Show your colourized Ford Picture...or what colour is your Ford?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Show your colourized Ford Picture...or what colour is your Ford?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 10:52 am:

It may be fun to show a colourized photo of your car from an original black and white photograph. A friend of mine (Willis) saw a photograph from the 1970's of my father tuning his 1922 Coupe. He colourized the original. For your comments criticisms and general all round fault finding expertise I and sharing the original and the colour version.

Who knows it may become as infamous as Henry sitting in a field....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 11:11 am:

That is nice to have. It reminds me of this discussion we had on one of Jay's photos a while back. I mentioned my Father's Kodak transparent oil color tinting set. It will be fun to see others comments.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/484799.html?1412935809


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 04:31 pm:

Colorizing photographs goes back a lot further than most people realize. Somewhere in my long buried "I used to collect this stuff", is the earliest streopticon slide I ever owned (only seen a handful of others in museums or shows). No dates, but a style of card that was mostly used about the 1870s. Sadly, badly damaged long before I got it, a colorized still-life. It was still amazing to look at in my steropticon viewer.
In the later Victorian era, the 1880s and 1890s, colorization of photographs became very popular. Many of them would be difficult to tell from one of Richard Eagle's paintings today. They were artistically done, into a complicated multi-color printing process and produced for sales all over the world. However, the actual printing for the higher quality products was only done in a few places in the world. Lesser quality copies became more common after about 1900, and among other places, can be found on many postcards from the first few decades of the twentieth century.
In my large extended family, there are many beautifully colorized B&W photographs, my parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and more, dating from the '10s through the '40s even. The earliest one I know of (I don't know who wound up with it?), was from my grandparents wedding in 1915. A large, nicely colorized, photo that hung on the wall of their home for about 70 years.
Before practical and affordable color photography, colorizing B&W photos was common, and many artists made a good living doing the work. Now, simple computer programs can do the job. I think it would be neat to see lots of photos done up nice!

George J D, That picture looks great! A wonderful view into the past, with a personal (for you) connection. It looks very much like a lot of the era colorized pictures did. I am not about to "pick it apart" in any way!

Another observation by me. I find it amusing that some of us "into" the history and era for so many years get so used to black and white pictures, that they hardly can even notice when an old B&W movie shows up on the big screen TV. The mind becomes so used to interpreting the B&W images, that they just look normal. Many "normal" people today can hardly see or understand images (or movies) in B&W. Hence the drive to colorize so many shows in order to make them palatable to a modern audience and preserve (?) the programs in a modified artform. Meanwhile, those of us in the hobby go to some lengths to take photos of our cars in B&W and appropriate settings trying to duplicate the original era look.
Now we take those and colorize them?
Hey?! It is all good. I love it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 05:00 pm:

You are entering my area of expertise. The first stereo (3-D) photographic images were two daguerreotypes made on silver plated copper plates. These became popular in the late 1840s - early 1850s. You might be surprised to hear that stere daguerreotypes of that period were not only beautifully hand tinted, but the best colorized plates were early pornography.

Ambrotypes on glass (1850s) and tintypes on metal plates (1850s-1890s) were also hand colored as were paper prints throughout the history of photography; some of the best were albumen prints from Japan.

The first practical full color photographic process was the Autochrome introduced in 1903. These were transparencies (you have to hold them up to the light to view) and rely on small potato starch particles dyed orange, violet and green. Given when the process was available there must be some out there of model T Fords. There were many taken in WW I. I'll ask around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 05:20 pm:

This is not a model T Ford ... but it's a full color (not hand colorized) autochrome plate of a T era auto. I'm sure there must be some autochromes of model T Fords out there, though most photographers prefered shooting more colorful subjects.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 06:30 pm:

Thanks to everyone for starting/sustaining this thread. I've learned a lot from it and the images are spactacular. jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Bunyip on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 06:37 pm:

It's not a Ford but there is a bit of info on Autochrome photographs here:

https://jalopnik.com/this-is-the-very-first-color-photograph-of-a-car-1641925578


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 06:47 pm:

I'll find one and post it here. By the way ... the additive color screen first used in the autochrome process is the basis of TV, phone and computer screens. Look at any of these devices with a strong loupe and you'll see the orange, violet and green colors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 08:01 pm:

Bingo ! Here is an actual vintage color autochrome photograph showing a model T.

