Old Photo - Rabbit story

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old Photo - Rabbit story
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 08:09 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 08:28 am:

Ohhhh, doze wasscally wabbits.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Kete on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 09:34 am:

Now the upholstery is full of fleas and ticks! They must not care about the paint because they have all those rabbits hung through the tire chains which are strung around the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 09:38 am:

"Just a little hunt" or If it moves....Kill It! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 09:46 am:

'Dat doctor hunts in his coupe too! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 10:13 am:

'Dat doctor probably gives all his patients a rabbits foot for good luck when he leaves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 10:20 am:

Doc ain't worried - he's treated Tularemia before . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 10:35 am:

Rich, I never heard of that rabbit disease before. I must have gotten "lucky" with the 100's of rabbits I raised as a kid.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 10:43 am:

Dean, I've never heard of it in domestic warrens; we used to raise rabbits too. Mostly it's responsible for "die offs" when wild populations get too large, humans can catch it . . . from flea and tick bites.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 11:20 am:

Good eating! Easy to skin and clean and if your careful and pick all the shot out of them very good! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 01:27 pm:

The last time I was rabbit hunting was about 15 years ago. It was a fresh snow and a great day. I limited out. I carry plastic bags to put them in and stuff them in my hunting vest. Got home with my catch and the wife was in the kitchen so I took the bags in to show her. Now my wife raises and trains search dogs and we have 3 or 4 in the house all the time. Well I opened the 1st bag and the flees swarmed out like black birds in the fall. Needless to say she was not impressed. Havent been bunny hunting since.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 02:24 pm:

Tularemia is common in our western black tailed jack rabbits (actually a hare). The things are so numerous in Nevada that no license is needed and the game officers beg you to shoot them!

In the early 1900's, the local ranchers here in Modoc held "rabbit drives" trying to protect their crops. Rabbits were driven by long lines of men across the sagebrush and were funneled into a huge wire corral built for the purpose. They didn't shoot them...shotgun shells were expensive.....they clubbed them to death. I'll bet those old boys were sure tired at the end of the day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 02:53 pm:

Dallas, I can imagine the "fun" you and your wife and her dogs had after trapping the fleas in those bags !! It's always amazed me how rapidly parasites leave the "sinking ship" . . . left to air out for awhile, the carcasses probably wouldn't have had many if any fleas left on 'em.

George, here in southeastern Idaho farms bordering the sagebrush desert have been plagued in cycles by jackrabbits since settlement. As recently as 1981, there was a plague of them, which led to the last rabbit drives held in these parts. It got national attention, and the horrified PETA types went into spasms over the barbaric clubbing of all those darling, fuzzy, cuddly little bunny-wabbits. Too bad they couldn't have been live-trapped and shipped en-masse to Central Park. Not long afterwards, efforts to control jackrabbit and coyote populations seem to have eliminated the sage grouse instead. Nowadays, when I ride the Arco Desert it's rare to see a jackrabbit - we see more cottontails than jacks, which I find strange, never saw them on the desert "in the old days".

Hm. How to keep this on topic ?? How about a comparison between the Apperson Jackrabbit and a Model T ?? ; )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 03:29 pm:

In 1959 I had a chance to visit the biggest privately-owned sheep station (that Aussie for "ranch") in New South Wales. Rabbits were a plague in Australia in those days. The station owner hired two guys whose full-time job was killing rabbits. The pelts were hung in bales and kept in a shed until they could be gathered and shipped to a furrier. While I was there, a semi arrived and collected 40 bales of rabbit pelts. He came twice a week.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 06:03 pm:

How about a jackrabbit clutch? There, the thread's back on topic! Do you hare me?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 06:41 pm:

Looks like they were using a pump 22, maybe a Model 10 12ga pump , (can't remember if it was a Remington for sure) and a Automatic that was probably a 12 ga of some sort.

Anybody recognize the guns for sure?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 07:10 pm:

Is the gun on the left a Winchester model 97?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 07:29 pm:

AK47s- all of 'em........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 07:41 pm:

The gun on the left is a Winchester Model 1912 or just Model 12 if newer. The center gun is a Browning Auto 5. The gun on the right is a .22 pump. Could be many domestic makes such as Winchester, Remington, Savage or others..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn - Lincoln, NE on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 07:44 pm:

It looks like the shotgun on the left is a Winchester Model 12 and the rifle on the right looks like a Winchester Model 62 .22 gallery rifle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 08:07 pm:

Ken....They b Jacks. Have never heard of anyone eating one. Almost no Jacks left in Kansas. I was stationed at Smokey Hill AFB (Shilling), Salina, Kansas. and Jackrabbits were getting scarce then. I heard they started using some kind of fertilizer on their wheat fields that killed off the rabbits (hares). Steve J, what say ye?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 03:35 pm:

John, Middle shotgun is Browning Auto-5 Looks like it's 20 Ga.
A-5 was avail. in 12,16 20 ga.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 04:31 pm:

All we had in central Mi were cottentails and the jacks were farther north.I think most critters tasted like what they ate.I used to carry a .22 squirell hunting but if you saw a rabit or partrige you lost out.Squirell's tasted very good but were work to skin.I used to trap a few muskrats and always wanted to eat one and my mother cooked one. It stank so we fed it to our bird dog and it died.Mallard ducks and Geese were also very good! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary J Giarratano on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 03:24 pm:

I used to hunt Jack rabbits and cotton tails with my dad and uncle in the San Lois Valley in Colorado in the 60s. This is a high mountain valley at 7,000 ft. The place had large amounts of rabbits in the sagebrush. The paved highway had road kill every 100 yards. I went there in high school about 1970 and ran across a dump with car parts and license plates. I didn't get any rabbits that day, but came home with some T parts and license plates from the 20s, 30s, and 40s. Some of them said T - xxxx. I found out later the T stood for truck, not Model T. I still have the plates hanging on my garage walls 48 years later. Wife thinks I'm crazy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary J Giarratano on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 03:28 pm:

I used to hunt Jack rabbits and cotton tails with my dad and uncle in the San Lois Valley in Colorado in the 60s. This is a high mountain valley at 7,000 ft. The place had large amounts of rabbits in the sagebrush. The paved highway had road kill every 100 yards. I went there in high school about 1970 and ran across a dump with car parts and license plates. I didn't get any rabbits that day, but came home with some T parts and license plates from the 20s, 30s, and 40s. Some of them said T - xxxx. I found out later the T stood for truck, not Model T. I still have the plates hanging on my garage walls 48 years later. Wife thinks I'm crazy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 05:04 pm:

Hi Gary,

Welcome to the forum!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 06:16 am:

I used to hunt, mostly to spend quality time with my lab. One time I came home with a Model T front wheel. It is still hanging in the barn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 08:07 am:

Gary, there are a lot of us on here where our wives think we are crazy. Welcome to the crazies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gus on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 09:32 am:

Looks like they hung them from tire chains.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration