bulge problem and he said that, even if they were allowed to do it, he doubts it would correct a bulge, because bulges are normally caused by a separation of the cords within the tire and a patch that bridged the bulge would not pull down a bulge that was caused by a cord separation within the tire. He said that in his professional opinion, there is nothing that will make a bulging tire safe to drive on. I'm sorry to steer you all wrong. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Hamlin on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 05:16 pm:

Dave, Thanks for the plug.
The car looks really good all finished.
What kind of 'dogbone' is that under the motormeter? Looks like marbles on the ends.

Hap, I'm pretty sure the front tires are 30 x 3.
I'll have to check next time I'm over there.
I'd have my T in my shop if I didn't have so many customer cars in here.
Bummer

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 08:26 pm:

Mark;
Those are marbles, I picked up the marbles and the other two pieces at three swap meets. I think maybe the arms might be for some other car. Anyway the marbles already had a hole in them so I just glued the marbles on the arms.

A374g marbles


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