What degreasers do you recommend?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: What degreasers do you recommend?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 01:07 am:

I plan to disassemble a engine in a classroom. It is not conducive to have solvent. What degreaser have you been satisfied with?

Looking forward to your responses!

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 01:34 am:

Simple Green?? We use Cascade dish washing soap in our hot water parts cleaner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 02:46 am:

Simple Green 19128 Crystal Industrial Cleaner/Degreaser

This is not your regular Simple green. you can get it on Amazon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 07:42 am:

I discovered by accident a cheap product that cuts through grease and oil the best I've seen and it is cheap. It's called LA's Totally Awesome all purpose cleaner. You can get 20 ounce spray bottles for $1 at dollar tree but I buy it by the gallon for $6. I put it in a pump up weed sprayer and use it on airplanes. It melts the oil and dirt off the belly and makes engine cleaning a snap during annual inspections. Living in the insect capital of the world, the leading edge of the wings etc. are usually plastered with dead bugs. This stuff dissolves the bugs on contact (you can see them dissolve). A quick wipe with about anything (sponge, rag, etc., and it is ready to rinse. It really lives up to the name "totally awesome stuff".

For really heavy nasty stuff, I spray it on and using a parts brush scrub it, then rinse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 09:01 am:

In lieu of my favorite lacquer thinner, I have to agree with Gary. That Totally Awesome stuff does work well. On just about anything. And like he said, it's cheap, at the dollar stores. It was one of the few things that actually took all the green muffle-head bug spots off my fiberglass boats without staining the fiberglass. It was great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrett on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 09:18 am:

I use this...costs a little more, but it cuts grease, oil, gear lube, oxidized paint, etc. Use it full-strength or dilute 50/50 with water.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 09:32 am:

Purple Power does indeed work well. Be careful however of anything that has sodium hydroxide (lye) in it. When you get it on your skin and it feels slick, that is your skin dissolving. But, as Mike said it does work well. Goggle and gloves are in order.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 04:25 pm:

I use Totally Awesome on heavy grease and it works well. No fumes like brake cleaner or lacquer thinner, BUT... A word of caution, wear a mask if you are spraying it. It will melt the linings in your lungs along with the grease. No kidding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 07:26 pm:

Sounds like Purple power and Totally Awesome are about the same as what we used to have where I worked called Kelite (sp) We had to discontinue it's use not sure why, but when we used it you had to use it sparingly because it would pull the paint off of whatever we were trying to clean. Also when using you tried not to inhale the fumes because it would take your breath away. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 09:19 pm:

I run my parts through the dishwasher but only when my wife will be away for a few days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marc Roberts, York, Pennsylvania on Tuesday, February 06, 2018 - 10:54 pm:

If bare skin safety is a concern, Dawn dish washing liquid with relatively little water might be worth considering. You may have seen news footage of it being used to clean and save the lives of wild birds after oil tanker accidents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 01:02 am:

Dawn is really good too. I also use Mean Green which I think is about the same as Simple Green. A shot of Mean Green in the washing machine works wonders on greasy/oily clothes too, not that any of us would know what those are. :-) :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 01:23 am:

For baked on oil and grease, Easy Off Oven Cleaner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 04:19 am:

Good one Jim, I forgot about that. I haven't used it yet myself, but I have heard many times it works great. Thanks for reminding me. On a side note, I tried some of the new "ordorless" lacquer thinner to clean up some dried boiled linseed oil, and it wouldn't touch it. If I'm not mistaken, the old lacquer thinner should have dissolved it in short order. Am I right? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 04:22 am:

Forgot to ask, what would dissolve dried boiled linseed oil that wouldn't break the bank and be readily available? Thanks, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Blair on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 05:05 am:

I have only used this a few times this winter. I wanted to try a small hot tank so I bought a 20.00 turkey roaster and use Borax, Washing Soda and Dawn dish liquid in it and it cleans parts pretty well. Turn it up to about 200į-350į for an hour or so and use a small brush to clean it with. The parts dry off quickly when you have them clean and blown a little air on them. Cleans out the passages on my old John Deere B carburetor very well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 05:36 am:

Matt, I'm sure glad you started this thread. I've learned a lot! :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 10:47 am:

Dave, a soaking in straight grain alcohol will remove dried boiled linseed oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 09:04 pm:

Thanks Rich. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 12:32 am:

Wow! Lots of great responses! I agree with Dave it a lot to learn here.

