Old photo - German photo from the 60s

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old photo - German photo from the 60s
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joerg Walther - FarFarAway (Germany) on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 07:42 am:

Found this - obviously some advertising of Ford Germany showing a Model T and a 'Taunus' car.
Ford started to put Model T's together from imported parts in Berlin since 1925 (with sets coming from Amsterdam / Netherlands and Copenhagen / Denmark).
Due to high duties for foreign products the model T in germany was not a bargain as in the U.S.A., so Ford decided to start a complete production in Germany. In 1929 they started from Zero on the green field in Cologne on the river Rhine to build a new plant (which still is producing the German Fords today). 1930 Henry and Clara Ford visited Cologne and met the mayor Mr Adenauer (who became Chancelor of Germany after WW2).
The picture must be from the 60's and behind the T there is a Ford Taunus. These cars are named after a german line of hills in the middle of the country. Due to it's shape the car was called 'Badewanne' (bath tub) and normally had a 1.7 litre V4 engine. I myself have been brought to school a few times in such a car end of the 60's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 08:57 am:

Very interesting Joerg. Thanks for posting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 09:05 am:

I had a '74 Taunus when I was stationed in West Germany in the mid 80's. Drove that thing all over the country. Got it up to 160 kph once. I thought the pistons were gonna swap cylinders. It was good car. Got to see a lot of beautiful places driving that thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Horton, Utah on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 09:07 am:

Spent a year or so at Birkenfeld Air Station, near Idar-Oberstein,
in 1967/68. You are right, FarFarAway in both distance and TIME.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Curtis Fesler on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 09:37 am:

Stationed in Fulda, W. Germany in early 60s and loved the Taunus. The T in the picture looks like mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dominic Denio in TN on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 09:51 am:

Gentleman,

Thank you for your service.

Dom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 11:06 am:

When I was at Little Rock AFB in the sixties, there was a captain who had brought a Taunus back from Germany. He drove it for a number of years, as I recall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 04:56 pm:

Interesting Joerg - thank you.

I did not realise that the Taunus was named after the Taunus mountain range! I had never twigged - but should've.

Interestingly, Ford-US was right behind Ford of Germany developing the Taunus in the early 60's (I know the marque was earlier than that). Front wheel drive, a V-4 engine - all revolutionary stuff. Ford-US wanted this to be a Cologne-Dagenham joint project, which was code named the Cardinal project.

But Ford of Britain wouldn't play ball. They designed their own car instead, under the code name Archbishop!!! And the other aspect of this story is what I've just twigged: when they released this new car, Ford of Britain reminded Ford of Germany (and Ford-US) that they were completely independent, by choosing another mountainous area for their new car's name. Cortina!

John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 09:13 pm:

Bump


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 02:37 am:

Starting 1974 SAAB uased the German Ford V4 in their cars.
I worked on a few.
When I was in Germany the U.S. Army had quite a few Ford Taurus cars to use for longer trips than most would care to drive a Jeep.
Tall guys had to put the steering column shift lever in neutral to get enough knee room to hit the brake pedal..
Some had the Saxomat automatic clutch.
In those days they were a flathead 4.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Danmark on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:38 pm:

Cortina d'ampezo is a very well known ski resort and city in northern italy - home of the winter olympics in 1956.
The Cortina and Taunus lines eventually merged in 1976 (Cortina mk. IV / Taunus TC2)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 11:39 am:

Before the Ford Taunus, there the Ford Eifel, also named after some mountains, which I thought was good looking little car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joerg Walther - FarFarAway (Germany) on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 01:18 pm:

Yep - and later they headed more south with cars like 'Capri' (Italy) and 'Granada' (Spain) but too soon changed to artificial name creations like 'Mondeo' (the world model).

I had a 2 Litre Scorpio of 1992 for many years. The biggest Ford to get in Europe with much room inside and American style.



I loved it until rust and age parted us and changed to a Jaguar S-Type in 2003.
That was the time of Ford ownership and that model did share the chassis with the Lincoln LS.




Lucky enough I could then get another S-Type in 2008 owned by Jaguar Germany as a show car and having only 2500 kms on the speedo at an age of 18 months. This one I do still own and with it's V8 and supercharged 400 hp it is the real contrast to my 1916 T (with a speed difference of 200 kph possible and enjoyed from time to time).




Pictures shown are from the net and not my cars - just was too lazy to resize)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 05:17 am:

Aaron - I did not know that Ford fitted the Saxomat clutches to their cars! We live and learn.

Michael Deichmann - the common Cortina/Taunus 'Ford of Europe' platform began a tad earlier, with the Mk3 Cortina. An important step in the Ford history, as they were reverting to global cars.
And Joerg is quite right about Mondeo - the name is taken from the Latin mondo, meaning 'world'. A new 'Universal Car'! And Focus was designed to do the same. The US-built Taurus was supposed to take that global lead, but it flopped.

Rust, Joerg? That really is disappointing - and I had similar troubles with a late model Ford too. Very disappointing, especially when you know Ford's competitors are not afflicted with such basic troubles. And disappointing too when a car such as the Sierra - well, the Sierra Cosworth - was more or less a go cart with a body - their performance is sensational. I know a few reached the 'States - I saw one in Hawaii once - but they should not rust. But they did. As did my Australian Falcon.

John Stokes
New Zealand


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