Automobile train 1918 Westmoreland Kansas-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Automobile train 1918 Westmoreland Kansas-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 07:39 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 07:45 am:

I think I can, I think I can, I think I can...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 09:00 am:

Under perfect conditions: Straight, level, properly gauged, new or well maintained track, with good wheels/bearings, properly aligned, it takes ONLY 9 pounds of push or pull to move ONE TON on the railroad. Theoretically, if all things were perfect, it will take 900 pounds of force to move a 100 ton (gross weight) rail car.

I'm guessing, he's got no more than 10 ton behind the car.

Really like the dog in the front seat.

Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 09:13 am:

1910-11 Mitchell Model S. Six cylinder. Neat photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 09:22 am:

I think the guy on the back of the train is scratching his head hoping that they don't try to make a sharp left onto those other rails! :-)

Chris,
What is the HP of a Mitchell like that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 10:11 am:

I believe they were rated at 50 hp. I think they are 4 1/4 x 5 which is 425ci.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lew Morrill on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 10:19 am:

Not a happy face in the group. How might all the extra tracks been used? Did they bring in other "trains" to move the freight to a different route similar to how freight companies unload and regroup freight consolidating is done with trucks today?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Humphrey on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 10:22 am:

Looks like it was a short run....

Only 7.5 to 8 miles between the two. And it says Daily Auto Service.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 10:23 am:

Looks like a turntable.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 10:27 am:

I think the car/power is setting on a small primitive turn table? Bud in Wheeler,Mi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 10:44 am:

Terry, interesting rail stats ! Thanks for that. Caption says six tons of freight - good call !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 11:10 am:

I believe that "locomotive" is what you call a 4-2-0.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 11:19 am:

Rich,

You're right on the 6 tons. I didn't even see that caption. And YES, it is on a turn table. The other tracks would have been for storage or more likely maintenance/repairs to other equipment. Often, the turn table was use to turn the locomotive power around as it was the most space economical way. Yep, the locomotive would have been classified as a 4-2-0 but more likely was labeled as a rail bus. Here in Colorado it would have been called a Galloping Goose. How that came about, I'm not sure.

Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 12:41 pm:

Interesting, primitive turn table. Must have been for cars only. I can't see putting a multi ton locomotive on that thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 01:08 pm:

Primitive turn table, yes. They don't seem to have the accompanying roundhouse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 03:06 pm:

Looks like a pony in the front seat !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 04:19 am:

Man that guy sitting on the running board looks like he is thinking about skinning and eating the photographer.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 07:17 am:

I question whether that is a turn table, I can't vision how that would line up with the other rails and the rails the car is setting on looks a foot higher. the tables I seen were round maybe it is the camera angle but I would vote for a scales. the rails that is fooling us into thinking it is a turn table, with no more ties would sage and spread and derail the car. Now days rail roads have pre gage section ready for a quick fix for a derailment or washout.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 08:10 am:

Eugene,

The table is inside of an octagonal retaining framework. If you look below the rear axle of the pilot truck, you can just see the center pivot in the weeds.

As was often done, ties were expensive and were spaced very widely when not necessary for heavy loads, high speeds, lots of traffic. Being in a "yard" environment, the traffic would be light, slow, and unloaded, thus, closely spaced ties were not needed.

In looking at the spurs, I am wondering if that isn't a 5 foot broad gauge railroad. It just looks like wider than the standard 4'8 1/2". Could be just the camera angle.

Cheers,
Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 08:45 am:

What does the guy in center of the first car have his foot on? Brakes? Also what is the crude wooden contraption attached to the side of the second car? Some kind of loading ramp?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 12:25 pm:

Sure looks like the brake pedal to me. The linkage goes down to the center of the car and out to the wooden brake shoes. That must have been an expensive car, back in the day. Most of them did not come with brakes. Having the brakes was nice but then required a man to ride the car to apply them as needed. Not sure I would like to do that in December or January. On a nice spring day, that's another story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Susanne on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 01:25 pm:

The only ones that don't seem like they're ready to tear the face off the photographer is the livestock in the back of the car. Then again, maybe the reason they're all in such "jovial moods" is they get to travel back with the mule. I think at that I'd rather be the brakeman...


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