Old Photo - Model T by a new house

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old Photo - Model T by a new house
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 12:38 pm:

new


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 03:08 pm:

Appears to be a '13 wide track with Victor No. 1 gas lamps.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 03:26 pm:

Ken-
How can you tell it is a wide track viewing it from the side?
-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 05:08 pm:

Herb,

That's not a new house it must be at least a 100 years old by now! :-)

That tool box looks quite large and the horn is mounted properly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 07:08 pm:

Do you suppose it's that fat lady's house that's a-building ? She looks pretty happy - nice '13 touring to drive, and a brand new house soon. Life is good in 1914 . . . or so


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 09:27 pm:

Keith,

The rear fender appears to be wider than the running board right at the "tear" in the photo where they come together. Wide track fenders curve in at the running board on that model and the extra width shows up there.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 05, 2018 - 09:40 pm:

This one cries out for some added contrast.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 10:42 am:

Maybe it's Kate Smith!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 09:35 pm:

I remember when houses were built like that. It was not so many years ago. Hand saws, hammers, no nail guns, no pre-cut studs. Drain pipes were cast iron with oakum and lead seals. Supply pipes were galvanized iron with putty sealing. no plywood and walls had let in diagonal bracing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 11:24 pm:

Good eye, Ken.
God Bless America...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 02:53 am:

Neil forgot 2x4s that actually are 2 x 4, not 1-1/2 x 3-1/2 .
My Dad taught me how to lead cast iron drain pipe together--I still have his tools for doing that!
Almost all the plumbing in my family's resort vacation cabins is galvanized pipe--the Dunsmuir water is very gentle on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 05:47 am:

And asphalt singles installed with galvanized nails, driven in one at a time. Sheet rock (dry wall) and "Rock Wool" insulation was just just catching on around here in the late '50's, at least that I saw as a kid back then. :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Bruno on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 01:58 pm:

1913. I notice there's no embossed bead across the wide front of the front fender. Also a bit of read door lifting up just behind the front seat. This was happening on the 13's because of a weak spot in the sills. The rear doors were opening especially with passengers in the back seat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 03:09 pm:

David, they don't have to use galvanized nails any more because asphalt shingles only last 10 to 12 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 04:03 pm:

Victor No. 1 headlamps and I just noticed E&J side lamps. It doesn't seem like the lamps were installed by Ford at the same time from five lamp sets. Mix or match I guess.

The generator also appears to be a Victor in that it has the vertical tank clamp levers. However, it doesn't seem to be a "hook" type Victor and is mounted in a three point running board bracket. Has anyone seen that type black & brass furnished by Victor?

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 06:57 pm:

David, I put asphalt shingles on with galvanized nails, but I use a roofing nail gun--much faster! Nope, I don't like staples! The new shingles sometimes have a 35 year guarantee. (probably longer than I'm going to be around!).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 04:53 am:

Our '94 mobile home has it's original asphalt shingles still on it and show no signs of giving out yet. But yes, I've seen much newer ones give out much sooner. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 09:18 am:

Maybe it's just our extreme hot and cold temperatures up here in MN? We will never get 35 years on a shingle put on today. In 1988 I put on a good quality shingle and replaced them after 20 years. I should have done it a few years earlier because I had to replace roof boards also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Susanne on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 11:33 am:

I didn't catch the wide track rear fender (that's pretty cool!), but did notice the position of the front wheel was all the way against the edgeline of the front fender... Had to look closely to see the '13 rear doors... too much grain!

Those were the days when houses were built right. One of my summer jobs in high school (through our local ROP program) was working for a company that restored houses; we were doing a "subdivision" that went in about the time that picture was taken... Beautiful work back then, even in these beat up old houses the craftsmanship was obvious! Learned the fine art of actual lath and plaster, should have stuck with it as there's money in it now! Also learned a bit about electrical work and painting (loved that!) and plumbing (hated that!).

One scene stands out in my mind - this kid, must have been 17 or so, running a radial saw, cutting down 4x8 sheets of asbestos to do backboards (for cast iron stoves, fireplaces, and kitchen stoves)... dust flying EVERYWHERE... and his "respirator" was a damp bandana...

Wonder if he's even still alive now...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 01:49 am:

Asbestos is funny stuff. It is not politically correct to say this, but it is usually not nearly so deadly as it is claimed to be. And yes, as a former contractor, and school maintenance worker, I have had to attend several asbestos safety seminars. Natural asbestos fibers are so common in so many areas of the country, and windblown any day the wind blows, that if asbestos was as bad as claimed (remember, most of those claims are by lawyers looking for sheep to shear), there are large regions in Califunny that would be deadly kill zones. One such area in South San Jose is home to nearly a million people, and the asbestos loaded hillside has been known for nearly a century and a half. Farmers a hundred years ago knew that the area was no good for farming (which in and of itself IS rather suspicious) because nothing of value could be grown there. But hey! You think those in power are going to let a ten square mile area of some of the most valuable land in the nation sit undeveloped?

The real danger has to do with individual DNA and immune systems. Some people are especially susceptible to its effects. I knew a very nice fellow that worked in a brake and clutch shop about forty years ago. Suddenly, with almost no warning, he developed asbestos related cancer at barely over 45 years of age and died a few months later.
This susceptibility is something I hope gets much more and better study soon. With DNA understanding, it should be possible to find who is susceptible early enough in their lives to avoid dangerous areas and careers.
There are many other potentially dangerous chemicals and compounds. Less than thirty years ago, I lost a good friend (in the antique Studebaker and Horseless Carriage crowd) because he had worked for many years in a business machines service and repair business. At the age of about fifty, he died due to organ failure because of exposure to a certain cleaning fluid. While the fluid is now considered a "known risk", most people that had been heavily exposed to it for a hundred years lived long, rich, and full lives. Something in his genetics made him more susceptible than most.
At this time, still. Discretion may be the better part of valor. Play it safe.

Susanne, I do hope the kid you knew is doing fine.

Wonderful Photo! We don't see enough original era photos of the elusive wide-track cars. Thank you all.


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