Radiator coolant.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Radiator coolant.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 04:24 am:

I am almost ready start Henrietta, after some 60 year layoff. I have refitted the radiator. It needed the pressed steel top inlet replaced, following a patch-up with a piece of tin and a liberal coating of tar! The side straps were re-attached at the top and a small weep in one tube soldered up. I have never seen such a clean original as this one. I threatened the repair man that if he painted it he would not be paid.

Because there is no aluminium head, I need not use antifreeze/coolant. I had thought of using some soluble oil to reduce the formation of rust, but need your input as to what ratio of oil to water to use.

The climate here is like southern California, so I have no worries with freezing.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 05:07 am:

Allan, I didn't know about patching a radiator with tar. Please elaborate. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 05:28 am:

Tom,
Original radiator paint was pitch (tar) based, very effective in sealing those very small, or known in the trade, as fury leaks, in no to low pressure radiators. Not something that's used much today as radiators are high pressure and made from aluminium.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 05:45 am:

Allan, 2 to3 table spoons of soluble oil would be enough, to much and the rubber hoses go gooey from the inside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 04:58 pm:

Tommy, the tin patch had developed a leak on one side. That leak was sealed with a liberal coating of tar, applied over some windings of string, presumably to keep it all in place. It was a mess, but appeared to have worked.

Thank's Frank. I was leaning towards considerably more than that!!!! I cut new hoses from black hose stock, as the hoses on the car were black. Four original type clamps were salvaged from the side pipe and re-used. The two top ones were those with a separate lug with tangs which engage in slots in the other piece. I used those to, but had to cut a hole or two off the long piece as the replacement hose was not as thick in the wall.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 14, 2018 - 06:04 pm:

Allen, best on the leaner side of using the oil, it's original intent of using it was to lube the water pump, for that back in the day it was about 3oz added to the cooling system. But other than the hose problem, it was also believed to have reduced heat transfer when soaked into porous cast iron.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lew Morrill on Monday, January 15, 2018 - 11:30 am:

The oil film is an insulator and too much will affect heat transfer both in the engine and in the radiator. A double impact. Why wouldn't you use about 30% antifreeze to protect from corrosion? Almost the same heat transfer as plain water and no damage to the rubber hoses. Best thing is, it will really work to protect that engine and radiator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, January 15, 2018 - 04:16 pm:

Lew, my thoughts were to use soluble oil only as a rust inhibitor in the standard system. I have no need for antifreeze. Corrosion inhibitors found in coolants have a way of finding the furry leaks Frank alluded to in an earlier post. I was trying to avoid these. I guess I will have to suck it and see.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 09:49 pm:

I believe that water soluble oil doesn’t change density with temperature change so it will not circulate like water, so only use a minimal amount. My 24 coupe has used just tap water for the 42 years I have owned it. I did use soluble oil on the 14 because of the aluminum head. It would overheat and I had to install a water pump. Same on the speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 10:20 pm:

Some of the Horseless Carriage guys I know in Minnesota run 100% water during the touring season, but replace it with 50-50 antifreeze for winter storage.

The reason they use only water is because some antique cars don't have 100% leak-proof cooling systems (usually the water pump) and water leaks are preferred over anti-freeze leaks.

My dad has been in the antique car hobby since 1948 and has never put anti-freeze in the antique cars. He always drained them in fall. When he owned a 1927 Hupmobile, he did use water pump lubricant or, as he liked to call it, "lambs milk."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 11:29 pm:

I have always used at least a cup full of water soluble oil in my cars.
Even with antifreeze I add a cup of soluble oil.
I have never noticed hoses rotting on the inside.
The owner of a radiator shop near here said his father that ran the shop before him used straight soluble oil in his own car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Thomas on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 12:27 am:

Red Line "Water Wetter" is a corrosion inhibitor too. I use it in my race cars where anti freeze is prohibited. Its main purpose is to improve cooling, but I use is mainly for corrosion resistance.

In cars where I can, including my "T" I use about 1/4 Prestone which serves the same purpose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 11:43 am:

If you have a brass radiator, be careful. Anti-freeze stains the brass, and is almost impossible to get rid of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 05:09 pm:

Larry, I used to be able to buy a Castrol corrosion inhibitor to mix in the radiator water, before the bean counters at BP took over and continue to delete products from the Castrol range. Now I can only buy coolant containing unnecessary antifreeze.
Do you know if it is the anti freeze, the corrosion inhibitor or both which will etch brass?

Is antifreeze a generic term you fellows use to describe all coolant types?

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Bocchi on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 08:55 pm:

Allan I buy a product at walmart that works as a water wetter and has an anti-corrosion component.It's called Hy-Per Lube Super Coolant. Sells for about $7. Just add to water.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:50 pm:

Evans non-aqueous coolant surprisingly will solve your problems with overheating and boil over and is a permanent antifreeze works well with cast iron and aluminum and other metals. I have used this since 1998 with no problems


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:52 pm:

I thought waterless coolant didn't work in a thermo-siphon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 07:09 am:

Tim I've had no problems other than some seepage at the hoses which was corrected


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 07:36 am:

Bob, I have also used Evans coolant for years in my 1911. The boiling point is high and you don't have to use antifreeze. I had a little trouble with leaking at the hoses also. The Evans company told me to use Aviation Form-A-gasket to seal the hoses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 05:28 pm:

Peter, I use aviation form a gasket too. Using the soluble oil was an attempt to alleviate the little niggling leaks coolant will induce.

Update on Henrietta's radiator installation. The original hose clamps have been removed and put aside. With the thinner walled hoses available today, they tended to pull a roll of hose up between the lugs, making a really nice leak at three of four clamps. By the time I got a bucket under the car and loosened the clamps to drain the fluid, I'd lost quite a bit.

I scrounged up four well used/partly rusted worm drive clamps, cut those to length, and used them. Totally incorrect for the era of the car, but also totally workable. With a little more age on them they will assume later period repair status!

I topped up the remaining fluid with rainwater, so my soluble oil will be further diluted.

Allan from down under.


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