My new 1915 Speedster... opinions please?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: My new 1915 Speedster... opinions please?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 12:18 am:

Hi guys:

I have a 1922-23 T Touring car and wanted something a bit more fun and different... so I just got this 1915 Speedster. The car is in Queretaro, Mexico.

It was built by a friend of mine about 20-25 years ago. He got a 1915 chassis with some parts (among them a real short running board, so he thinks it might have been a Speedster).
He got a Speedster body kit, made new wood himself (he didn't like the one in the kit) and finished it in white (which I don't like) with white tires, and wood wheel with red rims. He says he did it like a candy... but I have to confess I don't really like much the looks of it as it stands.

On the mechanical side, he installed a 1921 engine with starter on which he raised compression and did some internal tweaks for better oiling and greater horsepower, installed bearings in axles and I really don't know what else... but the thing is that the car rides really great. In fact, just a couple of years ago he did an old car rally, some 900 miles on it, and last year he did a tour on Baja of about the same distance with it.

Compared to my 1923, this 1915 is a blast to drive and I am very happy with it.

I intend to install blackwalls (needs new tires badly) and paint the wheels in cherry red (darker than the current one, to match the leather, and this time painting the wood over) and eventually, but not soon, I want to paint it in full red.

But in the meantime, I want to get it to be a fully correct looking 1915 T, and for that I need some advise and therefore I want to ask a few things, hoping some of you may be able to help.

The car, as mentioned, is a 1915, and from what I read I believe it is somewhat correct (and I do know Ford did not sell Speedsters, but I mean or intend to have the car with most 1915 correct parts)... so far it does have the brass radiator with Made in USA, electric lights with brass rings

But my main doubts are:

1. Taillight looks correct but has painted bezel. Do I need to get one with brass bezel?(or it is possible to have the current one brass plated?)

2. Sidelights would seem older but I prefer to check with the experts... and in case not and somebody has some 1915 correct ones, let me know please.

3. Light switch, my friend told me is not correct, but I see Snyders sells a correct one.

So... here are a few pics. Please feel free to tell me, asides from the above, whatever you see is "not correct" for 1915, so I can search for the correct parts.

Thanks!

Victor


1915 Speedster, 1


1915 Speedster, 2


1915 Speedster, 3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 12:32 am:

And a few more...

1915 Speedster, 4


1915 Speedster, 5


1915 Speedster, 6


1915 Speedster, 7


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 12:46 am:

And just a few more...

1915 Speedster, 7


1915 Speedster, 8


1915 Speedster, 9


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 12:53 am:

And finally, the incorrectly painted engine...

1915 Speedster, 10


1915 Speedster, 11


1915 Speedster, 12


1915 Speedster, 13


1915 Speedster, 14



And that's it for now. Any criticism and observations will be appreciated!, particularly since I want to correct anything wrong.

Thanks!
Victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 12:57 am:

Side lamps are not correct, too early, can't tell about the tail light but it's at least close. Need pictures of the control levers without the covers, frame, pinion spool and front end details. Rear end is later. Similar design, but a '15 did not have the reinforcement ribs at the brake backing plates. It looks like a fun car. You can add a lot of '15 part and make the undercarriage close, but it will still be a speedster, not a factory body. You need to decide if you really want to put the money into that or just enjoy the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 01:56 am:

It's a speedster, there are no incorrect colors! Like! :-) Looks like a fun car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 02:03 am:

Please don't take this wrong, but so far I don't see anything on it that's '15.

Just enjoy the car, it looks like a nice one!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 08:21 am:

I'd just drive the tires off it as is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 08:47 am:

does it come with this starter?

Sorry I just could not resist... the devil made me do it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 08:47 am:

It most likely has reproduction 1911 Torpedo Roadster sheet metal on it. There is nothing wrong with that.
It is a speedster, there are no set fast rules so you can do whatever you want with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 08:55 am:

Victor -- The body looks like a Rootlieb Speedster kit, so it's not any particular year. I see lots more '14 parts than '15. It would be less trouble to call it a '14 than to change it to a '15. As Mark G. alluded, you can do anything on a Speedster and it's not wrong. Later parts were part of the game, so I too would recommend that you enjoy it as is. Engine has a generator and two valve covers, so it's '19 - '23. Rear end is later than '15. Tail lamp is '17 or later. Wheels are '19 or later. But all that's OK since it's a Speedster, so have fun with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 09:13 am:

