Economy engine rinse?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Economy engine rinse?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 11:41 pm:

Some sources recommend kerosene to rinse out the engine and transmission. But that stuff that has become pretty expensive. Is there something less costly that works as well? Diesel maybe?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 11:46 pm:

Diesel or kerosene you would still have to get it out of the dipper tray. I would think you would only need about a gallon and at 12-14 still isn't too bad. Let it settle and burn in your tiki-torch, keep the sketers away. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 06:37 am:

Yeah, I'd think diesel would be just as good. It's hard to find, but if you can find a station with a bulk kerosene pump, the price ain't so bad. Maybe double the price of gas. Nowhere near as high as buying it in a can at Lowe's or Home depot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Thompson Graham NC on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 07:23 am:

I think mineral spirits sure is nice and clean to work with. Philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:12 am:

Mineral spirits. I rinse all mine out with it. Described the process I used on a similar thread late last year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:17 am:

In rural Maine you can find stations with pumps for farm diesel, about 30 cents per gallon cheaper because they don't charge highway taxes. The stuff is dyed red, so pretty easy for the DOT inspectors to detect; if caught with dyed fuel in a highway vehicle they'll throw the book at you. Also, in Maine, home heating oil (delivered to a tank in a residence) isn't even subject to sales taxes so is cheaper yet...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:19 am:

Can someone please educate me, why would there be a need to rinse the engine and transmission if you use a modern detergent oil and perform regular oil changes? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Thompson Graham NC on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 09:24 am:

Try it and see what comes out. I was amazed.
I Jack the front up to drain the pan dips
When I'm done. Philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 10:15 am:

I need kerosene in considerable quantities for my Stanley steam car. NJ has no bulk kerosene pumps anywhere near me, and when you can find it, it's of dubious quality. But there is a friendly airport not far away that lets me fill 5-gallon cans with Jet-A, which is highly refined kerosene. If it works at 35,000 feet, it's probably good enough for my little rubber-tired choo-choo. It's about $6.50 a gallon. Maybe if you go to an airport big enough for private jets and turboprops but not big enough for TSA security lines, you can get some.

P.S. Despite rumors to the contrary, my steamer running on jet fuel can't fly like Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang, nor can it cruise at over 100 mph.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 10:17 am:

I used half diesel and half mineral spirits. I guess I'm cheap since the diesel is cheap and the mineral spirits is over twice as high a gallon as the diesel is.
The mix still cuts pretty good. As Phillip says you will be surprised how dark the rinse gets after filling the crankcase and cranking the engine a few times and Let it sit up a while.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 10:33 am:

I used a gallon of Kerosene in my spare engine last fall. When we opened the oil drain plug, a thick tar like substance very slowly came out. Poured in the kerosene in, cranked it for a bit (no starter), let it sit, and cranked it again. The kerosene came out black, and the engine turned over easier. I should do it again this spring, or just change oil this winter, and let it sit til spring, while turning it over periodically.

I have thought about doing it to my driver.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 02:33 pm:

Only thing I don't like about the "rinsing-out" process is the fact that when you're all done "rinsing", you have to do something about the kerosene that's left ing the four troughs in the "dipper try" as Mark Strange mentions. Otherwise, you end up diluting the fresh oil you put in the engine with a considerable quantity of kerosene.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 03:40 pm:

Jack the vehicle up and you empty the dipper troughs. Run used oil through by hand cranking to dissipate any mineral spirits left (though most evaporate on their own). Jack again to clear dipper troughs. Fill with new oil.

Why rinse? Most of what I haul home hasnít run in 40+ years and whatever sludge is in the crankcase needs to be flushed out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 03:55 pm:

Covered - in detail - a month ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 03:55 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/708324/816499.html?1513272383


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 05:35 pm:

Steve... See my old thread that Ron posted above. But as I emphasized in the thread, the most important thing you can do is pull the pan retaining ring out and clean all the gunk and sludge behind it. Then, spray WD-40 on everything in there and wipe it down with a clean rag. You can use Kerosene or mineral spirits on a soaked rag too. But get the sludge out. If you don't do that, it's no different than changing your oil without changing the filter on a modern car. Good luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 06:19 pm:

I just wiped out my car's engine, and James' suggestion about cleaning the pan retaining ring is excellent. Lots-o-glop. Now if I can get the cover to reseal... Will start a separate thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 06:23 pm:

My engine is fresh, with less than 50 miles since rebuild. I have already changed the oil twice. The second time because I had quite a bit of condensation inside the engine, probably because of my driving, or not driving, habits. I have changed my oil and my habits. My engine will continue to get regular, although less frequent, oil changes as long as I own it. The oil screen and magnet will be cleaned between oil changes. Therefore I don't think my engine will need flushing with anything except the oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 06:46 am:

I haven't checked it out, but it seems to me to empty the troughs in the pan dips, you would have to lift the front of the car a LOT for them to drain all of the oil/sludge out. Seems to me, it would be much easier and more positive to just drop the inspection cover to be sure to get everything out after "rinsing" with anything. Using detergent oil to begin with would negate most of those problems of sludge, but dropping the inspection cover once in a while would be good too. JMHO Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 08:31 am:

High detergent oil will do an amazing job of "cleaning" an engine, at least one with an oil pump, if used correctly. A few years ago a friend bought a junkyard 455 Pontiac that we put into a '54 Pontiac wagon. When we removed the valve covers there was a lot of sludge. He opened the drain back holes and put the valve covers back on. Someone recommended that he use Valvoline oil. I can't remember what weight he used. We filled it and he drove it about 100 miles and let it set still and run in between drives. Then, with more Valvoline and a fresh filter and another 100 miles +/- we removed the valve covers again and could hardly believe how clean everything was inside. He put a bunch of trouble free miles on the car before selling or trading it. I had always worried about washing junk down into the oil pan of an engine done that way but the 455 had great oil pressure as long as he kept the car and ran great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 12:14 pm:

Even with the car lifted at the front there will still be oil in the dippers and behind the inspection retaining ring. I have jacked mine up as high as the floor jack would go and there was still oil in the inspection plate after allowing to drain over night. Add a qt of oil thru the filler and allow it to wash more of the old oil or what you have used to clean the engine out before replacing the drain plug and dropping back down. I have thought about adding drain plugs in each dipper to allow for draining while the car sits flat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 12:46 pm:

Maybe I'm just lucky but I've had virtually all my engines "opened up"just to be nosey at least once or twice in the last 5 years and frankly they're clean as a whistle. Maybe 'cause I use the "high priced spread" as opposed to "no name" oil? I've always heard and agree you can't beat good ol' Rotella and frankly it aint much more $ than the store brands. And of course change it pretty regularly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 02:03 pm:

I was not concerned about a bit of kerosene left in the dipper tray after jacking up the front of the T.

The first time the motor gets warm it vaporizes.

Also think that diesel is a good alternative.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 03:11 pm:

I don't think the price of oil says how clean the inside is, it's how often you change it and mechanical condition of same.
Ya but dumping the qt of 2.89 oil in the front makes me happy! :-)


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration