Backward steps when improving the T

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Backward steps when improving the T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 02:48 am:

The early open valve Ts were soon improved with the adoption of the two piece valve covers in 1911. No more need to oil the tappets and clean up after a run.
Then some lame brain decided that a one piece side plate would be even better. Wrong!! Even with the radiator removed from Henrietta, I still had some difficulty getting the side plate off. Fortunately, the studs came out when I undid the nuts. This allowed me to slide the cover forward between the block and intake manifold. The fact that someone had deleted the sideplate gasket no doubt contributed to the thick covering of oil soaked grunge on the engine pan.
Come time to refit the plate I had further problems. The studs had a shoulder on the inner threads which allowed the studs to be wound in until the shoulder reached the block. The trouble is with the studs in place the cover could not be slid in.
So I tried putting the studs in the cover and juggling them, the gasket and the plate in together, and screwing the studs in once all was in position. I needed three more hands.

Back to the spares bin for some studs without shoulders, so they could be inserted once I had the plate and gasket in place. This required making two half nuts to jam on the thread so the studs could be wound in. Then the jam nuts were removed and the proper nuts installed. What a rigmarole to go through.

And, instead of two oil and dust proof valve chambers, we now have one chamber, open through to the other side of the block, with a bloody great hole in the plate and gasket to accommodate the throttle linkage on those cars which drive on the wrong side of the road.

None of this applies with the two piece side plates.

Are there other examples of such backward steps in the development of the T?

Grumpy from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 04:18 am:

Happy New Year Allan B!
That is one of the reasons I prefer earlier Ts. Although several of the cars I have had did have the one-piece side cover.
I can't think of anything else that had quite the backwards step of the side covers. Many minor changes over the years actually were minor improvements. I suspect the side cover change made a savings of a minute or two per car on the machining and assembly lines. But that would be just a guess.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 01:52 pm:

Happy New Year Allan
You really are in a grumpy mood. :-)
Try working an 09 - nothing fits quite right. I mean even the main bolt holes are not in alignment. :-(

(Message edited by Tony_bowker on January 01, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Clary on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 03:16 pm:

Ford didn't make changes to improve the car, they made changes to make more money.

Andy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 03:38 pm:

Cost saving was a must but in 1909 many things were learned and changed on the go? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 04:46 pm:

It's a pain, but take off the gen. The plate will then just drop down and twist a little to lift out. Or take off the intake.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, January 01, 2018 - 05:29 pm:

Mark, taking off the generator on a RHD car is a problem in itself. First order of business is to remove the engine side pan, as the generator has to come out the bottom to clear the steering column. Then, if you are lucky, on some cars there is no need to drop the intake manifold to get the generator out. I did not want to disturb decades of accumulated grunge on Henrietta to do all this.

Likewise, I am loathe to disturb a pair of well fitted manifolds at the best of times, although this may well be the answer in most cases.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By WilliamThomas Forsythe on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 05:48 pm:

I'd like to add into the discussion what is considered to be a "forward step" by Henry, when he finally in '26 on the "Improved Car"; mounted ears on the Hogshead and bosses on the upper rear of the block so the transmission could be bolted solidly to the engine, thus saving many crankshafts from breakage due to the pan flexing.
Having broken a crank in our '12 Touring in the first year after restoration, I was determined to save the new counterbalance Scat crankshaft from the such fate, while at the same time,retaining my original '12 block! To this end I designed a simple support plate of 1/4" Cold Rolled Steel for use on all such early 09 to 25 blocks, that does the same job of fixing the transmission solidly to the block. Locally, I've installed this modification on several early blocks of our members, with total satisfaction. Perhaps I should start marketing the item so others can also benefit? Regards, Tom Forsythe


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration