Stripped a couple of spokes

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Stripped a couple of spokes
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 06:35 pm:

We had decided to strip the paint from the spokes of our wood wheels. Today I bought this at Harbor Freight.
It works well. I cleaned two spokes in just a few minutes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 06:46 pm:

Paint stripper works well also. Either way will work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 08:42 pm:

Tommy,

With all due respect, those sanding drums will destroy your spokes. Consider using stripper, as John suggests above.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 09:37 pm:

Tommy, listen to Jerry. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 10:14 pm:

Well a few years ago I was going to strip paint off some wheels. I have an old copper boiler and a 2 burner camp stove. I bought a box of TSP ??(Trisodium phosphate) and mixed it in the water and heated it up and the used a putty knife and a wire brush and they came ultra clean and very little detail was needed. I then used some fine sand paper to clean up the metal and the spokes. Let them dry few days and painted them black and the job was done. The job was fairly easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, January 13, 2018 - 10:39 pm:

The best sanding thing I found for cleaning/sanding spokes is belt sander belts cut into 1" wide strips for the full length. 18" or whatever length you want. Won't tear or rip apart and keep the spoke round unlike your drums which appear to be distorting them. "Shoe Shine" back & forth motion is best. A Work Mate folding table is great for holding the wheel too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 12:04 am:

You all may laugh at this, but pieces of broken single pane window glass make great scrapers for getting between spokes. When the edges get dull, just grab another piece and get back to work. No sandpaper to clog etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 12:18 am:

The spokes are wood. Wood has grain. Unless needing to remove wood, all sanding should be along the grain. Anything else will leave scratching across the grain. That is OK if you intend to fill and paint as is standard.

Dan, I am not laughing! 1" wide strips of window glass make excellent scrapers, discarding them as the become dull. I would do the job no other way. even the valley between spokes can be scraped by drawing the glass away from the valley so the grain isn't raised. Final sanding is always along the spoke, not around it.

It is upsetting to see wood butchered by the wrong processes, usually in the pursuit time and labour saving.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 01:19 am:

I second Dan's method. A small, very sharp knife will also work as a scraper; re-sharpened the knife on a water stone when dull from scrapening.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 04:37 am:

I don't know if anyone is still doing it, but I had the front wheels on my TT dipped at a furniture restorer. I read all kinds of horror stories about how that would ruin the spokes, but it didn't. All that happened was that I ended up with some very nice clean spokes. That was in the mid '90's. Worked for me. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 04:56 am:

I felt like, as Allan said, that sanding should be done with the grain, or along the length of the spoke rather than across the spoke. I thought about strips of sandpaper drawn back and forth, like some people "polish" a crankshaft, but decided to go with the drum sanding kit instead. I wanted to avoid the mess of using stripper but I admit that what I DON'T know about working with wood could fill a large book, or two. I want to remove the flakeing black paint and remove as little wood as possible. The distortion of the spokes must be an illusion in the pics because I'm sure that very, very little wood was removed on these two spokes. I appreciate any and all advice. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 05:03 am:

Looking closely at the pics I can see why the spokes appear to be distorted. If you look at the ends of the spokes, where they attach to the felloes, they appear to not be round any more. That is one of them optical illusions. I assure you that not enough wood was removed to change the shape as much as it looks like. I am not argueing or saying that I will continue with the sanding as I have, just trying to decide how to continue. Thanks again all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 08:32 am:

Tommy, Please don't take what has been posted here and above as bullying or that you did something wrong. It is good info.

What you used definitely would not have been my first choice. They have the ability to get away from you and do quick damage no mater how careful you are in my opinion.

Yes stripper is messy, no way around that. But it is the least likely to damage good spokes. I used Permetex 80577 (Napa# 765-1085) paint stripper in a spray can. My wheels were painted multiple times so it took repeat applications. I used about a can and a half on each wheel. It needs to be flushed clean with water.

I used a piece of sheet metal that I used a hole saw to cut a hole similar to the diameter of the spoke. I then cut it across the hole, effectively making it a half round scraper. It worked great and you just drag it along the grain of the spoke removing old paint and liquid stripper.

I then used 1" wide strip sand paper to finish the cleaning process, using it much like you describe as polishing a crankshaft---but carefully.

I finished that up by taking sand paper and going with the grain of the spoke to remove the scratches. I needed a smooth wood layer as I was converting to natural wood spokes.

I only had the chance to do the rear wheels last year, hoping to do the fronts by spring time. But hear are mine.




To further what I posted above, if you are just trying to rid the flaking old paint but the rest of it seems sound, you probably don't have to strip the whole wheel if you are repainting everything black. Just get rid of the flaky spots by scraping like Dan said and feather it all out with sand paper. Then you can reprime (sand out any imperfections at that point) and paint. That will keep you from using stripper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 09:17 am:

I am going with natural finish so they have to be clean.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Sherman Tacoma WA on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 01:44 pm:

What finish are you going to use?

Thank you, Paul in Tacoma


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kevin klein on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 03:15 pm:

Another neat trick is using shards of broken glass to scrape off the old paint--cheap, readily available and free! Did this on our Depot Hack in the '70's as my part in the project w/ my Dad. It takes a little practice so that you take the paint an not the wood, but it worked well especially down at the crotch by the hub. I then used strips of emory paper to polish out the surface--shoe shine style 1st, then with grain to finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Monday, January 15, 2018 - 12:15 pm:

Chad -
Do you recall which stain you used on your spokes, name and brand? Your spokes look great and I'd like to duplicate that for a friend's 1926 Coupe. I experimented with various stains on new Stutzman spokes, but I don't like any of them. Your color is perfect.
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, January 15, 2018 - 12:34 pm:

It was Pecan, and I am pretty sure it was Cabot brand, but I can check.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, January 15, 2018 - 02:53 pm:

I don't know what to use on mine. I don't want a stain, that is I don't want to change the color of the wood, I just want some shine. Something to protect the wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, January 15, 2018 - 04:01 pm:

Tommy, I use marine spar varnish, usually 3 coats,lightly sanded between coats. This product is made for harsh marine conditions and has really good ultra violet protection. Just apply it directly to your timber. It does help if the bare timber is first prepared with a coat of Penetrol to seal the grain.

hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Massey on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 08:31 pm:

Interesting post. I used a variety of hand file to remove the old paint from the spokes. Took a couple hours and didn't affect the wood.

Look into a product called Kwik-Poly for your rims.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 09:18 am:

Using plate glass shards for this over the years. Old time painter's tip I got from my dad who worked his way thru college in the depression as a painter's helper.








Then light sand over the scrapped spokes, mask off the wood and spray paint the metal felloe and hub parts. Coated with good spar varnish, first coat thinned, then second coat full. Done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 11:10 am:

Everybody does stuff differently. As far as I'm concerned, Tommy ruined his wheel, but that is his choice. Using the broken piece of glass is an idea that has been around forever. I use an old kitchen knife. The Kwik Poly is for the wood, not the rims!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Kowalczyk - Nampa Idaho on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 12:10 pm:

I did my rear wheels since I was working on the brakes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Kowalczyk - Nampa Idaho on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 12:14 pm:

Here is the products I used, the refinisher only took minutes to clean the wood, and actually took off some of the old paint on the rims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Thompson on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 10:24 am:

Kyle, I looked at the kwik poly. Would this product be good for filling many tack holes in our top bows? Maybe adding sawdust or putting toothpicks in the holes and splits?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Horton, Utah on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 10:59 am:

I restored the top bows for Ole Gert using Kwik Poly and that stuff made a believer out of me. Easy to work with and fills in cracks, tack holes and the repairs I made in the process. As a bonus, as the name says, itís quick!!


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