Running in 8 Degree Weather

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Running in 8 Degree Weather
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 03:44 pm:

Just a short video clip of Nellie running in 8 degree weather here in Rochester. Taken while it was warming up prior to an hour long drive. Brrr. Note the new spare tire cover I made a few weeks ago.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=wy38pTTq5Ug


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 04:01 pm:

Are you kidding me Mark? I wussed out driving my '14 runabout yesterday in 29 degree south/central Texas weather. Built a mesquite fire in the fireplace and brewed a pot of coffee instead. My hats off to you and all other T hobbiests living - indeed, thriving - in the otherwise uninhabitable northlands.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 04:07 pm:

It is invigorating isn't it? I'm glad you are enjoying it that way. I am envious of that wonderful old upholstery also. Great video of it.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 04:53 pm:

Yes, if I were a brass monkey I'd be in real trouble. Still, it's not as bad as the Northern states that often measure temps in negative numbers. As long as you have a good hat and ear muffs ... it's not too bad.

I have discovered that black cotton drill painted with thinned semigloss Rustoleum is an excellent replacement / patch option for weathered original leatherette material. I used this for the spare tire cover seen in the video. Looks like vintage material.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 05:07 pm:

Mark you should also take the T to Delta Sonic Main St to get all that Rochester Salt off the car. Lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 06:25 pm:

Yes, there is a lot of salt on it. Would love to wash it off ... but not away from home ... or Iíll just get more salt on it on the drive home. Iíll get one of those collapsible hoses to hook up at home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert - Granby ,CT on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 06:58 pm:

Mark if you are going to drive it in the salt do your self a favor and spray fluid film on the underside of the 23 to keep the salt from eating your car thats why my T's don't go out in the winter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 07:13 pm:

That little bugger does roar. :-)
That spare tire cover really looks good!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 09:27 pm:

Once I got it started I brought up the idle a little to get the engine good and hot. The winterfront on the radiator is also buttoned tight. Then I open the front a little and back off on the idle and it drives beautifully.

I washed the underside with a hose and rosette and wiped it down today. Hate the salt they use on the roads up here. What is fluid film? Is it easy to remove when you donít need it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert - Granby ,CT on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 09:41 pm:

I'll call you tommorrow night and let you know


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 09:49 pm:

I thought it was a cold drive in my 30 A coupe Sunday morning here in north georgia it was 11degrees. My Ts won't get much driving this winter. Looks fun though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, January 02, 2018 - 10:30 pm:

You, Sir, are of a hardy breed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By vincent bassani Califon, NJ on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 08:09 am:

Took my coupe out the other day. She runs great in 14į weather


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By vincent bassani Califon, NJ on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 02:21 pm:

why do my photos look upright on my phone and rotated on my pc ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 03:39 pm:

"why do my photos look upright on my phone and rotated on my pc ?"

Because of the phone orientation. Try loading to a PC first, rotate if necessary on the PC in Windows photo viewer, or other photo software, then post it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By vincent bassani Califon, NJ on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 03:43 pm:

my hound loves winter cruising in the open express

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9Qom7ZJVc0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom_k on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 04:44 pm:

Mark, You must be new to the Central NY area. I lived there many years until my recent move to Utah. I've had many years experience in Central NY salt covered roads. If you value your car, and it's historic history, you do not want to drive it in the salt. No matter how good you flush the water when you're done driving it, you will never get all the salt out of the cracks and crevices. It will eventually do a number on your car. I'd hate to see a car as nice looking as yours being ruined that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 07:08 pm:

Tom correction Western NY. Rochester NY. Same salt same damage to the cracks and crevices


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Friday, January 05, 2018 - 09:00 pm:

Mark, Fluid film is pretty much just lanolin in a spray can or gallon size to brush on. I was developed for the navy as a rust inhibitor just prior to WWII. I use the stuff all over the place to keep rust off or add a little lube. It is thicker than oil so it forms a film on surfaces.
I am not so sure it would be easy to remove, but it is mostly natural and does not seem to bother paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 07:52 am:

Tom K is correct. Having owned a collision service and taught auto-body for BOCES, a New York State trade school. Iíve seen the results of salt first hand. Even with the professional undercoating systems I have seen, they are better than nothing but the product does not get in all the cracks and seems. Take a quarter panel or door skin off a car and you will see this. The only thing Iíve seen that will creep into every crack and crevice is used engine oil. I spray it with an undercoat gun. I use it on all my cars. When I restore any of my cars, I spray it one time after the restoration is done. The problem even with oil, it protects the inter-panels but washes off the under-body so that will still rust. From seeing what salt will do firsthand, I wonít take any of my old cars out until weíve had a few heavy rains to wash the salt away. Even in the summer it is not unusual to see salt stains in cracks in the roads. If you value your car keep it out of the salt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 10:54 am:

Only thing I can say is, its when the melting
starts, gets a little warm, its the slush puddles
etc. I see no harm when its like here below '0'
roads are dry maybe a little white. Cars from
20s 30s are not as prone to salt cause they
don't have "catch alls" like mid to 1960's do.
Body shops scored on rocker panels quarters
head light falling out on 3-4yr old vehicles
remember that....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 11:33 am:

Salt does not hurt a car if it is dry.

To minimize body damage from salt in the winter, it's better to have an unheated garage than a heated garage.

I bought a gallon can of Fluid Film for 50 cents at an estate sale a few years ago but have yet to use it on anything. As Zachary mentioned, it has lanolin in it.

I had two neighbors (brothers that lived next door to each other but now deceased) who used to spray the undersides of their cars with used motor oil every fall. They also drilled holes in the doors of their cars and sprayed inside those as well.

A few months ago, a daughter gave me a bunch of their old tools which included the greasy spray gun that they used to shoot motor oil under their cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 06:44 pm:

Samuel and Erik,

You are partially correct. The problem is if you are driving on dry white roads, the white is of course dry salt, which is now fine salt dust. As you drive through it, like driving on a dirt road it raises the dust which in turn gets into everything, including all the cracks and crevices. Any dampness in the air, a damp garage, driving on damp or wet roads after this puts the salt dust into action.

You are right that 50s and 60s cars have more catchalls to hold the salt, but Tís are not immune.

Many Tís are rusted out. The big causeís are the environment they have been in and when mice and other critters build nests in them.

It is a shame that any car that has survived as long as our Tís have, are then purposely driven in such a corrosive environment.

Unless you have been in the auto body repair business or lived your life in an area that uses salt, you may not realize what damage you are doing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 07:03 pm:

Well, yes ... I have lived in the Northeast all my life. I don't generally drive my Ts in the salted snow for all the reasons mentioned above. This was unusual for me though years ago I lived in Penna on 600 acre campus that was never salted and drive it there all the time in the winter. I did neutralize, wash, dry and then oil the crevices and nether regions of the car after that jaunt last week.

I will maintain the T all year because eventually there will be rain washing off the streets and we will have days when there is snow on the grass but not on the pavement, which is usually when I drive in the winter. I was just curious how this T compared with driving my old speedster in the snow. It drove much easier ... due to the extra weight I'm thinking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Peternell on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 07:24 pm:

That's a peach!! Sounds sweet in the "cooler air"!!


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