Need help identifying coil

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2009: Need help identifying coil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sherwood Morse on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 01:26 pm:

Hello,
First, thanks for this wonderful service to collectors of old T's. I have a coil which I had previously assumed was not a Ford coil but in searching for information on the web I found photos of a Kingston model t coil which looks somewhat similar. The short dimensions are the same as all the model t Ford coils but the coil is much taller, a total of about 6-1/4 inches. I will attempt to add a photo to this post but in case it doesn't work, I can email a photo or provide a web address where I have the photo. Thanks in advance for your help.Photo of coil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 02:02 pm:

Sherwood, During the Model T period there were other brands of coils made for non Model T engines in all different sizes for both mobile, marine and stationary engines. You could go to any of the antique engine sites for more facts if you cannot get the information here.....Michael Pawelek


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 07:47 pm:

I am no expert in early Model T coils and would defer to Randall Anderson who works with them all the time. But, I did some digging in my library today and the above pictured coil appears to be the Kingston coil used in late 1910/1911 Model T's. I am not sure of the part number as my information is not complete.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 08:44 pm:

Hi Sherwood: Your coils appears to be as Ron suggests. It carries the Ford part number T-4232. This coil replaced the so-called "high bridge" Kingston coil used in 1909 and into about mid 1910. The T-4232 in turn was superceded by the T-4238, which is the so-called "low bridge" style that is adjusted in the opposite manner from usual: the adjusting nut is TIGHTENED to REDUCE the primary's amp draw. Your T-4232 is not too common; the previous and the later Kingstons are the ones usually found. But they are common enough that we did produce a run of points for them, so new ones are available.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 09:30 pm:

Between R.V. Anderson and "Ron the Coilman", the coil has been identified for Mr. Morse, so I don't feel like I'm "hijacking" this thread, however, I have somewhat of a question for one or the other of those fellows:

Having worked for a railroad police dept. for 34 years, something in the back of my mind thinks that there were (and maybe still are) railroad motorcars (usually called "speeders" by the public) that used coils similar to Model T Ford coils. I'm wondering if they were the same as "T" coils and therefore useable in a Model T, or if they are just "similar". I'm not sure of this either, but I think the railroad motorcar (or speeder) was a 2 cyl. Fairmont, with hand throttle and spark advance, which was used by section men and signal maintainers.

Ron....? or R.V.Anderson,.....?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 09:44 pm:

Harold
As you know Fairmont made railroad motorcars.
There is a whole hobby surrounding these vehicles. The original vehicles used a ignition coil similar to Model T coils made for Fairmont by KW ignition Company.
The mounting was a bit different, but the function was exactly the same. I have restored many Fairmont coils for the railroad motor car hobby.
A fellow Model T'er, Carl Megonigle is big into this hobby. I will ask Carl for electronic photos and post them.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 10:00 pm:

I should have known that you'd know all about them. Something I always wondered about,...........thanx Ron


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 10:23 pm:

Harold
You would be surprised how many different applications this coil design was used for: Fence chargers, Roofing tar heater ignition, WWII flame thrower ignition, 1950/60 Champion spark plug testers and on and on.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 11:43 pm:



Ron, Here's another use of the Model T coil.

Trembler spark Ignition start for the 60's Red Head Jet Engine used for model aircraft. My brother had one of these and I used a spare coil to start it up, you needed ear plugs for sure :-)

Once you got it started, no need for the coil, that jet got hot!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson on Friday, February 20, 2009 - 11:54 pm:

Dan
Yes, I forgot that one and likely a few more.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Saturday, February 21, 2009 - 02:24 am:

Sounds like when you get tired of rebuilding coils, you could write a book! I knew about the fence thing, but not that other stuff. I guess you're right; I would be surprised! Interesting Ron,.....Thanx,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dave willis on Saturday, February 21, 2009 - 04:44 am:

weren't those called "dynajets"??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sherwood Morse on Saturday, February 21, 2009 - 10:36 am:

Thanks much for the information about my coil. It's nice being able to pick the brains of the pros. Thanks again. Sherwood


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Saturday, February 21, 2009 - 05:21 pm:

Although it didn't originally use a T coil, I adapted one, a number of years ago, to power a countertop cigar lighter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 03:32 pm:

"used by section men and signal maintainers"

Harold, I resemble that remark. Got rid of my jigger in 1990 and was happy to see it go at the time. I regret not trying to buy it now as the motor car hobby appears to be quite active. It sucks having to use them at work, but it would be a great way to see some scenery on vacation time. I don't remember how fast it went but I think they should have been capable of 40 mph if a person was dumb enough to try it. All you'd need was a high crossing plank to throw you in the bush !!

Now I crawl into my ton truck (no, not a TT) with hydraulic hyrail equipment and ride in comfort.

Regards,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 03:37 pm:

Garnet - Not always a high crossing plank! Back in the '70's when I was a member of the CMSt P&P Police Dept. (Milwaukee Road) I had a vandalism case in Missoula, MT. whereby a kid had jammed a tie plate into a mainline switch. I eventually caught the kid responsible and his explanation for his actions was that he just wanted to see what would happen when a train hit the piece of metal (tie plate). What he didn't count on was the fact that the first piece of equipment across that obstructed switch was not a train (heavy), but was a signal maintainer in his motorcar (light). The motorcar went over on it's side and put the signal maintainer in the hospital. We successfully prosecuted the kid thru' local juvenile authorities (the case went to a diversion committee) and the kid was in pretty serious trouble at home too as he had darn good parents and an expecially strict father. No more vandalism in that area of Missoula thereafter!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 07:16 pm:

You mean you Montanans have CONSEQUENCES for misbehavior?? What are you, SAVAGES??? That poor lil' kid.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 07:56 pm:

R.V. - Don't get me started! Juvenile vandalism was a big part of my job as a RR cop for 34 years; 4 yrs Chicago, 8 yrs. Montana and my last 22 yrs. Seattle/Tacoma, WA. I'm not sure there's such a thing as a bad kid, but there sure as heck are some bad parent(s)! Anywhere I've ever worked! Some kids just don't have a chance, and, some people just plain never should have had kids! I like to think that perhaps during those 34 years, I might have been a good influence on at least a few kids that were not getting any guidence at home!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 10:04 pm:

Harold, I teach, or try to teach, high school English in a school for emotionally disturbed youth and juvenile offenders. This is my 13th year in this setting and 17th altogether as an educator. Until this year, I was one of the very few staff who hadn't been assaulted. The list of what I legally can't do to or with an 18 or 19 year old "child" who is a head taller and 80 lbs. heavier than I would fill several hundred NYC phone books. And that's not touching what the COPS can't do.

All societies will reap what they sow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 10:31 pm:

R.V. - I don't know how you and other educators do it! I had an experience in Chicago, many years ago, and I'll never forget it! I caught a 7 year old kid stealing out of a freighthouse, and HE ADVISED ME of his rights! No, that's not a "typo"! This 7 year old kid knew the Miranda Warnings perfectly, word for word, and he didn't read them off of a card that he carried either! That boy had a rap sheet you wouldn't believe! No,.....wait a minute,.......you're a teacher,.......YOU would believe it!

This discussion (which maybe we should quit) reminds me of how it used to be years ago. I'd begin to get "pretty close" during an investigation involving juveniles, and I'd go and have a meeting with the school principal (or is is principle ?) and he'd tell me something like, "come back after lunch and I'll have a couple boys in my office that are gonna' want to talk to you". I'd come back and in 10 or 15 minutes, case closed! That was THEN! Nowdays, well,...... the last thing I should talk to you, a teacher about R.V., is "no backing" by school administrations, right?


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration