Parking Brake liners

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Parking Brake liners
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:08 pm:

We installed new brake bands and liners . Now the brake drum wont , slide over the liner! Any sugestons?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 09:33 pm:

What year car? If it's your 26, you may need to remove some thickness from the lining. Or the cam is not relaxed all the way or the brake shoes are not in the clips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:08 pm:

It is a 26, the catalog talked like the cam area. Do I need to take the 4 inch grinder to the Cam and Band serfaces. Has anybody had this problem?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:49 pm:

Maybe if everything else is good, the lining you installed may just be too thick and needs to be reduced some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Monday, January 29, 2018 - 10:53 pm:

I've recently had bonded linings attached to my 1926 brake shoes because I was unhappy with the performance of the repro linings.
The correct thickness is 5/32".
The drums fitted on straight away and only minor adjustment was required to the brake rods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 04:46 am:

A while back I replaced my rear brake linings on my '26 with some different material I ordered from McMaster-Carr. It was definitely thicker than the lining material sold by the vendors. So I just took the belt sander to it and judiciously removed just enough material to get the shoes to fit in the brake drum. Has been working well ever since.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 06:49 am:

Thanks guys! LOOKS like I'm going to be using the belt sander,and the grinder


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 07:15 am:

Do it outside and wear a mask.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 09:33 am:

Have you had a close look at why the drum won't go on?

In my case I could just never get the shoes lined up just right concentric to the shaft. What I did was run two rows of zip ties around the brake shoe assembly about 1/8-1/4" in from the edges and horsed them down as tight as they would go. That compressed everything enough to get the drum over the first edge, cut the first zip tie, drum up to the second, cut that one, then all the way home. I figure everything else will just work itself out in service.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 04:12 pm:

Rick, I would ditch the grinder on the cams. That is a step from which it is most difficult to step back. If the linings don't fit, the fault is in the linings. Just make them fit.
As a further incentive not to modify your cams, I believe the new replacements on offer are made in two pieces and are less than satisfactory due to the method of construction. The originals are a one piece forging.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 10:54 pm:

I measured another set there is a difference. mine is thicker. Thanks guys!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 01:42 am:

BELOW IS A REPOST FROM MY CONTRIBUTION IN "WHAT HAVE YOU DONE" THREAD. Twice I have done this now, twice I have had the same issues. Different cars both time - both mid 20's:


Well, a repeat performance for me. Last year we put new brake shoes (the standard Ford rear 'emergency' or 'parking' brake that operates in the rear drums) on a friend's T. Today we did my project car.

New 'one piece' shoes with bonded linings were ordered and delivered - they still look nice.

However, they are still just wrong and need the same fiddling to get them to work properly as last year.

Now some T'ers prefer the shoes in one piece, - if that works for you, then it works and you don't need to read further :-)

As for me, I believe that brake efficiency is greatly improved when you do not have to fight the casting to pull the brakes on nor should you have to 'adjust up' the brake rods by much when the linings are brand new. (A Test: hold the one piece casting at the top end in each hand and see what force is needed to spread it even a little!). In two pieces they pivot nicely on the pivot bolt and need no wasted effort fighting the casting.

That being so the process is:

Part A
1) I cut them in half at the pivot bolt hole.

2) grind back the cuts a little for clearance (because the hole does not fit snugly on new pivot bolts, so the shoes can rock against each other where you cut them instead of on the pivot bolt).

3) file the bolt hole to make it 'square' to the pivot bolt. (I find they have a 'lip' on one end of the hole (the inside end of the hole on my shoes). You can feel it with your finger running along the hole when the shoes are split apart. This edge can cause the shoe to 'rock' on the pivot bolt and not fit snugly at right angles to the pivot. Not all holes are properly at right angles to the shoes either....
If not fixed the shoes sit 'out' from the backing plate and not parallel to it all the way around and so not parallel with the drum either.

You should now have 2 shoes fitting neatly on the pivot bolt.

Part B
The shoes do not match the diameter of the hub - they are quite a bit smaller. For me that affects brake efficiency as you have to pull the lever quite a ways before the cams engage OR you have to adjust the cam lever quite a lot. If the shoes are in one piece that also puts a loading on all the shoes and cam = not good.

4) place shoes in a vice and 'stretch' them a bit at a time by closing the vice up and then checking to the drum for good fit. Not hard to do and you can get quite accurate with this.

You should now have 2 shoes fitting neatly on the pivot bolt AND are the same diameter as the inside of the drums.

Part C
That brings up another issue, the gap between the flat ends of the shoes and the brake cam is now a little bit too large. This means you must adjust the cam even further before it engages so that now the cam is already over 2/3rds up the ramp BEFORE you even put the brakes on...

OR you have to add a spacer between the cam and the shoe end (one solution).

5) fit the shoes, place the cam in the 'off' position. Put the drum on about 1/2 way so you can see the cam and shoe ends. Pull the brake cam 'on' gently and measure the amount of movement needed to engage the shoes.

6) make up two shims - one for each shoe end - and slide them between the cam and shoe. It may take trial and error to find the thickness needed for each shim (they must be the same thickness). I found I needed 2 shims of about 7/64" each in thickness!! Now that would mean Excessive adjustment if you try to use the shoes 'as delivered' to you.

7) When satisfied, fit them to the shoe . We did a bit of 'dab' welding with correct rods for the shoe material, one each side of the shoe. Brazing is not recommended as the heat can affect the bonded linings.


RESULT
Nicely fitting shoes snug (but not dragging) in the drum and a positive engagement action when you pull on the brake lever with minimal movement or adjustment needed on the cam. You can save adjustment now for when the linings wear!

Hope that helps you in yours :-)

Note: we used new replacement cams and put new bushes in as well..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer --- Klaaswaal NL on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 03:56 am:

Rick ; I had the same problem, So i had to turn them down on a Lathe.
0114M
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 06:51 am:

He already has two piece brake shoes: it a 26 Improved car. No need to mess with the shoes themselves, just get the linings at the right thickness if everything else is clean, properly adjusted, tolerances correct, and installed properly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 11:51 am:

Perhaps your brake cam isn't releasing all the way. If not readjust the clevis. I like to check them with a good cam and a brake drum on the bench before installing anything.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration