Pickers on tonight

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Pickers on tonight
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 05:41 pm:

I guess I'm showing my ignorance here as I don't even know what the program is titled. "American Pickers"? Just "Pickers"? Beats me, but you folks that watch TV will know.
Anyway, I just got a call from a friend informing me that the show tonight will be at Anderson, Indiana at Vanessa Robinson's place. She took over her fathers business a few years back when he died. Actually, she was pretty much running it before. She sells a lot of T & A parts.
I just thought those of you that watch television might want to know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 05:56 pm:

Hi Fred, it is usually titled American Pickers.

Will have to look for that tonight :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 05:58 pm:

Thanks Fred, I see where sheíll be on 8:00 pm CST. Thatíll be channel 120 on DISH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Frost on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 06:07 pm:

Have any contact info for their business? Thanks, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard H.Miller on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 06:48 pm:

Yes it will be on tonight at 9:00 pm est on history channel 120 dish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 08:15 pm:

For the "west coasters" that have Direct TV, it'll be on channel 269 at 6:00pm and 10:00pm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:15 pm:

They just said As were made from 27 to 31. I always thought Ts were made in 27. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:34 pm:

I watched and enjoyed it!Thank's for the heads up! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robbie Price on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:01 pm:

I liked Savannah's A400!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Danmark on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:08 pm:

Ford Model A was introduced 2. half of 1927 as the year 28 model A. Standard Ford practice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:45 pm:

Awww they didn't have any Ts :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 12:43 am:

I know a guy in Coventry R.I.that has a 1927 model a 2 door.looks like any model a,except there are no brakes on the front end,and the steering wheel is red.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F Stephens-Marcle , N.C. Triangle on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 12:54 am:

will be on again tonight at 1 am EST


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By wayne tomlins on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 01:58 am:

Model A production only started in Dec. '27, Henry was definitely behind the ball getting it out, probably by a year. Also, all Model A's had front brakes ; Richard may mean that the car he saw had no separate emergency brake system which was changed by Aug. '28. Some of the very first chassis had no provision for the new Houdille shock absorbers which was soon amended. 1932 was also a production/selling year for Model A, but finishing off for April intro. of the Model B/18.
We get The Pickers on TV here also ; they certainly put a good mark up on their bargain purchases. Cheers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 02:23 am:

I knew T production ended in the summer of 27. I also knew that A production was delayed until way after the normal introductory date around Sept. or Oct., but I had no idea Model A production didn't begin until Dec. 27. It makes sense though. The first Model A delivered by a Houston, TX dealer was a 28 tudor sedan delivered by Bonner Motor Company on Jan. 26, 1928. The Ford dealer in my small hometown, west of Houston, didn't have an Model A's until early 1928, but had plenty of Model T's that no one wanted because they were waiting for the Model A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 06:36 am:

I wonder when it will appear in Belgium??

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Curtis Fesler on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 07:38 am:

I watched the first half of the show and loved it. The second half featuring a hoarder who didn't want to sell anything was a waste of time as are many of the shows. I can't understand how anyone can stockpile a building full of junk and fall in love with it to the point they do not want to make a a sale and make a buck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 08:12 am:

I loved the look on Frankís face when Savannah said she wanted $45,000 for the A400. I couldnít stop laughing!
You could tell Frank wasnít happy paying $625 for the Texaco sign. But, he stole that Socony oil can for $85.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 09:20 am:

Curtis ... I feel the same way about hoarders. Have known many over the years. My feelings about most old ďstuffĒ is that I enjoy them as a learning tool. Once I have stopped using a piece and feel like I got what I needed from it ... I can let it go. Even more now that Iím getting older. When I meet someone who will really enjoy something Iím not using any more, particularly if they are younger, I make it come their way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 10:15 am:

Dave Frost ------- 765/640-1931 - 768W-600N, Alexandria, IN
Where did the Savannah come from? Did they call her that on the show? I've always know her as Vanessa Johnson. Actually, I've only seen her a few times. Warren Miller and I went out to her place once and I would see her at the swap meet in Indy once a year. As for the A400, it was one rare car. $45000? I have no idea, but I do know some folks think their cars are worth more than other folks do. Case in point: Warren Miller had a '14 Runabout. He told me he wouldn't take $25k for it. He told his wife it was worth $40k. It sold at his auction form ~$16k+. It was in perfect condition. Quite a deal I think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 10:23 am:

Seems as soon as they uncovered the
'Rolls" the forgot about the Frontenac headed Model T speedster that they called a Model A, What were the wheels on the speedster ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 10:55 am:

Fred - Savannah is Vanessa's daughter. She was featured prominently on the episode with her mother, Vanessa.

I don't think Frank grasped how rare A400s actually are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 11:04 am:

Andre, is there a good Dutch equivalent to "picker"? The closest that Van Dale gives is "iemand die spullen uitzoekt/sorteert," but that wouldn't be a very catchy name for a TV show! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 12:13 pm:

Ron - Thanks, now I understand

Here's the obit of the guy that put it all together.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/name/William-Johnson-obituary?pid=149761585&vie w=guestbook


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 12:14 pm:

Ive probably mentioned this before. A general Picker rule of thumb is to "try and double your money on items you buy" The key word here is "try" I have been a picker most of my life (we call it "junker" here in Arkansas) I started when I was 11 years old. :-) I can tell you from a "picker/junker point of view that it is very hard to do. You do good on some items and "lose your ass" on others. George mentioned the Rolls above. On that same episode Robbie was trying to sell the Packard Roadster that had been used as a wrecker. They bought it in Missouri well over a year ago for 20,000 dollars. After a lot of failed attempts to sell it, they finally let it go for 20,000. But they had over 22,000 in it because they had it worked on to get it running, they had bought a full set of new tires, and had shipping from Missouri to Iowa to add to the price. So on that car they lost over 2000.00 and all their time and labor. That is just one of the many times they have "lost their ass" But to stay in business they need the "good" deals to average out the "bad" deals. The second half of this show is the first "new" show that they filmed as part of the Okla/Ark picking they did that I was considered for. I have been to his place before. (probably over ten to fifteen years ago) He lives not far from Yale Okla where all my grandparents and other family has been since 1916. I cut my "picking teeth" in that area... He is a real nice man and is not ready to sell yet. (his daughter and wife made the Picker call) Im curious to see the rest of the 8 shows filmed in Okla/Ark to see if the Pickers actually got much stuff from the guys that "beat me out" of being on the show. Robbie and the "pre-crew" came to my place last November to do the "interview" and make sure I actually was a real person. They were supposed to have 40 "prospects" to chose 8 shows from. I do not have as much as he does, so they chose quantity over my willingness to sell. I could have filled their truck and still not missed the items they bought. Im at the "time to let things go". The other guy is "not there yet"

have fun and be safe ......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 09:58 pm:

Just watched the episode and I must say, the best part of the whole show was seeing Savannah - Love those boots! Even my 18 year old son was easily convinced to watch the first half of the program!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 06:42 am:

Bill - you are spot on; Savannah was a doll with a great personality. Best part of the episode.

They paid a lot for that AA wrecker - about 2K too much. Lot of issues with it for 8K. Thatís probably going to bite them later - like the Packard bit them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darryl Bobzin on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 07:43 am:

With the money they make per show, I don't think they have to make a dime off of what they buy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 08:46 am:

Iíve been a picker (antiques buyer and also banjo player) since before I could drive a car. I would get rides to the fantastic flea markets in our area. Originally my interest was antique phonographs. I had over 30 Edison and other machines by the time I went to college. I learned 1920s songs from the old records and eventually got a job playing banjo and singing on a local tourist steam train. That was my summer job for several years ... much easier than bailing hay which is what I did prior to that.

I bought my first model T (a chassis with radiator, engine, firewall, steering assembly, rear assembly and tractor seat) from an old man named Joe Roaches. He had mountains of auto and steam boiler related junk in and around an 1850s one room school house in Newtown, Penna. Joe was not well educated and drank a lot .. but had been a professional steam fitter and knew how things worked. He was real influence in my life. Every so often he would call me and ask me to come over to buy something and bring $30 and a can of mushrooms. I never knew what he wanted to sell me and I usually I didnít need it. A brass era head light one time, then a primitive blacksmith tool and an NOS turtle deck the next. He had even assembled an entire 1910 Model T in the basement ... which had to be disassembled when he eventually went into a nursing home. He got me started with buying and selling things.

At the very least ... I always doubled my money when selling. The trick was to buy very cheap so that I could still sell cheap ... everyone is satisfied. I bought a lot of phonographs with broken springs or missing parts for around $20 and selling them the next week for $150-250.

By the time I went to college in Kansas City, MO I was buying antiques at farm auctions in Penna Dutch country and selling them wholesale when I went back to school for extra money. I still do it with anything I can find cheap enough if Iím familiar with the object and the market.

My absolute best pick was an antique photographic enlargement of two boys meeting on on a country road; one with books and the other with a fishing rod. I bought it for $8 when I was fifteen. Fast forward in my fifties and I see a reproduction of the same photograph in a 1918 photo magazine at work (George Eastman Museum) and discover it was taken and printed by Edward Weston. I sold that print for $1400 at auction in NYC. It paid for a new roof on our house ... and a lobster dinner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 08:48 am:

It is funny to watch them continually buy old roached out cars and then turn around and sell them for less than what they paid. For all the times they have been burned, you'd think they'd shy away from cars! Who in there right mind would pay above 16K for a total loss old Rolls Royce??? It's not like buying a similar year Ford or even Chevy, where parts are readily available for restoration or even (heaven forgive me) rat-rodding but who the heck is going to rat-rod an old Rolls??? And any serious Royce buyer isn't going to sniff at that car when he can put down a bit more for a more solid one.


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