OT - Glue Storage

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: OT - Glue Storage
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 10:00 pm:

I realize that glues, adhesives, RTV, etc. all have a certain "shelf life" that, quite frankly, could be a bit longer in my opinion. However, to make matters worse, I have been led to believe in the past, that it is a huge mistake to leave tubes of most types of glue in an unheated shop or garage over the winter, if there is any chance that the interior of the shop/garage may become cold enough for the glue to freeze. Supposedly, if a tube or squeeze bottle of glue freezes just once, it then becomes unusable thereafter. So, my question is, is this true or not??? In other words, for example, a plastic squeeze bottle of Gorilla Glue left in freezing conditions over the winter might as well be thrown away come Spring. Is this true? Thanks in advance to anyone who knows,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By marvin turner on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 10:22 pm:

I think it depends on the kind of glue. Epoxy is ok and i keep super glue in the freezer for years and it is fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Friday, February 02, 2018 - 10:25 pm:

Hi, Harold. I just always keep that kind of stuff in the refrigerator. Extends the shelf life through the hot summers but doesn't freeze.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 09:11 am:

Harold,

It greatly depends on the individual product. Some are "freeze proof" and some not. Read the label and spec. sheet if you can find one.

I have found, placing the item in a good air tight bag and squeezing out as much air as you can before sealing, will keep the product for much longer. Removing or greatly reducing the air supply to air/moisture cured adhesives, greatly improves shelf life.

Keeping some items in the refrigerator, is a good idea. I haven't been able to determine if it's the temperature or the lack of humidity, that improves shelf life. A refrigerator will slowly dehydrate an item, thus the reduced humidity would be good on preserving a moisture cured adhesive.

Most of us have had a tube of silicone sealant, rock up on us. Makes me madder than heck. With the plastic bag trick, I keep my ultra black ready for use and just about forever.

Good Luck,
Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Saturday, February 03, 2018 - 09:28 am:

Good tip Terry......thank you. I've had an almost new tube of sillycone go hard after only two months and that gets expensive!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Lyon, PDX, OR. on Sunday, February 04, 2018 - 12:34 am:

I try to store my glues, including PVC pipe glues, stored upside down. It keeps the lids from drying out and the contents fresh, Don.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 01:48 am:

Polyurethane Glue such as Excel and I think the Gorilla glue is somewhat the same are most definitely supposed to be kept refrigerated. Excel can even be frozen to keep it longer. I got this info directly from the tech support people who import the stuff. It was used in Europe for more than a decade before being introduced here according to that same source. He also told me that if it did dry in the plastic bottle such that it skinned over on top that I could cut away the skin and the glue underneath would still be OK to use.

I like the Excel brand because it takes a fairly long time to dry and for me that is good since when I am making things like box joint cabinets and such, it takes time to get everything coated with glue and the clamps all in place and things like White glue or yellow glue are sometimes fully dry in the time it takes to assemble and clamp something together when you have a one man shop. Most of these PE glues (Excel and Gorilla for example) are working hard to reduce their 2 hour assembly and 24 hour load test drying times but Excel is NOT doing that. Gorilla I think dries in less than 25% of the time that Excel does. I don't like that.

Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 08:44 am:

Be Careful

Something to remember when storing glue in a refrigerator is watch out for young children and grandchildren getting into the refrigerator thinking it is a snack food or cold treat. Even stored in a refrigerator in our shop young folks can get into it faster then we can turn around. Keep it up high and well back out of reach and well labeled.

A lot of glues look like honey.


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