I would deal with the worn tires and drive it. You could spend a fortune and it is still going to be a speedster that will have something somewhere that is not exact 15. Have fun with it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Horton, Utah on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 09:24 am:

When I first brought this thread up, I had to catch my breath. A couple of years or so ago, there was a white speedster very similar to this one that came up for sale. It was located somewhere in Kentucky or thereabouts and the asking price was 16K. The local gendarmes apparently clocked the car and declared it cable of “death defying speeds” Because of my advanced age and the distance involved I simply dreamed about it and how good I would look driving it. I’ve often wondered where the car is now and hope it does not come up for sale in the classified again where I can see it. Your car has fired up my thoughts on the matter again. I would leave it exactly as it is, including and especially the bordello red leather upholstery!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Hamlin on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 09:38 am:

I love the white & red.
Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 09:56 am:

Speedsters are custom cars by definition. Everyone who made one, made a bitsa, and every bitsa used different bits. For one thing, your car has demountable rims and an inflated spare. Changing that back to '15 specs will be expensive, and a much bigger pain in the wazoo if you ever have a flat. You have a great-looking car that's typical of the era. Paint it whatever color turns you on, drive the bejabbers out of it, and don't apologize to purists. You'll have a blast!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren F Rollins on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 10:13 am:

Have fun with it . It is a nice car. Drive and enjoy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 10:40 am:

I agree with the idea of painting the wheels. "Natural" spokes on a car of that era are a modern fad. But this is a speedster, and made of parts from different years, so trying to change them all to a particular "correct" year would be expensive. In addition to the parts Mike Walker mentioned, the carburetor and steering wheel (non-T) would have to change. We haven't seen the springs, shackles, pedals, and other items which also may be "wrong". I'd forget about trying to make this car correct, paint it as you like, and enjoy it. If you want a correct 1915 Ford, that's a perfectly legitimate and worthy goal. But for that I would start with an actual 1915 touring, runabout, or other car made in the Ford factory, and research the reference books to find out what it may need.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 10:47 am:

I forgot to ask, did that car drive all the way to Quintana Roo and Baja? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 12:08 pm:

Hi guys.

Thank you all for your comments. None offense taken... quite the opposite, I have learned a few things, among them, that my best choice is to leave it as is.

Perhaps I will only try to find the 1915 brass bezel cowl lights, so it will be a bit more in tune with the 1915 headlights.

As for Steve question, no, it was trailered there, but then ran about 900 miles in the Quintana Roo "Rally Maya" which by the way is a great experience, and a bit less on Baja. As I told my friend, he deserved an applause for his feat, but his wife deserves a monument! Doing all of that mileage on a T with no roof... not for me certainly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 01:00 pm:

My long Baja drive was in 1970, when the pavement ended at El Rosario.


The drive to Bahia de los Angeles was a wonderful adventure. I'd like to do a trip like that by Model T, but I can't do it there. The roads are paved now, and compared to then the place is crawling with tourists.


We camped on the beach for a week, and during that week we saw just one other car when some local guys came out to fish.

Sorry for the drift. Old people like to reminisce.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 01:05 pm:

It was a fine machine when it left the factory and is a delightful fun car now. We all change as time goes on. I'm sure whatever you do with it will be just right for someone. It is enjoyable for me just to see it.
Thanks
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 01:08 pm:

I wouldn't waste time, energy or money on making "corrections" to a fantasy vehicle.

However, if you are going to make any corrections, please do the following.

Replace any phillips head screws with slotted screws (I see some on the sidelight brackets).

The round lens of the sidelights should face forward, regardless of what car on which they are mounted. You should either bend the brackets 90 degrees so the spades are the correct orientation, or purchase a set of brackets with the correct orientation. Also be aware that because your side lamps are mounted incorrectly due to the brackets, that the left lamp is currently on the right side and the right lamp is currently on the left side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 03:07 pm:

I think it is a great looking car and wouldn't do anything except maintenance. The guy did a great job on the car and it could go on from there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Lyon, PDX, OR. on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 04:08 pm:

When you paint it red (I wouldn't) leave the ends of the gas tank the way they are, you don't want to paint over the info on them. That is one darn nice car, the quality really shows, Don.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 04:50 pm:

That is a beautiful speedster just the way it is, and since Ford did not make a speedster, all speedsters are custom cars, so nothing is needed to make it look "correct". If it were mine I would concentrate on the mechanical aspects to make it as reliable as possible and leave the body as it is. I would not paint it until the paint wears out and needs repainting.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 05:10 pm:

When talking about a speedster, one need bear in mind it's a "custom-job." -Customizing cars not only made guys like George Barris and Ed Roth a great big pile of money, they had a lot of fun doing it. -And that's what it's about: fun. -Custom-jobs can be as whimsical as the Monkee-mobile, as downright silly as the Munster-Coach, as gorgeously slick as the Batmobile, or as dark and evil as "The Car." -Fun. -It's what makes life worth living. -As Sheldon Cooper once said, "What's life without whimsey?"

