Rear Windows on Runabout Top

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Rear Windows on Runabout Top
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 09:48 am:

I see that the rear windows in the back on a '23 runabout feature two horizontal windows in the cloth. Were these simply sewn in ... or were metal frames used. I have some NOS accessory metal frames for model T that could be used for either glass or nitro-cellulose plastic sheeting. I plan to use the nitro-cellulose sheeting since I can make that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 09:53 am:

Sewn.

If you go with accessory metal frames, use glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 10:40 am:

What ever you do, make sure you get the measurements correct! Take a look at some restored cars. The rear windows on a lot of them are horrible, simply because the owner, or the trimmer didn't bother to do the proper research.
When I made the top for my '25 roadster, I found that no one anywhere made the proper binding to go around the back window. (it's also the same stuff used on side curtains). So, I had it made special for Model T's, and now Classtique buys it from me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:28 pm:

How does one do "research" when many cars out there may not have been restored authentically? Wouldn't the only real option be to find an original unrestored top?

Are you talking about the "trim strip" as in a simple folded and sewn strip of material?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:41 pm:

This was the last major sewing project I did. I found a leather sofa on the curb and recycled the material for my old speedster. I built the wood seat cushion frames and installed/tied the springs. Then sewed the curved pieces for the back and sides with no patterns. The first one is easy ... making the book matched other side ... less so. Liked that the final seats looked as though they had been there for years.



seats


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Bocchi on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 11:25 am:

Wow! Mark i'm impressed with that work. That aged couch really makes it look old-time. What did you use for stuffing and padding?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 11:33 am:

I used cotton batting and horse hair for stuffing. What you see here is the horse hair. Designing the five leather panels on each back and side bucket to have the correct curves was the hardest part. This seat assembly had no bottom cushions so I have to make the wood framework and build it from scratch with springs, canvas, cotton and horse hair. It was very comfortable. That's why I'm thinking that making a top may not be so hard for me. I used to design and make dresses for my wife years ago.


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