A Pictorial Chronology of the Most Famous Car in the World

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: A Pictorial Chronology of the Most Famous Car in the World
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 10:55 am:

by Robert C. Kreipke.

Anybody got a copy of this yet? Is it worth buying to add to my groaning shelves of Ford books?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce McCalley on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 12:41 pm:

Robert C. Kreipke is the historian for the Ford Motor Company. This book has many photos which have not been seeen before. It does not detail the changes in the Model T but is a photographic journey through the Model T era. Well worth the cost in my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 01:04 pm:

Sounds just my style Bruce, my pal & I will be buying, thanks for the advice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By "Hap" (Harold) Tucker on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 01:44 pm:

Jem,

I was fortunate that Santa brought me that book as well as Robert Casey's "The Model T -- A Centennial." Both have good photos but the Kreipke's book uses the large photos to tell the story and has very little text in comparison to Casey's book that tends to have smaller photos but much more excellent text to describe the story. I like them both.

Of course both have some of the pictures we have seen before. But that is one of the beauties of both books -- they will share something that we missed in the photo in the past -- or we will see it our selves for the first time.

For example on page 18 of Kreipke's book they have an 8 1/2 by 7 1/4 photo of the Model Ts at the 1908 New York Automobile Show at the Grand Central Palace. That is the same photo that is cropped a little smaller and printed approximately 4 1/4 by 3 1/4 on page 57 of Stern’s “Tin Lizzie.” While it is a grainy and appears to have been "from a blown up section of a photo" it shows more details than the “Tin Lizzie” version. I was hoping to be able to see the early style frame bracket on the first car the Laundalet, but the bracket is not quiet clear enough (cropped copy attached) due to the process they use on photos so they print in books better.

1

While the crank is down on the Landaulet second car back in the photo a mother-in-law runabout clearly had the crank dutifully stored in the upright position. In “Tin Lizzie” the position of the crank handle on the second car is not nearly as clear.

Both books have a few minor errors. Some correct themselves on the same page as sometimes they show the lower right hand corner of the original photograph. Ford Films often put the date the photo was taken or developed (not sure which) in the lower right hand corner. So when Casey on page 67 has “Final painting of bodies, 1914…” and the picture is dated 3-30-15 it makes it easier to figure out a closer date. Or looking at the TT trucks on page 70 of Kreipke’s where they are shown under the 1915 area and a note “Many Model T’s were modified into delivery trucks. Aftermarket fabrication shops would lengthen the chassis….” The note is true but they are clearly TT black radiator chassis fitted with aftermarket bodies and not the car chassis with a Smith Form a Truck or similar earlier option. Again both books only have a few of those types of “oops.” And I know I have many more than that on any typical day. And some of the photos are common between the two books so it is nice to be able to compare them.

Both are nice books. Because of your research on the T’s helping out with the “English Model T Ford” book, I don’t think either will add much to your 1909-1910 information. It is covered briefly in both books (actually in most books for that matter). But both books have corrected some items that have been published incorrectly in the past – such as the “body drop picture” where the bodies were only placed on the car to take it to the waiting railroad boxcar and not for final assembly etc. But for someone new to Model Ts who wants some great background information on the Ts – I believe Kreipke provides an easier format and summary while Casey provides many more written details about how they were produced and life was back then.

If both you and another friend are considering purchasing Model T books I would suggest you consider each obtaining a different copy and sharing.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap Tucker l9l5 Model T Ford touring cut off and made into a pickup truck and l907 Model S Runabout. Sumter SC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 02:49 pm:

I like Kreipkes book, but I think he should have paid attention to detail being Fords "Historian". As far as dates go, he is off on almost every page.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr. on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 04:45 pm:

I bought the book at the museum this past summer. I've enjoyed it very much. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce McCalley on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 05:10 pm:

None of the Model T books are 100% accurate...not even mine. All have mis-dated pictures and text somewhere. Tom Collins' book is partuculary bad in this respect but is still quite interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 10:30 pm:

My signed copy is not perfect but what if they asked me about spelling?? It's only money now but in years to come?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jack daron-Indy. on Wednesday, December 30, 2009 - 11:41 pm:

While we're discussing books,I got a book for Christmas,called the American Machinist Memories. Autos from 1913-15,From Lindsay publications. It is full of nice pictures and articles from the Ford assembly plants ,including some Dodge Bros stuff. Try www.lindsaybks.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, December 31, 2009 - 01:16 am:

Bruce funny you should say that today about Tom Collins' book. I got a gift card for Borders Books and used it to buy that book just recently for Christmas. I was looking at it today and was puzzled by what I read on page 117. It states that Ford won the legal battle against the Selden Patent on Sept 15 of 1909. I don't know the day of the year but I thought it was 1911.

Ken you are right. The printed word is important to be correct. Years from now someone could lose a bar bet or at least have a good argument after reading something that was written wrong.(Spelling aside).

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome R. Hoffman, Hays KS on Thursday, December 31, 2009 - 01:22 am:

I too picked up my copy at Greenfield Village last year in May on a trip to Michigan. There are many photos that I have not seen in any other book, as well as many we all have seen. I now have Tom Collins book and both are eye candy I think for the money this is a better book. To be fair I got Tom C book discounted of eBay and no compliants on price.


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