A custom-job is like a piece of music in that it's about how it makes you feel. -The thing that makes it either good or bad is the quality of its execution; in other words, neatness. -Everyone knows what a good paint job looks like, what good pin-striping looks like, what a neatly routed electric harness looks like. -Sloppy welds, sloppy upholstery, sloppy engineering, sloppy anything is what detracts points from a custom-job.

I enjoy the custom-jobs for what they are; pieces of creative, rolling sculpture with lots of room for artistic license. -I think this one looks especially nice and I bet it would be a blast to drive. -But hey, that's just my humble opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 05:13 pm:

I agree. That is a great speedster that you will enjoy for years to come. There is nothing more fun to drive than a T speedster and that car will draw a crowd no matter where it is parked. Congratulations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 05:24 pm:

Probably the easiest way to add the bling of brass headlamp rims is to buy a pair of new ones from the suppliers. Sure, they’re chrome or nickel plated but that can be stripped down to the metal they’re made of - brass..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 05:34 pm:

Thank you guys! I appreciate all of the possitive remarks.

I have a question regarding the brass trim:

I understand the car should use slot screws, not phillips, as Erik correctly pointed out. Question here is if it is flat slotted screws, or the domed slotted screws (oval head?). What was used in the era?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 07:48 pm:

Both. "oval-head" slotted screws cost more than "flat-head" slotted screws. Even more so then than now. Generally speaking, flat-head were used mostly in places where they were not meant to be seen, under furniture, sub-structures of cars and other things, especially in places where they would be hidden by upholstery. Oval-head screws were mostly used where there was some reason to want a more finished appearance on the finished product.
Note, there are of course many exceptions to that general rule.
On those side-lamp brackets specifically? It gets a little more confusing. Offhand, I don't recall exactly what year the change was made. But only the first couple years of model Ts used screws actually. 1909/'10 ('11 I don't know?) used screws, and they were oval-head. After that, until the end of that style lamp and bracket they used what we would tend to call carriage bolts.
In the for what it is worth details department? It is generally thought that that style of lamp and bracket ended with the 1914 model Year. That, however, is not entirely correct. In the first place, the 1914 style continued in production well into the 1915 model/fiscal years because of production delays caused by the new 1915 bodies. The new style open cars started slowly leaving the factory in December of '14. And the 1914 style continued to be built at least until April of 1915 before the new style could be built fast enough to keep up with production. Also, a little less known, some of the bare chassis were sold in the brass radiator/flat firewall style until early '17. These were usually used for things like delivery trucks, but also were available for speedsters and custom body use as well. So, your "'15" is not necessarily wrong with them. However, carriage bolts would be more correct.

Good looking speedster! Enjoy it. (But not a "true" '15 as others have said.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 07:53 pm:

Mike, I believe you are right. I just checked their website and yes, I think it is a Rootlieb Speedster kit. Personally, I love the design!

Thanks for pointing it out!

Victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 07:56 pm:

Steve, thanks for the pics of your Baja trip. It must have been a real adventure!
My favorite trip - nature wise - has been there also, but by sea, on the inside of the peninsula, which is called the Sea of Cortez. Jacques Custoe called it the "Aquarium of the World". It is really fabulous.

Back to T's...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 07:59 pm:

Any suggestions as to where can I find a monocle windshield?... I mean the circular windshield held by the steering column.

