Were Left Hand Drive Model Tís In Use in Great Britain in 1916?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Were Left Hand Drive Model Tís In Use in Great Britain in 1916?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan Woolf on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 10:33 am:

A friend is doing historical research and posed a question to me about the use of left and right drive cars in Great Britain in 1916. More specifically the question would also relate to Model Tís. I know they drive on the left side of the road but were left hand drive Model Tís used in Great Britain in the early to mid-19-teens? I am not sure when right drive Model Tís were commonly available in Great Britain, Canada, or Australia.

It was an interesting question and I donít know the answer.
Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 10:48 am:

The earliest UK cars were imported with LHD.
By late 1909, the UK was supplied with RHD, and Trafford Park (opened in 1911) built only RHD except for the period 1919 to 21 after the generator was introduced and it took 2 years to sort a solution for RHD steering.
In 1916 there will have been some LHD Ts, but only from 1909.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 11:29 am:

When I started work on my 1909, I purchased the ďbuild sheetĒ for the serial number (111xx) of my T from Ford Archives. There was some discussion regarding the middle 1 as to was it a 1 or a 7 so I bought both sheets. Both indicate the vehicles were shipped on Oct 4, 1909.
My car 111xx was sold in the state of Michigan while 117xx was shipped to London, England. There is no mention of it being RHD, so a reasonable assumption is that is it LHD.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 12:13 pm:

There are two book writen by Neil Tuckett and Bruce Lilleker that tell the all story of the model T in G.B.

"The English Model T Ford, A Century of Model T in Britain" ISBN978 0 95601 18 0 0 and:
"The English Model T Ford, Volume 2 - Beyond the Factory" ISBN978 0 95601 18 3 1 .

Good luck
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 12:25 pm:

In the first book, on page 17, it say:
The Model T received its World Launch at the London Motor Show, Olympia, which opened 13 November 1908.
Its price was £225.-

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan Woolf on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 07:02 pm:

Guys, thanks for the answers. They help answer the question about T's in Great Britain.

Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 04:02 am:

The new book by John Stokes about Ford in New Zealand suggests that Canadian-made Ts sent there followed the same trend as in Britain - LHD initially, but RHD by late 1909.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 11:03 pm:

All the Model Ts in British Columbia Canada up to about 1920 were right hand drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 02:57 am:

Re-purposed Model T with RHD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Norton on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 04:43 am:

Left- and right-hand traffic (LHT and RHT) - Canada
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left-_and_right-hand_traffic#Worldwide_distributio n_by_country
and then scroll down to Canada.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 10:00 am:

Does anyone have a photo of the engine/steering set up for a RHD Model T, if so would you post it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 11:20 am:

You mean like this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 05:30 am:

Alan Woolf I know so little about the T story in Britain, but I think the following is reliable.

Chris Barker's comment above, that the first Model Ts in NZ were in left-hand drive, is correct. But it does not follow that this was the case elsewhere - I have not studied elsewhere.

But I have studied Ford of Canada. FoC was very quick to offer right-hand drive - the first RHD cars arrived in NZ probably in the third quarter of 1909.

Of course, Britain also drove on the left - and Ford in Detroit supplied the cars/parts of Britain (ie not Canada). To the best of my knowledge the Ts in Britain were RHD from very early on, right through until the end of World War One. That said, during WW1 production of civilian cars in Britain pretty much came to a standstill in favour of war production.

When civilian production resumed, because of the desperate shortages of men and materials, Ford of Canada did sell some cars to Britain, to relieve the backlog. I know nothing about the specs of those cars. Then the British story becomes a tad complicated. But it is covered in my FORD IN NEW ZEALAND book simply because it is such a contrast to what happened in Canada and her markets (of which Britain was not one!).

The first shipment of Ts to NZ from Canada comprised 10 cars - 7 of those were left-hand drive. The evidence is only anecdotal but it would appear Ford and other makers would send anything to met our demand - and we'd buy it!

Post-WW1 in Britain, for different reasons, only LHD Fords were available up to early 1922, before RHD was restored. Again, the reasoning is covered in my book.

The other book that is worth referring to is called "The English Model T Ford" by three experts on the subject, authors Martin Riley, Bruce Lilleker and Neil Tuckett. That book is well worth having.

In summary, in 1916 I would say that, if you could get a Ford at all for domestic use rather than military use, it will have been RHD. Consulting that book will confirm or otherwise.

John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 11:59 am:

Thanks for the photo, kinda tight in there. Like the manifold clamps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 03:00 pm:

Tight fit alright, getting the genny out is a pain, gotta take the inlet manifold off, the latest type of vendors alternators don't fit either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 06:17 pm:

Hi All

Here are some pictures of a 1910 Canadian RHD T with the original and correct style of throttle and timing linkage.

RHD cars have the carburater throttle arm 90 degrees different than the LHD and the timer control linkage is connected to the bottom of the timer, upside down from the LHD.

Also, on the steering column the throttle and spark are on the opposite sides.

The original linkage is simple and only one rod, but it must have a ball/socket joint steering column end.

Most RHD cars that I have seen have "homemade" linkages that are very different and more complex then the original.

Also, it should be noted that the throttle lever on the steering column changed a couple years later to a slightly curved one that the linkage fit on a bit easier.

Drive Safe
Jeff
Nova Scotia
Canada


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 06:41 pm:

Jeff
On your photo of the 1 Engine can you read the Serial #?
-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 07:30 pm:

Hi Don

Its not my car so I can only share part of the number. 25,5XX.

Made in Walkerville, Ontario.

Jeff
Nova Scotia


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