How Was It Done?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: How Was It Done?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 07:03 pm:

It's probably been discussed before but I couldn't find anything in a search...

How were the original T tools finished? Were they painted or raven finish perhaps?

Looking for ideas, thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 - 07:28 pm:

All the original ones I have seen were black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 09:54 am:

The ones that came with Betsy (my '24) are thinly painted black, but a lot can happen in 94 years.

My bet is that they were raven finished (like Parkerizing). :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 10:34 am:

You see a lot of them painted black, but as Mark says, a lot can happen in 94 years. I've seen a great many that show no traces of any paint at all. Parkerizing would not surprise me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 10:48 am:

This photo off the web, shows some of the early factory tools, finish is very light, perhaps just a faint black paint. Expense for finishing tools would have been very low, so perhaps just simple paint means to retard rust on the steel tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 11:03 am:

Parkerizing did not make it's debut until WWII, when it was used to finish rifles, pistols and machine guns.

You may be thinking of black oxide (oxidizing), a finish used on many hand tools of the period....much more durable than paint. Kits for applying an oxide finish are available.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 11:06 am:

The tools supplied with later Model T's had no paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 11:15 am:

From what I was told in the 70's, before about 1890-1900 guns were browned and from that time onward, guns were blued but parkerizng genreally resulted in a grey color. In my small box of T tools, if they have any paint on them, it's black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 11:33 am:

I'm sure we have members who are better versed on firearms finishes than I am, Vern, you are correct that "browning" was more common early on, but blued finishes appeared as early as the 1850s. There are / were many different processes for developing a blue finish on steel, I'm unclear as to what is involved in "Parkerizing" or when the process was developed - I don't think it was much used on quality firearms.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 11:43 am:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkerizing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 11:56 am:

Rich is right. The P-53 Enfield was "blued" as the standard English military arm used both for their own military and exported. The appearance was not blue however it was black. Most of the vintage tools I have seen have that natural dark brown patina on them that develops over the years. A couple of tools I've seen have some type of black stuff on them, but I couldn't tell if its paint or just staining from dirty oil and grease.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 12:07 pm:

And a lot of US arms of the same vintage as the Pattern 1853 were unfinished "Arsenal Bright".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 12:22 pm:

My tools are light brown with an oil sheen...especially after using them with greasy hands!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 04:14 pm:

Looks like shiny paint on 1934 Ford tools :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 04:50 pm:

Seen many many Ford tools except the tire irons. Never saw any paint at all but they were always a dark color. Just metal really. Possible black wash but not sure they always look "plain".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 05:15 pm:

Dan, I need that cast plug spanner in your photo for my 1912 kit! Interesting 3 hole hubcap wrench. It appears to have straight sides rather than be necked in at one end.

I believe that the jacks were black painted.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Thursday, February 08, 2018 - 08:50 pm:

Looking at the band wrenches, pliers,screwdriver, and a few "monkey" wrenches I would say they had nothing at all on them. Screwdriver handle black once maybe. Some spares seem to have been painted black though, maybe older ones...JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Susanne on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 11:50 am:

I've seen a couple that look like they have the same thin black "wash" that was also on the engines... as if you took black enamel and thinned the heck out of it until it was mostly thinner, and then dipped the tool in it, let it run off and dry, and called it good.

But those are kind of the exception... the ones I've seen are usually this color that looks like rust... maybe because it is... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Dizer on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 04:49 am:

Could they have been "Japaned" which was used in that era for protecting inexpensive toys, bike lamps etc? It was a very thin paint floating on water that the item was dipped in. It dried faster than regular paint, speeding production, and was a very thin coating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 05:01 am:

Would they have been oil tempered? That leaves a nice black oxide type finish. Dave


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