I am looking to clean parts with students, so the least toxic the better.

I guess that puts dish-washing soap at the top of the list.

The home made parts tank sounds like number 2.

How toxic is Purple Power and Simple Green?

Thanks,

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 12:58 am:

Purple Power and Zep Industrial Purple contain sodium hydroxide- a strong base. You don't want to inhale the mist from a sprayer or use it with bare hands. Being a strong base, it will etch aluminum if left in contact for any time.
Simple green is a totally different animal and in my experience is much less aggressive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 07:19 am:

Hey Matt, it sounds like this could be a class project or homework assignment. We could get a real study of cleaners. All us grease covered shade tree mechanics and their washing machines could benefit. And you may have a budding chemist in there! Good luck with your class, and cheers! Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 09:02 am:

My two cents, for carburetor and small part cleaning I have been using a crock pot and the original formula (with pine oil) Pine-Sol with water. I understand that most Pine-Sol products do not use pine oil with the exception of the "original formula", but I've had no issues finding it in stores. This is on cast steel Model T carburetors, I'd be hesitant using it to clean aluminum. The other nice thing is the nostalgic memories of going to school and the first thing you smelled was the Pine-Sol used to clean the desks/room. Tons of information on the internet about it's use to clean parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 10:56 am:

Plain old white vinegar. It may smell but it cleans grease and oil. Want clean streak free glass, Put vinegar in a spray bottle diluted 50/50 with water I do my windshield and side windows. It works great for house windows too. It will remove bugs, tar, grease, oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nunn on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 01:51 pm:

Denny, white vinegar will also rid your barn of skunk odors that remain after the barn cat chased him out. Boil it on a wood stove and let it steam. You can also wash said barn cat and the, uh, human too. Trust me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 04:23 pm:

I just tried some of the LA's Totally Awesome all purpose cleaner from the 99 cent store. I really liked it but like other cleaners you need to be careful on painted surfaces.

Worked "totally awesome" on cleaning oil and I think might be very good removing carbon from the cylinder head as well. Can't beat the .99 price and it's made locally here in Buena park.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 12:46 am:

Denny,
It would be hard to get someone to argue the dangers of white vinegar!

Joe,
Pine-Sol sounds like it works very well too.

Perhaps I will have to try that and dish-washing soap:-) Actually a lot of rags will go a long ways too.

Thanks so much for all the ideas and thoughts.

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 09:35 am:

About once a year i burn a brush/tree pile on the farm.That being said,where will you get ride of your used nasty cleaning agent? I know of a few who will take a dirty engine to the self car wash.I realize one cannot call it the quarter car wash anymore!!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 09:48 am:

I tried to be responsible once and contacted a firm to see what it would cost to properly dispose of mineral spirits I had put in my parts washer. $$$$$$$ No thanks. The stuff did a fine job of starting fires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 09:56 am:

Anything, if used improperly, can be deemed unsafe, but if the proper safety precautions are exercised, such as using rubber gloves, goggles and cross ventilation, such as would be used with virtually any chemicals and, if directions are followed and the product used properly, "Easy Off" is probably the strongest, safest cleaner one can use. Millions of housewives use it everyday to clean their ovens in a closed up house, so it has to be safe.

If you are doing this in as classroom environment, instead of teaching your students to be afraid of and avoid certain products that are otherwise good and will do the job they require,it would be a good opportunity to teach the students the proper safety precautions to take, in using potentially hazardous products. The students should learn it now, from a teacher, in a safe setting, instead learning it the hard way, on their own, in the privacy of their garage, which is how most of us learned it. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 10:09 am:

Anything, if used improperly, can be deemed unsafe, but if the proper safety precautions are exercised, such as using rubber gloves, goggles and cross ventilation, such as would be used with virtually any chemicals, if directions are followed and the product used properly, "Easy Off" is probably the strongest, safest cleaner one can use. Millions of housewives use it everyday to clean their ovens in a closed up house, so it has to be safe, if used properly.

Even though it is one of the most dangerous products one can use, Muriatic Acid is, to me, is one of the most crucial and useful products in my garage, for removing rust down to the bare metal, yet I have used it safely for over 50 years without incident because I use all the necessary safety precautions. If I had been taught to be deathly afraid of it, there are so many things I would not have been able to do on my Model T, that it boggles my mind.

If you are doing this in a classroom environment, instead of teaching your students to be afraid of and avoid certain products that are otherwise good and will do the job they require,it would be a good opportunity to teach the students the proper safety precautions to take, in using potentially hazardous products. The students should learn it now, from a teacher, in a safe setting, instead learning it the hard way, on their own, in the privacy of their garage, which is how most of us learned it.

Teaching young people to be afraid of the products one needs to use in, what should be, a fun hobby, is the easiest way to drive them away from it, instead of attracting them to it. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 01:08 pm:

Sorry about the double post. Computer burped in the middle of posting this and I wasn't sure if it went through the first time. Better to post twice than to risk losing it altogether and have to formulate the thought all over again...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 10:06 am:

Jim brings up a most excellent point. Anytime you are helping a kid out, use it as a method to teach about more than just the task at hand. Young teens should know what an MSDS is and what is contained in them as well as where to get one. If you are an oldster and donít know what Iím talking about you have some learning to do for yourself.

My grandson knows there is a reason I donít use power tools without ear / eye protection. (Used to, which is why he is being taught early).

We all only get one shot at protecting our health. Make it count.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 11:23 am:

I totally agree with Gary. On a side note, the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) has been replaced by the SDS (Safety Data Sheet).

The requirements for the MSDS were basically; make one and include all of this information. So, every MSDS was different based on the company that put it together. YES, they all included the required info but in any format the company decided upon.

Then, it went world wide. Now, it is required to have the information in a prescribed format, using Universal pictograms. These are a little different than the ones used in the MSDS.

All in all, I believe it's a better system as you will ALWAYS find the same information in the same section on all SDS sheets. Just remember the pictograms and severity numbers are different than they were.

Great source of info, not only about the safety precautions and protective gear required, but about the product itself. Now we can tell how similar products are or are NOT.

Thanks for bringing it up Gary. Great comment about broader teaching. I believe it's better to give the children small doses of lesson information than to make it all into one big lesson on a specific subject. While each of us will not get 100% of the info, we will get some of it. Next time around, we will remember that "some" and add to that with a little more.

Have a great weekend,
Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Bunyip on Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 02:28 am:

I tried Simple Green 19128 Crystal Industrial Cleaner on a Hyatt bearing out of a veteran gearbox (not Ford) I'm tearing down at the moment.

The bearing was sitting in my ultrasonic cleaner with one end out of the bath for 15 minutes. It seemed to clean up quite nicely. I guess the grease is 50+ years old.










Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 08:14 am:

Joe,Without me asking a dumb question would you please tell about that engine?? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 12:56 pm:

Yeah what is that machine?
I use simple gree purple power or cascade then final soak in por15 marine clean


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Bunyip on Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 03:09 pm:

I think itís a REO from the teens. The photo shows the crankcase only. The rest of the engine is missing. The guy I got it off rescued it from the tip. Itís in extremely poor condition except for the rear axle and the gearbox.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Friday, February 16, 2018 - 01:49 am:

Well, well, weíll! Today I was working with the students. We took apart the axle and used....

Drum roll....

I should have gotten before/after pictures. If youíve ever worked on the rear axle you know what type of grease would be in there before. Here is after:


Rags with rubbing alcohol worked great!

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, February 16, 2018 - 02:16 am:

It's not what I would have used but, I must admit, I am very impressed with your results. Congratulations. Jim Patrick


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