How to paint your "T" for $3.35!!!!!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: How to paint your "T" for $3.35!!!!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Stubenvoll on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 09:55 am:

Found this through Hemming's, it was originally an ad in Sears and Roebuck's Fall and Winter 1924-1925 catalog. I think we've all seen cars "restored" this way LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:01 am:

That is so funny to paint a car with a brush BUT I must say that many years ago as I walked through a shopping plaza parking lot I saw a Ford station wagon painted with maroon paint and the brush strokes were visible from 20 feet away so I had to go take a closer look only to discover that the black accent stripe on the side of the car was 3/4" electrical tape!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:14 am:

Hi Dave,

Yes, I am sure that more than a few of us have seen cars which appear to have been painted with a broom.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:16 am:

I hope Rich Eagle will post to this thread. I believe he has painted his restorations with a brush for many years -


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:26 am:

Several years back there was a young T owner who had a tudor sedan. He posted here about painting his T with a brush application system to the never ending negative posts from other forum users. No, he no longer posts here (gee, I don't know why??? ) but from the photos he posted, it wasn't bad looking at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:34 am:

When I lived in Connecticut, there was a guy that used to bring a 1970 Dodge Challenger to the local car shows. He said he had painted his engine, including the valve covers, with POR 15 applied with a brush. The finish, even on the smooth steel valve covers, was flawless. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:39 am:

The common impression is that any monkey with a brush can apply paint. 'Taint so. Surface prep, knowledge of the handling character of the materials a skillful hand and final detailing will produce results that are often much better in quality than a "spray job". High finishes on vehicles and fine furniture were commonplace centuries before the invention of spray painting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:49 am:

My dad painted the old 1954 Plymouth with a brush. This was in its final years when it was serious decline. I wish I had taken some pictures. Eventually he gave up on it and bought a new 1973 Duster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 11:05 am:

When I was young my grandad gave my dad a 1947 chevy pickup with a studibaker box. The cab was green with horrible faded red (pink) paint bleeding through the bed was blue. He painted the truck balck and the top of the cab was white. He used house paint and a brush. Looked good at 25 mph.
It sat in the woods for 30 years or more after he stopped using it to haul wood. He gave it to me but it was rusted beyond belief. That paint never flaked off and you couldnt sand it off. You cant buy house paint now that would be so tough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Elliott on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 11:06 am:

I and a buddy painted his 1940 Chev couple with a bug sprayer back in out high school days before we had any money. It didn't come out too bad, not a lot of gloss to it. It was a lot of work as the can didn't hold a lot of paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 11:22 am:

Yes, Ancient Astronaut Theorist call the method of painting with a brush "Coach Painting. "

As younger and younger members acquire a Model T, they miss some historical lessons. Up until the late 1920's the bodies for a Model T were constructed of wood framing, most likely constructed by apprentices from horse drawn carriage shops.

As companies such as Budd and Fisher perfected the pressed steel bodies, old coach building techniques - hand painting with a brush - was the norm.

OT - think about the process of wood gaining an automobile dash. Why use painting and a comb to have a wood appearing dash when you have a selection of real wood to produce a dash board?

Yep them there astronaut theorist know...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 11:39 am:

A fellow said he used a "Hudson sprayer" to paint cars. It was a bug or plant sprayer as Thomas mentioned.
As Rich B. mentioned I do use a brush to paint parts with. I painted an entire Model A with nitrocellulose lacquer using a 1" watercolor brush in 1969. That was a poor choice for many reasons but was presentable enough for car daily driver that lived outdoors.
Using a soft brush with Dulux or tractor paint has been worked very well. The slow drying flows out the few brush marks and even coats can be applied on irregular parts that where spraying can't reach evenly. There is no over spray and the fumes of these enamels are pretty tame compared with modern production paints.
I do spray larger surfaces such as fenders and body panels. The brush can give good results for chassis parts, wheels, windshield frames etc. My '14 touring doesn't require a good paint job so the brush works great on that body.
I don't advocate it for every one but it can be mastered for those who want to try.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john pawlowski - NE Pennsylvania on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 12:45 pm:

Earl Schieb, I'll paint any car for $19.95.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 01:01 pm:

I guess we've gotten use to liking the paint on restored cars to have the 'plastic' look and anything any different isn't as good.
I believe that if we could go back in time when Model T's were rolling off the assembly lines those of us who are purists and perfectionists would have a rude awakening to what the cars really looked liked. Yes the pictures and early films showing the cars rolling off the line give us some idea but in reality they would look different as to what we would be use to today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 01:34 pm:

Motor Age 1922 July 1

Painting your car


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carey on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 01:48 pm:

When I was a teenager back about 1961 I "restored" a 56 ford wagon for a neighbor. Bondo over newspaper above the headlights. Painted with Dulux and a brush. No brush marks
and he was very happy for a work car.
My own first car was painted by Earl Schieb for 19.95 also looked good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 01:50 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 01:58 pm:

Parts of my little truck are painted with a brush. Weren't T bodies painted on the assembly line with what was more or less a sprinkler?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Bocchi on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 06:10 pm:

In the mid-fifties I was a kid of 6 or 7. My dad called me out to the yard and we watched the neighbor paint an old forties car with a roller. Much to our surprise, When it was done it looked pretty good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 06:26 pm:

Fords up to about 1914 were painted with a brush. After that they were touched up with a brass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 06:27 pm:

that is not brass, but a brush/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 06:43 pm:

This post made me think of the 49
Plymouth a friend of mine painted John Deere green. It was his first car he had bought. He had painted it a with brush.
It was in 1960 and another friends older brother
bought a 40 Ford 4dr he had just polished.
It was quite a contrast as the deeply polished black 40 Ford sat next to the JD green 49 Plymouth!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:33 pm:

I don't recall the stories title but I remember reading a Model Garage story with Gus Wilson years back where gus paints his "Roadster" with a brush. Quite detailed as I recall. This was before the stories became Gus solving an odd problem every month and more about actual mechanical/cosmetic automotive stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:46 pm:

As Rich Bingham points out a brush painted surface can be better than one which was sprayed.

When I started in the car painting trade brush painting was part of the training.

Our rail carriages were all brushed especially inside as it saved masking, overspray and excessive solvent fumes.

Done correctly the surface is a glass finish no brush marks can be seen, I painted my first T at college using a brush supplied by the teacher who did his time in the railway yards.

When finished it had one small brush mark on the back of the front seat.

Several times I was called out at car shows for having a 1911 T with a spray paint job, I used the run on the seat to put the so called judges in their place.

If you ever get close enough to a well restored vehicle such as the British queens carriages you will see the surface is perfect.

Buffing and polishing are not usually able to be done on the material used it flows out and dries brush marks free.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 11:18 pm:

What on Earth is Substitute Turpentine?
You get a whole quart of it with the 30T1699 outfit.
Cool ad. Thanks Dave! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 08:06 am:

There was a used car dealer in town that would take a wet lace curtain and stick it to a car, and when it dried he sprayed it with a Buick air conditional compressor, pull the curtain off it left the design of the curtain on the car. he made a living doing that


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 10:07 am:

Duey, that would be mineral spirits. This from a time when all paint was generally thinned with turps. Looking to forestall complaints she. He thinner doesn't smell like a pine forest, probably.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 10:19 am:

Eugene, back in 1970 I lace painted my 67 VW deluxe bus. Was pretty darn slick looking


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 10:55 am:

"she. He". Should read ". . . that the thinner . . ."

I would like to strangle "auto correct ". Grrrrrr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Conwill on Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 12:53 pm:

I would reply here, but seeing as how I wrote the original post, it might be better to just post the link?

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2018/02/13/automobilia-gow-paint-your-flivver/


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