T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 09:06 am:

Question - is Autochrome a form of colour photography or colourization ? From the description Autochrome is not hand colouring a black and white photograph, but an early form of colour photography.

On the forum was an 1918 photo of Henry Ford that was colourized using a computer.


https://www.ilfordphoto.com/hand-colouring-black-white-prints/?___store=ilford_b rochure


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 09:24 am:

George, the autochrome is an actual chemical color photographic process. It's a glass plate covered with a random dot coating layer of dyed potato starch particles in orange, violet and green. The color dot layer is coated with a sensitive gelatin emulsion.

The plates were exposed in the camera with the uncoated side towards the lens so that the light reflecting off the subject and coming through the lens into the camera must pass through the three color starch filters. Reverse development creates black silver deposits that obscure the colors you don't want ... allowing the correct colors you do want to show.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 05:17 am:

Mark, those autochrome pictures are amazing! I had no idea that color pictures that well done were around that early. Thanks for posting those. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 01:54 pm:

Nice pics, and very interesting info. Thank you, Mark, and everybody. Dave in Bellingham,WA
PS, nice pile of slabwood in picture one, used to be a common sight, when I was a kid.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 03:29 pm:

Great thread! A few years ago I tried to use an iPad app to "colorize" black and white pics with little success. After seeing this thread I thought technology may have improved (I'm sure it has) and found this quick and easy way to try. If there were a way to establish a few base colors, I think it would work very well (and maybe there are with the pay version?):

http://demos.algorithmia.com/colorize-photos/

Henry Ford riding with a K tester,
Before:


After:


Photo "colorized" of our 1906 Ford, taken at a Ford dealership in 1925:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 05:41 pm:

Rob

That website is fun, the computer instant colored this one, looks nicer now :-)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 05:58 pm:

This is Walter Wanderwell with Unit 2, traveling in the USA, 1921, on his way around the world in Model T's



Computer colorized


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 08:15 pm:

Does it count if I colourized it myself... poorly?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 09:57 pm:

Dan, I played with a photo editor app after using the coloring link. Not sure it helps that much, but a way to enhance some pics. Here's yours with more work. I was going for better skin colors but not sure it helps....



This is a photo of a 1907 Model K accident that created national headlines. The black and white is a poor quality book copy. I think colorizing makes a big difference. I suspect the car was gray or cream colored, although I have encountered reports of two yellow colored K Roadsters:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 07:52 am:

The trick with coloring black and white pictures is to desaturate the colors. You only need a little to give the impression if color. Also, remember that the dark (black) areas will always be black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 10:22 am:

Mark, would you play with this site and see if there are any tricks to it? Would a hint of color help it determine shape color? It seems to recognize faces, trees sky and grass? Thanks for the info you've provided.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 10:52 am:

Rob

I think the original image quality has a lot to do with the site's computer coloring. Have tried some and results are poor, other the results are rewarding.....fun to do! Color such brings such glamor to the B/W old photos!



1921 running around in FL, note the palms...


Computer color!

And later, 1924,by this time in Japan, with Aloha along side Walter Wanderwell, Unit 2 with some changes from traversing the world.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 11:07 am:

Wasn't film of the Model T era orthographic, causing red to appear black or nearly black in photos? I believe that insensitivity to red light is why the little window to show picture numbers on the back of the camera is red.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:03 pm:

It adds to washed out pics too, sometimes.....




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:06 pm:

A little to much on the Color YELLOW but still like them
-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:10 pm:

Steve,

Film in the model T era was available in both ortho-chromatic or pan-chromatic. Used for different purposes. Panchromatic was invented around 1903 and is the reason why full color photography dates from the same time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:17 pm:

Here is how photographic processes recorded color in monochrome before 1900. This particular comparison is wet collodion, the process used from 1851-1880. A very useful chart for historians when looking at vintage photographs since bright yellow subjects can appear totally black in the final photographs.

Note the blue and white table cloth. This is why you never see natural clouds in early photographs.

test


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:18 pm:

Here is how photographic processes recorded color in monochrome before 1900. This particular comparison is wet collodion, the process used from 1851-1880. A very useful chart for historians when looking at vintage photographs since bright yellow subjects can appear totally black in the final photographs.

Note the blue and white table cloth. This is why you never see natural clouds in early photographs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 06:30 pm:

Excellent examples or professional colorized photos at today's Old Motor.

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=168460


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