New to model T-- or any old vehicle for that matter

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: New to model T-- or any old vehicle for that matter
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Arey on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 12:41 pm:

Happy to be a part of this forum and hoping to learn a lot. I have been combing through threads telling myself that Iíd only post if the deal went through for a model t I was looking at. It belonged to my best friend from childhood whoís mom inherited from her father that bought it in the late 1940s. I'm very fortunate to have a connection like this and got it for what i did. Iím an engineer by trade and mechanically inclined but this is the first car Iíll ever have worked on. I grew up watching it run and be driven through the neighborhood with a skeleton in the passengers seat. Any information you can provide would be great. Iíve made a great friend thats well versed in the model T and when it warms up weíre going to comb through it before starting it up. Thanks

!Loaded
Me with car


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Arey on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 12:43 pm:

engine
headlights


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 12:59 pm:

Welcome to the affliction! Great looking car. Looks like someone put a water pump on it that may be hiding a problem with the cooling system. looks like it is saying get me off this trailer and take me around the block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:00 pm:

Thank you for showing us your car and telling us about it. I hope you will enjoy owning it. It is great fun for so many of us.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:04 pm:

Kyle your a lucky guy! Nice car you have and just by the pics it probably isn't much wrong with it. Probably wouldn't hurt to drain all the fluids and add fresh oil and water with antifreeze of course.
Sounds likes your friend is knowledgable about T's and that's a plus. There are knowledgeable people here that also be of help. On this forum you will see different points of view for repairs, transmission bands, type of oil and you name it. That's just part of it. Different strokes for different folks I guess.
Buy the Model T service manual and any other instruction manuals and STUDY them.
My advice would be to drive and treat your T as if it had NO brakes. Once you figure this out its a blast owning and driving a car with 100 year old technology. T's have brakes and will stop but not like a modern car or truck. You'll figure that out!
Have fun and be safe !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:06 pm:

Great looking car and welcome to a great hobby that you and your family can enjoy for a lifetime. Have fun. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:14 pm:

Kyle,
Welcome! That looks like a great car. Touring are nice because you can share the joy with others.

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nunn on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:18 pm:

I hope you didnít go far with the front axle strapped down like that. Hopefully, nothing bent. I find myself in a similar situation Kyle. (I, too, am an engineer, but thatís not what Iím talking about.) I am nearing the acquisition of a í27 Runabout that my uncles restored decades ago. I am buying it from my aunt and she bought it from a cousin before the restoration. I will merely be the next family member to own it and have already made it clear that I will bequeath it to my auntís grandson upon my passingÖ many decades in the future.

I am in the process of beefing up the tie-down locations of an enclosed trailer before making the 800-mile journey to bring her home. She will share space with my other old car, a Thunderbird that Iíve had over 30 years. I have watched the T run in parades for many years and Iím looking forward to tinkering, but mostly driving. I will add photos to my profile after I get it home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:19 pm:

Welcome and forget 90% of what you know about aerospace engineering. LOL Thats a beautiful can and should bring much joy. I inherited one also and suggest you write down tales/history of the car as you remember them or as people tell you. Take lots of photos to document where you are starting and how the hell it goes back together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:26 pm:

Just so you know this is how I tie down my front end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:32 pm:

One of the things to wonder about is why the water pump was added. You can just see the pully in the engine photo.

There is a lot of discussion on the forum about that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:35 pm:

Welcome to the group ... and what a wonderful first T to own. You are very lucky.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Arey on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:35 pm:

Mark and GR--- The trip was about 20 miles so hopefully nothing was bent. Hoping that any vibration on the trailer wouldve relieved the front axle and distributed more on the rear unless I did that wrong too lol Never went more than 50 mph and boy was that stressful


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:42 pm:

Beautiful T to begin your descent into T madness. Enjoy and be sure to post pictures


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 01:43 pm:

A lack of experience working on cars may be an advantage. You won't have to unlearn what doesn't apply to the very different Model T. :-)

My dad grew up in horse & buggy times and had the mechanical touch of death, so I was raised with no experience. I'm happy to report that it ain't rocket surgery. There's lots of help and info available.

I'll second the idea of taking pictures when you take anything apart, because you will forget. Also put fasteners from any particular application in a baggie and label them.

You're ahead of the game having somebody with experience handy. Here's a little homework to get you started:

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG79.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 05:33 pm:

Since the previous owner bought the car in 1940's you could be only the 3rd owner. The title will tell you a story about the car whether it has the original engine in it going by the engine no. It looks to be a 1916. Just think, a car that doesn't have anything to do with computers. Now that's something to think about for this generation
As others have correctly stated read up all you can about your T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 06:00 pm:

Kyle, that is a wonderful start to the Model T hobby. It looks a good driver, so get out and enjoy as you learn.

There is not a lot wrong with your tie-down technique. With the car loaded backwards as you have it, the only real strain on the front axle would be if you got involved in a crash stop. It would be better if you put your straps outboard of the spring perches so the load is more on the wheels rather than the centre of the axle. I would never tie a T down by the frame. It does take the strain off the axle but it means any tension on the straps is attempting to compress the suspension. On undulating roads, the straps will be alternating between tight and loose as the car suspension does its thing.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 10:13 pm:

At the age of 16, I purchased my 1926 Model T Coupe in 1970 for $600.00. Back then, there was no Forum to ask questions of or internet to research, so I was on my own. It took me 2 years, but I got 'er done with the help of the below 3 books. I suggest you purchase them and become very familiar with them. They will tell you just about all you need to know about maintaining and repairing your Model T. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 12:10 am:

Great looking car. Welcome to the forum.


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