Changing Exhaust Pipe/Muffler on my '24 Touring

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Changing Exhaust Pipe/Muffler on my '24 Touring
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Emering on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 04:41 pm:

Got a new exhaust pipe, brass pack nut, and steel muffler from Lang's.
Any advice on disassembling the old exhaust and installing the new?
Should the new pack nut thread on dry or be sprayed/greased with something first?

You might tell that I am a new T owner and have no mechanical ability by my questions.

Gene


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 05:24 pm:

Gene, I personally like to use some hi-temp anti-seize on the manifold and nut threads. Sometimes on an old original manifold it can be tricky to get the nut started. Take your time.

While not totally necessary, it is nice to have a pack nut wrench. I found mine used. You might be able to get used ones from vendors. Good tool to have even though it is the only thing you'll use it for.

You may have to retighten after a run or two---but don't over tighten, as you can break the end of the manifold off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Emering on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 06:31 pm:

Chad,

Anything special to do, if the old nut is hard to remove? Don't want to damage the manifold taking the old exhaust either.

Gene


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 06:35 pm:

If it has been on there awhile, run some PB Blaster on the threads and work the nut back and forth a little at a time until it comes off. That way you won't mess the threads up.

I bought a thread die to clean up the manifold threads, but again, most people won't go to that expense.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 06:51 pm:

Gene, Some tail pipes are not bent correct and once connected on the manifold on one end and to the muffler on the other end, the flange on the manifold and flair on the tail pipe do not mate squarely/equally all the way around. Get the manifold mounted correctly on the block. Then with the help of someone under the T holding the tail pipe and muffler at the correct place see if the manifold to tail pipe connection is squared up. If not the nut will go on too hard, not far enough, and you may end up with a exhaust leak at the joint. I have had to bend three different tail pipes to make them fit correctly on three different Model T's. This all assumes the manifold is straight and flat to the block.
PS- I am probably the only knuckle head who does this but once installed correctly, if I have to later on take off the exhaust manifold, I take it off with the tail pipe still attached as one piece. It takes some manuvering to get it all out and then back in but relieves me of dealing with the packing nut upon re-assembly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Emering on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 08:18 pm:

Mike,

Did you have to heat the exhaust pipe to bend it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 08:49 pm:

No, The pipes needed just the slightest bending so I used a tree in the yard with a sharp forked branch to wedge the pipes in and just manually pulled a tiny bit. I assume a tail pipe that needed a lot of bending would need a professional bending unit so the curve would not start to collapse. I know my method sounds comical but is probably pretty close to what was done in rural areas during the Model T era.
PS- Someone used to sell a S.S. MODEL T pipe that folks claim was spot on with the bends. Maybe someone with a better memory than I will chime in with the info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 08:50 pm:

Once you get everything aligned, one of these can be useful to keep the pack nut from backing off. http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/pack-nut-locker


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Emering on Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 08:52 pm:

Thank you for the great advice.
I will proceed slowly and carefully.

Gene


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 06:30 am:

Gene, Michael's advice is sound. The pipe must fit the manifold flange neatly. Do not be tempted to try to pull things into line with the packnut. An exhaust pipe under tension is a sure way to put a bend in an otherwise sound manifold.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 10:51 am:

The best way to remove the old nut is to run the car until it reaches operating temperature, shut if off, and then use the Ford packing nut wrench to immediately back it off. The manifold and the nut will cool at different rates which is why itíll be easier.

I would try this before spraying any chemical lubricants.

If you use the original Ford packing nut wrench to tighten it, you will not need any additional help from clamps or locking mechanisms. This a time when you should use the right tool for the job.

As others have said, they are now available from the major parts vendors if you do not want to pay up for an original.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 11:01 am:

Please be aware, the exhaust pipes currently available are not authentic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 10:06 pm:

Michael, your bending method isn't comical at all. :-)
If I need to bend something, I walk around my motor grader until I find the right spot. My trees are too tall.
A tree would be nicer to an exhaust pipe since the tree is softer and also rounded.
Larry, would you elaborate a bit? Are the issues in the flange or the bend?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 11:58 pm:

The original 1924 exhaust pipe was part of the muffler itself. There was no small shell like in the earlier models. The exhaust pipe is 12" longer than the earlier pipes. This was another one of Fords cost cutting measures, which worked out very well, except no one today makes them. I ran 50 of them two years ago, and they all sold in 24 hours. I don't have the finances to make them exactly like Ford did, even though my method worked out ok. I have been successful in finding good used originals for my use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 12:17 am:

I use Graphite on the pack nut/exhaust manifold end. Snug it up ,start car let it warm up for 5 mins and snug a little more while hot. When cool use a hose clamp to keep it from backing off by itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 12:43 am:

Aha! Makes sense to me Larry.
Perhaps why a notion of a modern complaint of loud exhaust (repro items) exists in my head. ???
Keep us updated if you would Gene. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 01:17 am:

Larry, sounds like you may need to start thinking about making another run of them. :-) As I recall, your original source is no longer available, but surely someone else could be found. Sure seems to me there would still be a demand. Sure glad I got mine when I did. :-) Dave


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