Partially OT: Still shooting film

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Partially OT: Still shooting film
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 01:18 am:

Not fully trusting digital images to last decades or more, I still shoot some film as long as I can still get it. Unlike digital pictures, you don't see the ones on film until the roll is finished and developed. Recently I finished a roll I started in September, so here are the results.


At The Henry Ford, Dearborn.


Greenfield Village has one of the few operating roundhouses in the United States.


Getting around in style by Otto.


The village has a lot of historic buildings. Some are reconstructions, and some are the real ones moved in.


This quarter scale model of the first Ford factory houses the fifteen millionth Model T.


One of the 1909 Fords seen at the OCF.


Visitors help operate the turntable at the roundhouse.


All kinds of vehicles up to 1931 are seen at the OCF.


A 1931 Model A leads the way.


1907 Model K Ford. Guess who. :-)


Agitating for suffrage.


A typical street scene at the OCF.


1929 Dodge Brothers Senior.


Wright Brothers' home and bicycle shop.


A railroad circles the village.


1903 Model A Ford.


One of the new 1914 Model T's that carry visitors around the village.


Locomobile steamer, if I remember correctly.


1909 Row.


The Ford bus stays busy all weekend.


Parked outside Edison's lab.


Later in September I was headed home from Bartlesville when one of those old white tires blew out near Hewins. I phoned my cousin for a ride and brought out a spare wheel to drive home.


September is thistle season.


Assassinating Johnson grass with the sprayer.


A big dead cottonwood fell down and became firewood.


This piddling little snowfall on January 15 may be all we get. It barely covered the ground, but it was enough for a picture.


The Fourteenth Avenue bridge in Winfield, built in 1928, was closed January 22 to be replaced by a new bridge. I drove the runabout up to have its picture taken on the bridge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 01:27 am:

Very cool, Steve! Thanks for sharing. Hope to see you at the next OCF.

Cheers,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matt the Headlight Lens Guy n California on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 02:33 am:

Steve,
Wow! Great photos! You sold me on the museum!

Now I am confused how you think that the film will last longer than the forum. Do you think the forum servers will go kaput before your film deteriorates?

Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 05:48 am:

Nice images Steve. I still find it amusing when people ask if I’m using a “film” camera at work.

Matt, the interesting thing about film is that the negatives can be left in a box in an attic for decades and you can still extract information from them. A digital image can be lost forever in an instant by a dead hard drive or pushing the wrong button.

Color film however is on the cusp of obscurity. It’s the most complicated product ever offered to the consumer and will never be resurrected like LPs. Once the big wheels stop turning at Kodak ... we’ll never see its likes again. The only thing keeping color film alive are a handful of directors who have made a short time deal with Kodak. Once they stop buying the stuff ... the wheels will stop turning and the factories will be torn down.

Black and white film is a different matter. I demonstrate how to make that here at the George Eastman Museum and we have regular workshops in making 35mm and even gelatin glass plate negatives. There is a sub culture of fine art photographers making their own photosensitive materials from daguerreotype to gelatin emulsion papers, plates and films. Google “workshops at George Eastman House” to see what I teach.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 06:03 am:

Steve, great pics! Thank you for posting. See you at Chickasha.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 06:40 am:

Great pictures. Thank you for showing them to us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 07:32 am:

Mark, I think I know what you mean about color film, kind of. I have a bunch of color 35MM slides that I took in Vietnam in late '70 - early '71. I had some of them made into prints at our local CVS store a few years ago and they came out beautiful. I went back a couple of years later and they had changed out all of their machines and couldn't do them any more. Damn, sometimes I really hate progress. :-( :-( :-( Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 08:04 am:

When cleaning out my Grandfather's house after he passed in 1982 we found an undeveloped roll of film. We sent it out for processing and the full roll came back perfectly developed. What a surprise to see 20 some black and white photos of the 1936 Olympics in Berlin!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 09:40 am:

Print Film is still king. Great photographs.

Comment on the Greenfield Round house. There is an other "operating roundhouse." Located in Central Pennsylvania is also an operating round house of sorts. It belongs to the East Broad Top Railroad, aka the Kovalchick Company. The railroad has been out of operation as a tourist line since the 1990's, but does have a dedicated group of volunteers keeping up the maintenance.

The Kovalchick Family are also owners of the Kinzua Viaduct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 09:41 am:

As Mark says, digital images can disappear in an instant with an accidental stroke of the wrong key or the death of a hard drive. Physical images on film, glass, tin, etc., have survived, if well stored, for almost two centuries. When it comes to color, survival varies by product. Kodachrome has proved wonderfully stable.


This Kodachrome shot with Stoveoil and my little brother Mike was taken December 25, 1954, and the colors haven't changed. Other color films have not done as well.


This Kodacolor shot from 1944 is better than some others, but the colors have definitely shifted.

I've read that when Walt Disney started making color films he got around the problem of colors fading by shooting three b&w copies through red, green, and blue filters. Years later the filters and the three negatives could be used to make new color prints.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Royster on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 10:10 am:

Another place to go on my list, loved the bridge photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 10:29 am:

Steve, is that a VW underneath the cottonwood tree? How bad was it damaged?

I've had two vehicles wiped out by fallen trees. Not funny. Even less funny to my insurance company. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 10:52 am:

Yes Steve, Kodachrome was a form of chromogenic color film that required laborious processing but the results were a very archival stability. Ektachrome was invented during WW II with a simplified processing technique to allow processing in the field. Like so many things in photography ... quality is always sacrificed for speed or simplicity. There is no digital process that has as much resolution as several camera processes in the 1850s. But at least we don't need cast iron head imobilizers anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 11:53 am:

I have a 4X5 Graflex camera and a few boxes of B&W film. I have kept the film in a freezer for over 15 years and hope to take some photos of our Canadian Ford one of these days just to see how well they come out. You can't beat the resolution unless you use a 5X7 or larger format camera. Will have to develop it myself as there are no shops that do it near by. Awesome photos Steve.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 11:58 am:

Bob, the parts car was dented a little but not too bad.

Mark, I don't believe I've ever seen a head holder in person, only in pictures. One of my favorite nineteenth century photos was a portrait of a baby. His mother was hidden behind a blanket but you could see her fingers on the sides of his head as she held it steady for the camera.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JOHN BEVARDOS on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 02:31 pm:

Myself? Still shooting 8mm and super8 and slides.
As long as its still available ,its film for me . In regards to what Mark was saying on the processing , google k-14 film processing .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn-Colorado on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 10:57 pm:

Steve thank you for sharing those great photos!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 11:06 pm:

Steve,

Great shot of No 7. That was Henry Ford's personal locomotive on the Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad when he owned it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 01:06 pm:

Speaking of Roundhouses, there is a HUGE one, very recently built by a private individual (who just passed away, but apparently set up a foundation to keep the place going)called The Age of Steam Roundhouse, they have a website. Fascinating place.
http://ageofsteamroundhouse.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 01:33 pm:

There is a small engine turn around at the Museum in Poway and when I last went up the tower in Toronto Canada, I remember seeing one on the lake side. Is it still there?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 01:35 pm:

Great pictures Steve. Mind you most of the skill is in the eye of the operator, you are skilled.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 01:45 pm:

Oh, and no mention of roundhouse is complete without bringing up the one in Como, CO that has managed to survive and be restored to once more house a steam locomotive.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJ-tnYpq7Ow


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 04:14 pm:

My young cousin Molly still uses film. She feels that since each shot costs money, you learn to properly compose the photograph. I still have my Nikkormats, but confess that I prefer my D-80. I'm a Nikon geek - my father-in-law was a professional who invented a number of high-speed films. He worked for a company who took the photographs of the early nuclear tests. The issue was too much light, not too little. His company had shutter speeds to one millionth of a second. Most of the early films of nuclear tests were taken by him or his company. Charlie was a Nikon guy and so am I. He also taught me that peanut butter and onion sandwiches are great, and roast beef must be served with horseradish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn - Lincoln, NE on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 04:50 pm:

The roundhouse in Durango, Colorado burnt down in the early 1990s and was immediately rebuilt by the Durango and Silverton Railroad. It is very much in use to this day. The roundhouse was originally built in the 1880's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn - Lincoln, NE on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 05:06 pm:

Another photo of the Durango Roundhouse in use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 06:33 pm:

Steve
I have sent you a PM


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