Thanks,
victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 08:37 pm:

These folks have them for sale:
https://www.modeltford.com/item/NO.830.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 09:27 pm:

It's worth noting that a lot of vendors only sell the monocle windshield frame/bracket. You'll still have to get a local glass shop to do the glass. I know the link that Richard posted says so, but it seems no matter how big they make that warning there's always someone who feels blindsided by it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Macleod on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 10:17 pm:

I really like this car. My only argument is color. If it was my car (and I intend to own one like this one day) I would paint it yellow with running gear, chassis and wheels painted to match that beautiful upholstery. Get some black nonSkid tires on it and run it into the ground. Great, great car you have there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 11:27 pm:

I have heard that, while monocle windshields are fine for the driver, they increase the turbulence of the wind blasting the passenger. I have no personal experience to confirm or deny this. But here's a thought: Several years ago I got to ride in a Pierce-Arrow speedster with no windshield at all. The driver had a leather flying helmet and goggles like the sets pilots used in WWI, and he provided one for the passenger (me!) They were very effective and they didn't restrict visibility. We were doing over 60 with no discomfort. I should say no PHYSICAL discomfort; I was non-trivially nervous going that fast with two-wheel brakes!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, February 19, 2018 - 11:28 pm:

Hi V.Milke,

I concur with many of the opinions posted above: Repaint the car to suit you and drive it as is. Have a blast!

The steering wheel looks much like a Bauer "Fat Man" tilting aftermarket wheel intended for Model Ts.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 02:08 am:

Beautiful, beautiful speedster! Personally, I'd sure leave the white! First, not only is it beautiful, but to repaint the car to a degree of quality anywhere near what now exists, you'd have to take the whole car apart, because so much of the chassis and running gear is also white. And second, you'd loose all of that beautiful pin striping that was also beautifully and expertly done (even on running gear) whether it's tape or paint, it's gorgeous! I really like the contrast between the white and those absolutely "ELEGANT" real leather seats, which by the way, is what makes the color of the pin striping so perfect. If I were to make any change at all, I'd consider the very expensive addition of period wire wheels as they look so good on any speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 02:13 am:

Beautiful, beautiful speedster! Personally, I'd sure leave the white! First, not only is it beautiful, but to repaint the car to a degree of quality anywhere near what now exists, you'd have to take the whole car apart, because so much of the chassis and running gear is also white. And second, you'd loose all of that beautiful pin striping that was also beautifully and expertly done (even on running gear) whether it's tape or paint, it's gorgeous! I really like the contrast between the white and those absolutely "ELEGANT" real leather seats, which by the way, is what makes the color of the pin striping so perfect. If I were to make any change at all, I'd consider the very expensive addition of period wire wheels as they look so good on any speedster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 02:16 am:

Oops! Did it again! Darn double post! Going back & forth between text and photos to study the details of the speedster, caused a bit of confusion in my ever-aging brain,.....sorry,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 02:36 am:

Wayne Sheldon - You mentioned the oval head screws.....

You, and I'm sure many skilled carpenters on the forum here would know more about this than me, but if I may, I'd like to comment a bit further on my feelings about oval head screws:

My Dad was certainly not a professional, but as a self-taught carpenter, he certainly built some beautiful things and did some very nice work. One thing he did quite often, was that he used oval head screws a lot because he thought they added a certain look of "professionalism" to his work, especially when used with one other little favorite trick he had. I'm not sure if this is the proper name, but Dad like to use what he called "finishing washers" in conjunction with oval head screws. Especially brass or stainless steel screws and finishing washers. This combination not only adds a nice finished look, but in an application whereby a wooden component might need to be temporarily removed for some reason (like seats in a boat for instance) finishing washers have a very practical advantage. They spread the downward pressure from the screw head over a larger area and also provide a large metal-to-metal "bearing surface" between screw head and finishing washer, so as not to crush the wood around the screw head from periodic tightening/removal/replacement, which prevents the otherwise gradual sinking of the screw head deeper into the wood over time. Anyway, it's something that I always thought was just "good practice" in the right application,.... FWIW,.... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 02:44 am:

Cup Washers. Yes, they look nice in certain applications.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 05:02 am:

Yes, those cup washers do have both practical and aesthetic purposes in many applications. I often see them on original tops and upholstery kick panels in antique cars (mostly on non-Fords). Coupled with oval head screws, they give a finer finished look.

(And don't worry about the double posts! They may be annoying to you (as they are to me a few times I have managed to do that), but they don't really hurt anything.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 11:59 am:

Bill, thank you for posting the pictures of the Bauer Fat Man steering wheel. I guess it is exactly the same one I have... though mine probably lost it's plate long ago and was painted.

Curious... I can understand the "fat man" had an easier time getting in or out with the tilting steering wheel, but when it is back into normal position, the wheel is bigger than the regular T's, therefore a big buy would have a tougher time driving... or give himself constant massage at the belly...

