Old photo colorized Henry 1919

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old photo colorized Henry 1919
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 01:07 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 03:47 pm:

Why?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 04:01 pm:

Aw,heck...........why not?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 04:21 pm:

Those colors are all wrong...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 05:55 pm:

Colors seem fine to me, this portrait hangs in Richmond Hill, the southern plantation that Clara and Henry built in 1925. The site was a southern plantation that was burned to the ground at the last of Sherman's March.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 11:22 pm:

I never knew he was such a colorful guy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 11:34 pm:

Read the date on the photo, if you have to ask why, because it was done in 1919 that's why. I think it might have been taken during the tractor testing. Maybe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 11:43 pm:

Henry at his best, sitting on a fence row, in the grass/weeds, his feet in the furrow at the edge of a field and he's happy.
Has it been sprinkling just a bit? Look.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:16 am:

Why......Humm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:18 am:

Ahhh this is why.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:35 am:

I like the colorized photo.

Bill Nye looks like a natural to play Henry!

He'd have to train his voice a bit to match Henry's.

That Harvey Firestone sure was a talker! I thought he'd never shut up and let Henry speak. :-)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q32d6RdDfoQ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:35 am:

Cool! Thanks Neil. I like the colorized version, wrong or not. I've just always loved that particular pose. Raises many questions..like, what's he thinking? What's he looking at? Maybe thinking of his upcoming 56th. birthday party? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:01 am:

Colorized old photos or old movies have always looked close to being natural but still 'not quite' to me. Archival footage of WW1 have that same look to it to me.
You can always spot a colorized old photo or film by that same 'tinge' they have. MHO of course.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:11 am:

The main problem with colourized WWI footage is that there is no variation in the colours! A group of soldiers marching to battle will all have the exact tint to their uniforms with no variations for wear, fading or dirt.
I guess they program in "All French soldiers- blue" and the computer slathers them all in the same tint.
I do like the advances in film restoration that makes ancient films from the Great War as crisp and clean as if they were shot last week, even at a slightly faster speed than we accept as normal today....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:28 am:

It amazes me that men in those days would wear a suit when sitting on the grass or even working on a car. To me a suit is used for special occasions only.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 02:41 pm:

Norman I agree...except only for when I'm laying in the casket. Otherwise, it's blue jeans & a T shirt for me, or sweatshirt if it's colder weather! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 03:00 pm:

I think he can afford to replace the suit and is probably more interested in the demonstration or watching people than a mud spot on his trousers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 04:11 pm:

There are a lot of stories about Henry that reflect upon his personal life. One that I retell is that his personal manservant would put a 100 bill is his suit pocket each morning in the chance Ford needed to buy something. After he died, the family help found 100 dollar bills stuck everywhich way. He used them as book markers, put them in desk drawers or left them in the pockets of seldom used clothing. After he became wealthy he had no use for personal cash .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 04:33 pm:

Dale, the reason those old films look faster is the difference between silent and sound. When sound was added a constant projection speed was needed. That was established at 24 frames per second. Silent film speeds varied, but were usually slower than 24 fps. The most common was 16 fps. When films shot at slower speeds are shown at 24 fps, the action is speeded up. If a silent film is shown at the same speed it was shot, as it would have been in theaters during the silent era, the action is normal.

Norm's comment about men wearing suits calls to mind the Dick and Jane books we had in first and second grade. I thought it was really weird that Father would go on a picnic wearing a suit. When he painted the screens he wore a tie and a sweater. Those books came from upper class folks back east.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 05:36 pm:

Mark, thanks for that clip of Ford, Firestone and Edison. That's the first time I've ever heard Ford's voice! Are there any other period recordings or films of Henry speaking?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 05:39 pm:

I didn't see any in my quick Google search, but considering Henry's long life there must be more. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 06:22 pm:

Thanks for posting that video Mark.

I find it interesting that Thomas Edison was saying how there's such a demand for workers, and endless opportunity on October 21, 1929.

Three days later would begin the stock market crash that kicked off the Great Depression.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 09:11 pm:

Fantastic clip! Thanks Mark!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 09:34 pm:

Thumbs up for the colorized photo. As to HF speaking in public I don't think there's much. Believe he got tired of pulling his foot out of his mouth early on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 07:04 pm:

Henry was a charmer in small groups (3 - 4 people) and could get anybody to do just about anything for him. Also, he was a heck of a prankster. BUT he could be notoriously shy with crowds and hated public speaking. So, there really are not many films or recordings of him and the ones that do exist, are very short because his comments were short.


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