Wood bands

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Wood bands
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mosher on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:14 am:

I did the google mtfca search, and there wasn’t to much info on wood bands. There’s a lot info about cotton and Kevlar. I’m a fairly new t driver,and the t that I purchased a year ago came with kevlar well to make a long story short I couldn’t find a good neutral. So after many attempts to adjust the bands and the linkage I think I turned my transmission into a pile of junk. The reverse and low drum are in pieces. So I was looking for what the mtfca has to say about the durability of wood. I live in a area that’s busy with cars, traffic lights, stop signs and hills. So my low band is used a lot


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:39 am:

Try; mtfca; wood bands
There should be pages of info. There will be some that might not look like they contain people talking about the wood bands, but they do. If you are trying to use the reverse as a brake, don't, there are a lot of discussions on that. The reverse drum is the weakest in the link. Could be that you are not clamping down on the band and are allowing it to slip, which creates heat that leads to breakage or are getting them too tight or the drums were cracked to start with.
When the low band is used you HAVE to keep the pedal pressed down tight to keep the low drum from turning. If you are trying to go too fast in low, the drum is trying to spin even if the band is clamped down tight. I am not knocking wood or kevlar, but I would suggest using cotton bands till you get a little more drive time. They are more forgiving for a novice driver. I would also suggest outside brakes and Ruckstell or other transmission that give you and inbetween gear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:46 am:

You will find a lot of different opinions on wood bands. I have been running wood bands for years and I love them. They ware very slow and need little to no adjustment after initial setting. I live in the city and see a lot of stop and go. I have not experienced any chatter that I was warned about by some folks and they do not tear up the drums. Give them a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:55 am:

Preferences for band linings are like the opinions on oil, many have their favorite. Kevlar is blamed by some for the failure of transmission drums, others swear by it. Incorrect adjustment and/or driving technique has been pointed to as a reason for bad results with Kevlar.

As with all types, there are those who sing the praises of wood linings while others (myself included) don't care for the "feel" they give. They can chatter, but again that could be an adjustment/technique issue. I'd say they are impressive for wear, and of course there's no lint. When I got my T there was about 10,000 miles on its wood bands. They were operating, but at the end of the trail, and causing little log-jams of splinters in the oil change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 11:35 am:

My opinion;
Kevlar is quite “unforgiving “ of poor adjustment and driving techniques in regards to the life of reverse drums and to a lesser extent of the low drum.
Kevlar seems to work quite well on the brake drum

Wood works well for the brake and reverse, but so does cotton
Wood is less “friendly “ to install and remove

My preference;
Kevlar for the brake. Wood or cotton for the low and reverse.

Driving technique;
Pump the brake pedal is preferred
Avoid slipping the low and reverse is preferred
Rev up in low pedal and “dump “ it into high gear while quickly closing the throttle and then reopening it.

Just my opinion after almost 50 years of T driving


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 11:40 am:

Yes, there are advocates for all the various linings, but I think Mark's advice is most important, no matter which lining is in the car. Slippage is the enemy of drums, because slippage means friction and friction means heat, and enough heat means breakage. When I step down on that low or reverse pedal, I know it's designed for the band to grab the drum "gradually", but that gradual grabbing (slippage) should be as brief as possible without stalling the engine, and when the pedal is down and the car has started to move, hold that pedal down HARD. I think most drum overheating isn't caused by the initial start, but by letting the drums slip while driving in reverse or low.

(Message edited by steve_jelf_parkerfield_ks on February 21, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 01:37 pm:

Kevlar is bulletproof as far as I'm concerned. (;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 02:20 pm:

Did someone say wood bands?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 02:52 pm:

The best bands are made of the byproduct of producing MMO...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 04:29 pm:

I have used Scandinavian Band linings, wood linings, and Kevlar. I will post below in chronological order my experience.
1. My first T was purchased in 1989, It had cotton bands. When I bought it, the low slipped and I had to use high to get home. My son got out and pushed me until I got rolling and then he jumped on the running board. One signal we were the first in line and got through just as it was turning red. I relined the bands with Scandinavian and I kept having to re-adjust them frequently. I even had to replace while on tours.
I replaced both the engine and transmission in 1991 and used wood bands. It had a different hogs head on it too. I have been driving it ever since with the wood bands. They rarely need adjustment. Only problem is the reverse tends to chatter, but the low is smooth. If I run the engine as slow as it will go without stalling and then push down hard on the reverse pedal and control the speed with the throttle it does not chatter, but if I slip the band it will chatter.

2. This car was restored in 2001 and has Kevlar bands. I have had no problems and use it on long tours as well as parades and short tours.

3. My third T has Kevlar bands. I had had a hard time getting a free neutral and cracked two low drums before I found out the cause of the problem. The low cam and low notch were worn out. When this happens, you will need to over tighten the band in order to get it to stop the drum 1 inch above the floor. This will cause a tight neutral and will also cause the band to drag all the time you are driving in high gear or neutral. The drum will overheat and crack. I replaced the shaft, low notch and low cam on this car. Since that time I have had no problem and still use Kevlar bands.

I think the cause of your problem is worn cams on one or both of your gears or brake. When the cams are in good condition, the band will be loose when the pedal is not being depressed which will give you a free neutral. When you begin to depress the pedal, the band will contract until it is tight. You should adjust so that the band is tight one to one and one half inch above the floorboard. Any tighter than that is too tight and will lead to dragging when in neutral. Either wood or Kevlar will give you long lasting band linings. Cotton or Scandinavian will give you softer lining and need adjustment or replacement more often.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 09:26 pm:

Look up "Guinn Wood bands", one year at a time. Here is a thread I posted in 2010 upon installing my Guinn Wood bands. After 8 years, they are still working great and I will never use anything else! Jim Patrick

www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/152825.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 11:08 pm:

I wonder when someone will get brave and buy some of the cement they use to bond brake pads to the metal of today's automobiles, think of it, no rivets,think of the torture the brakes are put through today, they freeze, get soaked, rode hard down hill over heated,the bonding process of this job may be the reason its not done.or perhaps no one has thought to do it. I'm at the time in life where the mind is still with it but the bones would rather let some one else do it.believe me if I were a few years ago, the sign would read---GERG'S BONDED BANDS, THEY SLIP IN WITH EASE.AND WILL LAST FOREVER,[IF YOU DON'T DRIVE YOUR CAR.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 11:29 pm:

I know of several people that have the hard woven lining used in industrial applications that are bonded to the bands. They have been running for many years and are(Clay drives his 26 coupe on most all our club tours)were(my friend Bill is no longer with us) regulars on our club tours.


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