Thanks again! Your pic made me thought if I do want it painted or better have it not painted and just polished.

victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 12:02 pm:

Wayne, thanks!

Your "In the for what it is worth details department?" made me laugh. Yes... interesting details that most people would never know or care for... but I do and I appreciate it.

I will get oval screws for all the brass trim and find carriage bolts for the lamps.

Thanks again!
Victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 12:14 pm:

Gilbert, thanks!

As for your "I have heard that, while monocle windshields are fine for the driver, they increase the turbulence of the wind blasting the passenger" comment, I am sure you are absolutely right!

In fact, my friend says he never considered adding it due to respect for his passenger!

But as far as "looks" go, they can't be beaten!, at least, in my book.

I don't really like much the ones I have seen for sale so far... I will keep my eyes open for one, hoping an old one surfaces.

Thanks again,
victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 - 12:59 pm:

A cambridge windscreen gives some protection to both the driver and passenger. Some people like the look and others hate it. The faster you go the more effective they are but in your average Model T it's never fast enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C-west central, MN on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 01:21 am:

Gorgeous speedster! Thanks for showing!
Not to argue but bare spokes could be had at the dealer way back when too if one wanted. IF I have my head on square.
Just to rib/poke the dead horse bit a little Steve. :-) Haha! You say tomato and I say tomato. Let's call the........ ;-)
Keep us updated Victor!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 03:56 pm:

Thanks for the kind words!

No idea what a cambridge windscreen... I googled it but I guess I am not smart enough as all i could find is tons of links selling or doing windshield repairs in Cambridge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 03:58 pm:

Bauer Tilt wheel plates?

Anybody knows if there are any plates for sale for the BAUER tilt wheel, like in the pic Bill Harper posted above? it turns out mine has the holes for the rivets, so I need it.

I already ordered the oval slotted head wood screws to change them to improve the car a bit.

Thanks!
Victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Friday, March 16, 2018 - 09:06 pm:

Hi guys:

Very little progress to report... but the car has seen some use and enjoyment!

I have been working at getting the missing parts, completing it's tool set, etc.

Again with the same question: Are there any reproductions of the BAUER plate?

Thanks!
Victor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 02:49 am:

Glad to hear that you are enjoying the T speedster! It looks good and should often be seen running along the road where it belongs.

The problem with something like the Bauer steering wheel is that it is one of literally hundreds of after market accessories made for the model T (and other cars of the model T era). Over the years in this hobby, along with the standard Ford plates needed for restoration, a few accessory name plates do get reproduced. The Ruckstell rear axle, Hassler shocks and maybe a dozen others are sometimes available from the regular parts suppliers. Occasionally, someone will make a small run of a few others. But the dozen or so that may be available are very few against the hundreds that have never been reproduced.
An area I am not that comfortable with, I understand that there are computer programs that can be used to recreate plates and decals from photos. Some people have known sports shops with the capability to reproduce such plates in small numbers from such programs (even singles). And if you happen to have such contacts, larger small numbers can be made to order from companies in China if one would like to go that route. (I personally don't have such contacts, although I think a few people on this forum may have them?)

The Bauer is common enough that a few people may be interested in a replacement plate. However, the fact is that most good original Bauer wheels still have their original plate in nice enough condition that new ones are not generally needed. Occasionally, damaged wheels with good plates can be found, or even a loose plate could show up at a swap meet or even ebay. But that is somewhat of a long-shot.

A computer generated decal could be made and placed onto a piece of metal, riveted into place and would look good to all but the few really familiar with the Bauer wheels made especially for model Ts. Just an idea I would consider. I did some similar reconstruction of original details for several parts of a non-Ford I was restoring many years ago. I also one time made a plate from a piece of scrap aluminum, used a letter stamp set to carefully line up and hand/hammer stamp the name and a little information onto the plate. Once installed? It looked good.

There used to be a few small companies that would make such plates for the antique car hobby. I haven't seen any such ads for a few years now, and haven't needed such a service. Maybe someone else on here may know if one is still in business?

Good luck and have fun!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.Milke on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 - 09:33 pm:

Wayne,

Thanks a lot! I will look into a plate expert and see if with a good picture and his computer program he can get one done.

By the way, I really didn't get the real usefulness of the Bauer steering wheel until today that I taught an older (and quite big) friend how to drive it. Having the Bauer was helpful for him to get in and out the driver's seat.

Thanks again,
Victor


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