A-C rear brakes and brake rod kits

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: A-C rear brakes and brake rod kits
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john pawlowski - NE Pennsylvania on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 01:20 pm:

Hello all,
I'm looking for the contact information for the A-C rear brake and brake rod kits. From what I've seen there are two people who reproduce,one does the brake shoe part and the brake rod and hardware is done by someone else. Does anyone know if installation instructions are included? This will be my 2018 spring/summer Model T project. In addition to inspecting and installing missing cotter pins and proper hardware and inspecting front and rear hubs. Already know that I have a leaking left rear oil seal. Fingers crossed I'm not opening Pandoras box.
Thanks in advance
Green John from NE Pennsylvania


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 03:07 pm:

John google "mtfca; ac brakes" sit back and read up and enjoy. There has been a lot if info posted over the past few years. I am suggesting googling because there has been so much info posted not because we do not want to help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Ramsey, Bruceton Mills, WV on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 07:11 am:

Hello John,
As Mark noted, if you google using the key words he mentioned you will find much. The contacts are:
Larry Sidmore makes the brakes and his number is 209-533-9207. Rich Baughman makes the linkage rod system and his number is 916-652-7827. Here is the link to some info posted before:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/599638/623576.html

If you scroll through this post you will find some detailed "tips" on installation that I posted that includes some pictures. My post is March 19 at 09:33 am.

Hope this helps John.
Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 07:36 am:

The original style repop AC brakes I bought had cables instead of rods. I eventually fabricated rods for them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 08:23 am:

Thank you Bill Ramsey! I have a set of ACs ordered and will follow your suggestions. I hear that getting all of this adjusted so everything works together is tricky. Can anyone provide guidance?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john pawlowski - NE Pennsylvania on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 09:39 am:

Bill Ramsey thanks,that was what I was mainly looking for, contact information. Just to be able to get the brakes and linkage ordered. I have no doubt that the posts will guide me through the horrors of the installations and any other issues the guys in the club will get me the rest of the way. Hopefully this will be a great year for me and my Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 11:12 am:

AC brakes used a cable instead of rods. I can't understand why anyone would want to change that function. Same thing with Rocky Mountains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 11:45 am:

With rods, adjustment stays put.

Cables can stretch so some type of spring tension is needed, or in this install of small drum 'AC -type' external brakes, the owner put in a cable tensioner.








'Floating' equalizer bracket allows the external brakes to be applied when pulling back the clutch/emergency brake lever for double braking, a good idea IMO, the modern Rocky Mtn. brakes use this method.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john pawlowski - NE Pennsylvania on Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 12:49 pm:

Hello all, it's my understanding that the Rich Baughman linkage kit uses rods and not cables.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 10:09 am:

McMaster Carr has 3/16" cable that won't stretch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 04:53 am:

Cable clamps should never have the "u" part of the clamp on the main cable. The "saddle" should be there with the "u" part on the "tail". Reason being, the "u" will be more likely to "cut" or wear through the cable than (not THEN) the saddle. The "tail" only has to hold half of the strain on the cable. Probably trivial in this case, but, that's the way it should be done. Not JMHO, but fact. :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 05:41 am:

David: "Never saddle a dead horse"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 07:40 am:

David and Dan are correct: Never saddle a dead horse. Meaning; the end of the cable is named the dead end, do not use the saddle on the dead end. Easy to remember and anyone who has worked with cable and cable clamps is sure to know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 10:02 am:

I'm so confused... Which of the clamps show above is done correctly?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 10:58 am:

In the second photo, the first clamp, nearest the clevis(shackle), in on correctly. The farthest clamp, up the cable, is on backwards.

For this application, this in not a serious problem due to light loads on the cable and the lack of any bending of the cable around/over something.

One of the worst things about cable; it rusts both INSIDE and outside. Usually, the inside will rust worse since it retains the moisture more than the outside. Sudden catastrophic failure can occur. When inspecting cables, it is necessary to open them up to see what is going on inside as well as on the outside.

Remember; cables are a working machine and need periodic lubrication the same as your spring shackles or spindle bushings.

Good Luck,
Terry


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