Parts Question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Parts Question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grant J Barlow on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 04:26 pm:

So, I have a question. I have the '1919' TT that really more like a '26. When I am looking for parts at say Macs, for like the 'Model T True Fire Ignition System' the fitment tab lists every Model T style except the TT. Can I assume that all engine/ignition/starter etc. parts are the same for the cars and trucks?

Part 2: Since my coils are all out of the box and were supposedly rebuilt, probably 15 yrs ago, would you recommend using this Solid State Ignition system?

Thank you in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Danmark on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 04:29 pm:

The frontend of a TT truck is virually the same as the T except the frame is beefier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble Northern Michigan on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 04:39 pm:

TT shares most components with T except frame, rear end and rear wheels... well there is more, but that should give you an idea. So the engine is the same for the t and tt. Dont be in a hurry to modernize everything. The coil technology from 100 years ago is still good today. I recommend sticking with everything Ford did. No e timer, no true fire, no waterpump, nothing. Work on getting it running and hold off replacing what may be perfectly good systems / components. Get the manual and try to hook up with a local t club or local person with experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grant J Barlow on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 04:42 pm:

I have the manuals. I live in 'the middle of nowhere' , the nearest club is almost 100 miles away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Hansen on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 10:48 pm:

Manuals are of limited help. If you can find something like "Ford owner's Handbook of Repair and Maintenance" published by Floyd Clymer or other good repair handbooks, you should do fine. You can always ask here. I have been away from this forum for years. I agree with others, don't upgrade anything if the original still works, coils, timer, carb, head, manifold, wiring--all the same cars or trucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Friday, February 09, 2018 - 11:59 pm:

the national club has good videos of a lot of repair / overhaul work - good info, helped me


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 12:04 am:

Yep, all that stuff is the same. :-)
I'd try the coils and box first. :-)
I've been running around here with a 12V distributor on a T for 20 years. Works great!
Within the last couple of years, I now have two T's with coils & boxes....Works great!
Had the coils rebuilt on one and wow!
The other will WOW me when I have those coils redone.
Antiquated roller timers in these two? Yep, works great!
If you wish? Use the solid state. :-) I'd like to try an I-timer just to see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 08:18 am:

Grant, I knew nothing about a T when mine found me. Nothing you cant figure out between the manuels and this forum. Any questions I have had were answered here. I have nobody close to help but my forum mentors are always close. All stock parts are working well for me. People are amazed when you tell them it has no oil,water or fuel pump. I drive it as much as possible and the only time I had a problem was running out of gas one time. No problem really with my fuel can in the back. Main thing to do with a T is have fun with it.
Drive safe and often!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grant J Barlow on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 10:53 am:

I am a big fan of videos on YouTube. Watched one on testing the coils (made in Australia, of all places).
Found and purchased a coil tester. Once some of the snow goes so I can get to my barn, I will start working to get it running.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 11:31 am:

Grant

Great you are following all the available on-line info and today's forum help. Decades ago this info was not available, so I used Ford Manual, and magazine hints that came with club magazines.

Never had much trouble following the company manual, stuck with Ford parts too. The Model T is very forgiving of the novice home garage mechanic!

As for coils, years ago tried to do them myself, but didn't have the right tools, or today's modern tool to set and adjust coils. When you have your 4 trembler coils done right, the result is amazing to the running of a stock T.

I find the work of specialist to the hobby as the best way to get a set of matched coils for my Fords.



Coil Rebuilding
Wood Top...............................$40.00
Brass Top Mill Finish.................$50.00
Brass Top Black Finish................$50.00
Early KW (1912)..............................$75.00
Normal WOOD TOP COIL
turnaround time of 10-14 days



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grant J Barlow on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 12:19 pm:

The person I purchased the truck from told me the coils were rebuilt, probably around 2003-4 and he never got around to putting them in the car. He also said the bendix needs rebuilding as the starter would just spin.

So with the coils (black plastic(?)) I read/saw that they need to be lubricated. Would that be the pivot points (not the points themselves) get oiled occasionally?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble Northern Michigan on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 01:23 pm:

No the coils are electrical with vibrating point, nothing to oil. The timer however, is mechanical and needs to be oiled. The coils go in a
box on the firewall, the timer or also called a commutator is in the front of the engine above and to the right of the fan pulley. You should be able to follow the wires from the firewall to the timer to find it. The ford service manual has everything, the operators manual is just basic general user information of how to drive. You should get both to get up to speed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, February 10, 2018 - 08:12 pm:

The timer (commutator) comes in several types. Ford used roller types originally, however "brush" types were made by many companies for after-market use. And "flapper" types, as well as several that are sort of a cross between brush and flapper types were also quite common.
Most roller type timers require good lubrication, and will wear out very quickly if run without proper oiling (or some type of grease). Most (not all) brush type timers should be run without oil or grease of any quantity. Flapper types (as well as many of the off-beat combination ideas) need some small amount of oil or grease. However, exactly how much oil, or what type of grease is best, varies from one flapper type to the next.
Just clarifying the point about model T ignition and the need for oiling.

I, too, prefer model Ts kept mostly era correct. That can and does include various types of era correct timers. As for any of the several modern ideas? I don't like to say much against them. Some of them are good. They can work well, and a lot of people like using them.
I know that a properly repaired and maintained original system will work as well or better, and be as reliable or better, as any modern ignition idea for the model T. It is my opinion, that antique automobiles are better served to be kept close to era correct, and, generally speaking, the closer, the better. But some of those modern ideas do serve other people well. And that, in turn, helps keep more antique automobiles on the road. Our antiques are best served, being seen, driven, and enjoyed. If any of the several modern ideas helps that happen? They can't be all bad.


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