Magnet Metallurgy

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Magnet Metallurgy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 03:12 pm:

Does anyone know the metallurgy content of the flywheel magnets?
Are there any trace elements included, specifically Tungsten?

Thanks.
Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 06:24 pm:

Bob,

I have never looked into original magnets as to composition.

However, Ford had a 'magnet steel' in the arsenal that was listed as

.82 -.90 Carbon
.30-45 Manganese
2.5 - 2.6 Chrome
.25 - .40 Silicon
Normal trace of Phosphorous
Normal trace of Sulphur

There is no footnote on the material spec as to other allowances.

Someone 'may' have the drawing, and it 'may' say something different.

This would by modern definition be a semi-steel with controlled silicon that is higher than the old fashioned trace allowance of steels.

Look up 'silicon steel'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 07:05 pm:

Maybe there are SS magnets available...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 07:56 pm:

Thanks George.

The reason I asked is that I was on a non-automotive form discussing the recharging of magnets.
One participant was sure he was recharging Tungsten magnets.
Tungsten is paramagnetic (just barely attracted to a magnet).
He alleged that Model T magnets had tungsten in them.
Now I have some ammo to fire back with.
Don't mess with Henery :-)

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 08:46 pm:

Bob, See if either of these tables from the Henry Ford Trade School metallurgy texts (vintage 1938) have what you are looking for:

Ferrous Alloy Chart

application/pdfFerrous Alloy Chart
Ferrous Alloy Chart 2018.pdf (202.6 k)


Non-Ferrous Alloy Chart
application/pdfNon-Ferrous Alloy Chart
Non-Ferrous Alloys.pdf (46.3 k)


(I have this information in Excel format, too.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 08:55 pm:

Thomas,

Thank you for the data.
It clearly defined the Magnet recipe.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, January 06, 2018 - 08:56 pm:

Maybe anecdotal but article by Murray Fahnestock states the Ford magneto magnets as being tungsten steel......


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