OT pattern making

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: OT pattern making
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ralph Fitz-Gerald on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 09:30 am:

I am looking for some help in learning how to make a pattern for a fronty style intake manilfold. I am also looking for a small foundry that would be willing to cast these in aluminum . Stay warm everyone only 65 days until mud season.
Fitz


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 12:01 pm:

One pretty classic text on pattern making is
WOOD PATTERN MAKING by Herbert J. McCaslin.
The publisher was McGraw-Hill.
Mine is a 4th edition and the copyright is 1951.

Hope this helps. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 01:20 pm:

First step is to become knowledgeable about foundry practice and the problems involved with casting such a piece.

Next step is to find a foundry that's willing to work with you on a "labor of love". The rewards are well worth the journey, good luck, and keep us posted on your progress, please !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 01:48 pm:

You should talk to John Steele. He had the roof competition exhaust manifold s cast in anaconda Mt at the foundry there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 04:44 pm:

Go to the American Foundry Society website. You can search for a foundry that casts what you need. Warning: there are very few foundries left that will cast very small runs. Most foundries are going the way of steel mills....
"Practical Wood Patternmaking" by J. Robert Hall, McGraw-Hill 1943. My reprint copy is from Lindsay Publications, now out of business.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Royster on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 05:17 pm:

Cattail Foundry in Gordonville PA is an excellent pattern maker and foundry. Amish and quality is excellent and affordable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 05:49 pm:

http://wiki.vintagemachinery.org/FoundrySources.ashx

Wow, thanks Mike. I googled them and found this web site with other small foundries!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 06:26 pm:

I’ve dealt with foundries for my entire career of making things including casting new special model T blocks.
If you were closer I could provide you with some good guidance in person
Couple of thoughts;
1. If you are only going to make a few copies then seriously consider the lost wax process. Essentially you make a wax (the wax is a special type) version. The wax then has the “gating “ attached and then the whole thing is encased in special ceramic. The was is melted out and the ceramic is fused and then the molten metal is poured in. Obviously there are a bunch of details.
Also consider casting it in several parts and then weld it together.
If you would really like to do this yourself and like to learn new skills then I can suggest a 3 week REALLY INTENSIVE course. You will put in about 60 hours per week and you will be “hands-on “ for the entire process. The course is primarily targeted at bronze objectives. But consider that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder “


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 06:49 pm:

Les, where is that three week course taught? Is it just lost wax and bronze? Does it cover pattermaking?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 06:55 pm:

Robert
It is a week of making the wax “sculpture “ (the object in wax)
Then 2 weeks of the rest of the process
Red Deer College “summer series” in July. I have attended several times


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 07:10 pm:

I should add that part of the process includes making a silicon mold of the wax so more copies can be produced


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 07:20 pm:

Thanks Les


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ralph Fitz-Gerald on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 07:24 pm:

Gentleman thanks for all of the information. The part I am interested in reproduce is a simple 90 degree fronty style intake. I have one now I need to reproduce one for me and couple more for other how make be interested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 07:35 pm:

Ralph
If you have one to copy, then the process is somewhat like this;
1. Make a silicone mold
2. Make a wax
3. In the process you will have to compensate for “shrinkage “
This can be addressed at several different stages


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Spyker on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 07:51 pm:

Perhaps using a 3-D printer could produce a pattern if more than one is required. Proper shrinkage could be plugged in from the start. Part lines, draft and pattern halves could be established per the foundry standard practices.
Pushtruck near Williams Grove


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 08:25 pm:

Wayne
If you have access to the modeling software and the printer it is DEFINITELY a viable method to make the “wax model “ ( which is obviously no longer wax!!)
The rest of the process remains essentially unchanged
The whole process can be a significant “learning opportunity “ ( which I really enjoy)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, January 07, 2018 - 08:30 pm:

Wayne
And yes it is a option to consider for making a sand casting pattern and core box.
I can recommend a aluminum foundry local to me that takes on my “odd ball” projects
Part of the decision is how much the person wants to do themselves and add to their personal knowledge and how much they just want to buy!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Monday, January 08, 2018 - 11:46 am:

Just FYI, Mark Herdeman down under has reproduced the 90 degree intake manifolds for SR Fronty heads in bronze. I believe there was a posting by Mark here on the forum 3-4 years ago. I don't know if has any more of them available, but the castings I received from him were very nice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mark herdman on Monday, January 08, 2018 - 06:32 pm:

Thanks Dan

Hope all is going well with you and your projects.

I do have a professionally made pattern and some spare Inlets, un-machined. they are an exact copy of an original later style for the Zenith U series and larger Winfield V series.

They are short manifolds so the carby and choke tube clears the starter motor (just). Early versions of inlet were longer for the L series Zenith carby (may not clear starter motor). All are interchangeable. I may have some spare U Series carby parts as well.

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Walters on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 01:36 pm:

.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 06:12 pm:

Jason, I see you are in Liberal, MO, have you made acquaintence with Charley Shaver? He is also in Liberal, MO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 12:48 am:

Just to add a bit more. Here is a picture of the Fronty intake elbow that Mark (sorry about the extra "e" above Mark) reproduced. This elbow is 1 3/4"id for the larger intake ports on the SR heads, which are 1 5/8" stock from what I can tell.

Seems Frontenac also made a smaller version with 1½" ID for the T, R and S heads. The picture below is an original that someone modified the carburetor side, but notice how the head side matches the design of Mark's reproduction elbow.
Until I compared this with Mark's part, I did not realize this was an original Fronty manifold that I have had for many years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 08:18 am:

I cheat at making patterns. The front cover uses an original Ford cover that had some material added to it for the additional features as well as for shrinkage (wood and bondo). The same for the side drive, started with a really bad original, modified it with some pieces of wood and bondo added some draft and ta-da a pattern. Enjoy




Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration