Wish there was a show on real restoration / rebuilding

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Wish there was a show on real restoration / rebuilding
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 07:24 am:

Was just watching an episode of Garage Squad where they were fixing up a 1950s Cadillac Coupe. Not as old a car as I like, but better than watching another muscle car rebuild. The owners wanted it just like it was with the original ride so they could take it to car shows.

They cut out the suspension and put in an adjustable air suspension so they could drop the body to look like it’s almost dragging on the asphalt. They changed the wheels, the ignition and then applied hot rod pin striping on the body. They could have really rebuilt the original systems of the car and educated the viewer at the same time. Don’t get me wrong .. I love rethinking technology. My favorite show for that was Junkyard Wars ... too bad it’s gone.

Aside from reruns of the British show Wheeler Dealers it seems that all of these cable auto shows always seem to soup up original cars. I wish there was at least one show that shows thoughtful approaches to rebuilding or restoring cars featuring their original aesthetic and technology.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 08:01 am:

Chasing Classic Cars doesn't seem to modify cars, but the neither do they do a complete body off restoration. The show is more about flipping cars for a profit. I like watching it because they don't do a hot rod on every show.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 08:48 am:

Although it deals with Mopar muscle cars, Graveyard Cars is the show that deal with exactly what you are talking about.

I certainly can get into it having been a Mopar nut most of my life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 09:39 am:

Yes, the more modern cars are covered and that's good. But what about anything 1950s on back let alone 1920s? I once had a 1933 Plymouth PC rumble seat coupe. That sort of stuff is still being resurrected but the current shows would cut of a piece like that and paint it with metallic fleck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 10:21 am:

The reason that the car rebuild shows usually deal with the classic car era cars is a lot of the people that grew up with that era of cars are still around and now have the money to spend on them. That's where most of the money is being spent.
The folks that grew up in the Model T, Model A era are for the most part aren't here anymore. And besides the classic cars you usually can drive them at highway speeds. I can't see myself getting on on roads with cars flying by at 65-80 mph and me running along at 45 going downhill in my 24 Coupe.
I think I will stick to the back roads and be happy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 10:35 am:

There's something that all of us here have to consider and that is most folks, at least those that can afford it, want to drive their cars. With all the amenities of a modern to boot. That's the reason so many really oldies are just bodies sitting on modern running gear. I know my T's weren't street drivable where I live. Just a fact of life. Can't keep up, can't stop, absolutely no safety at all and the T doesn't lend itself to modernization very well. Besides in our world it becomes worthless if it's a resto mod (although you might notice they do sell). Face it gents: the 70's cars ARE old cars. Ours are wagons with motors. Scratch that, The wagons were safer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 10:47 am:

Something to consider, is that the current shows are mostly advertising for the parts and tool suppliers. I'm ok with our Ford T's, mostly because they are not mainstream.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 11:28 am:

You could buy the collection of DVD's and watch them any time. or! There are a number of videos on U-tube of people restoring there bits and pieces.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 11:50 am:

I was born at the beginning of the WW2 era and was privileged to have seen the T's and A's still on the streets because they were dependable and could run on kerosene and other flammable liquids in a pinch. They were safe then because the speeds were low and the were repairable with wrenches and a hammer. They also looked, to me, like they could anywhere. There were plows pulled by horses still and neighbors that helped each other shoveling snow. I don't have to go 80 MPH to get anywhere when there are trains and planes for that.
I love to work on our T and love to watch others work on their T's. Just my thoughts today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 01:37 pm:

I actually like to watch the Youtube videos of people pulling vintage cars out of barns ... WW II tanks out of rivers et.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 02:33 pm:

Well then Mark you may like the video where Bullwinkle pulls a rabbit out of his hat! :-):-):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Curtis Fesler on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 02:51 pm:

I get tired of watching them build muscle cars but I guess that's whats popular with the majority of viewers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 03:18 pm:

I'm hoping when I get my T project finished, it'll be worth as much as the wheels cost on those cars. Dave in Bellingham,WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 03:34 pm:

I can't remember the name of the show, and I have not seen it on TV for awhile now, but there was a guy by the name of Ian Rouselle (not sure of that spelling) and I enjoyed watching his show. He built a lot of weird stuff, but he worked like a lot of us, and was a master at building "something" out of just stuff he had laying around his shop, or in scrap piles, etc. I'm sure the shows were somewhat "scripted" as they all are, but he was a really "down-to-earth" regular guy that didn't "perform" for television, but just built things using cardboard templates and such for patterns and let his imagination dictate his "design & build" as you go along sort of technique. No stupid and phoney "soap opera" shop crew in-fighting,....just Ian & his dog. Sure wish I could remember the name of the show, however, there were only a dozen or so episodes, and they were replayed on TV several times,....FWIW,.....harold

P.S. My wife remembered the name of the show,....."Full Custom Garage"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 04:19 pm:

The owners wanted it original so they changed the suspension & wheels for the show. Umm... logic? i don't understand...

If i can't find a show on actual restoration i'll have to emulate one on youtube....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 07:03 pm:

While we're discussing the TV car shows in this thread.
The LA Classic Car Show is this weekend and the Convention Center. All your favorite restorer/customizer celebrities will be there. The Long Beach model T club has been invited again and given a sizable area at the show. Last year there was a lot of interest in our cars, I think mine was one of the oldest one there. Dave Kendig and our local HB Chip Foose both stopped by to check it out.

Looks like this year will be even bigger and better


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 07:12 pm:

Gene -- Those guys liked your car because it's a Hot Rod! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 07:13 pm:

What you're encountering might be called "The Reality TV Factor."

I'm going to speak from the point of view of a thirty some-odd year career in advertising (an area of endeavor which leans heavily on psychology) and a part-time career in live music (an area of endeavor which certainly makes the practitioner aware of his audience's tastes, likes and dislikes). -Some of you will think what I have to say is insulting or too general or even ignorant and that's fine; you're entitled to your opinion.

As you may have gathered from the AMC network's show, Mad Men, advertising was a specialized business science of fairly high stakes. -The loss of an important advertising client could start a domino effect as other clients would realize they might be investing heavily and irrevocably in a sinking ship. -I worked for one of those agencies which was dropped by so important a client that our remaining accounts saw that and took off for more secure environs, resulting in unavoidable layoffs of talented people possessed of insider information from our agency, who were then hired by the competition which exploited what they knew to deliver the coup de gras to the afflicted ad agency—and this kind of thing could happen so fast, sometimes in no more than a week, that those on the bottom end of the totem-pole were left stunned, disoriented—and unemployed. -The competition was nothing short of ferocious (and dirty), and from the moment you were tossed into that pool, it was either sink or swim—like a shark.

Now, once upon a time, your average Joe and Joanne were reasonably capable (thanks to The Great Depression), reasonably disciplined (thanks to WWII), reasonably educated (and could write something besides their signature in script), reasonably competitive (thanks to having played sports—but most kids of today have never swung a baseball bat or tossed a frisbee), reasonably informed and possessed of opinions which, though often differing, at least made some sort of logical sense. -To an extent, advertisers would categorize these folk according to their television viewing habits. -The really smart ones watched shows like The Twilight Zone and The Dick Van Dyke Show, and those of average gifting watched Get Smart and Gilligan's Island. -Marketing was targeted accordingly; Cadillacs for group A and Volkswagens for group B.

On the subject of education: I recently interviewed a small group of college kids with 4.0 grade point averages. -I asked, "Against whom did the United States fight during World War Two?"
They gave me a collective, bovine stare of total noncomprehension, so I offered, a hint, "Which nation bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941—a date which will live in infamy?"
"The British?"
"No. Try again."
"The French?"
"Nope."
"The South?"
Given the direction of west, they couldn't figure out which direction was north on the first shot. -None had ever heard of The Spirit of St. Louis and none knew what a pronoun was, let alone hyperbole, metaphor or simile. -Now, these kids weren't dumb; they were just poorly educated. -Oh, I'm sure they'd been taught all about political correctness and social justice, but not basic penmanship. -They hadn't been required to memorize multiplication tables and their grammar was non-existent, never having been taught how to diagram a sentence, and they couldn't write their way off a 3x5 index card.

At one time in American history, popular music included Big-Band Swing, the Rat-Pack vocalists, Elvis, The Beatles, all categories of Jazz, the type of music that would come to be known as Classic Rock, etc.—all existing at the same time! -We had writers like Stevie Wonder, Kris Kristofferson, Neil Diamond, Burt Bacharach, Joni Mitchell, Paul Simon, Carole King, Quincy Jones, Duke Ellington (and I could go on forever with this list). -Today's popular music scene is mostly a wasteland, and the songs sound mostly like the chants to which little kids used to jump rope. -While watching the last Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve, I just sat there, shaking my head at the floor over what was passing for music. -Who the heck is writing this refuse?

Okay—sorry about all of the above, but I needed to lay a little background. -The point is, through a shocking lack of basic education and a generous supply of sub-standard everything else, the Millennial Generation has become accustomed to being presented with second and third rate junk—junk on radio, junk on TV, junk in school, and don't get me started on the difference between today's thoroughly agendized newscasters and Walter Cronkite (who was so professional as to refrain from giving the slightest hint that he was a staunch liberal until after he retired from news broadcasting). -See, it's not the Millennial Generation's fault that they were never weaned off a steady diet of intellectual and emotional baby-food.

From the mid-1980s through the rest of the 20th Century and a little beyond, we had excellent TV programming on The Discovery Channel, The Arts & Entertainment Channel, The Learning Channel, The History Channel, and for motor-heads like us, there was The Speed Channel, but that was before broadcast execs got wind of the fact that the Millennial Generation would accept an inferior broadcast product that was basically unscripted and cheap as dirt to produce—"Reality TV"—so why waste money making good television? -Now, all those basic-cable channels are broadcasting junk. -Heck, I know of a bright young medical doctor who was obsessed with what Snooky was going to do this week on Jersey Shore!

Good shows got cancelled, but the worst piece of junk ever to be broadcast, The Jerry Springer Show, is still on the air and doing very nicely in the ratings, thank you. -Just for sad laughs, here are the first few lines on that show's website:
Do you want to be a guest on The Jerry Springer Show? -Did you have a child with a transsexual or are you pregnant by a transsexual? -Are you ready to turn up and get lit and confront somebody on the Jerry Springer Show? -Do you have a sexy job? -Do you want to break up or make up with your partner/spouse?

Good grief.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 07:23 pm:

Harold,
If you want to see a master craftsman building stuff from scratch, get a copy of the PBS DVD called "Ben's Mill".
It is a 1981 documentary about Ben Thresher who built stuff for farmers in rural Vermont using the machinery in a water powered mill that was originally built in 1848.
Talk about a fascinating trip into the past!

Mark,
I too liked the UK show "Junk Yard Wars".
They built some pretty creative machines, but I guess you could when the amazing junk yard they were based in was stocked with running motorcycles, cars and trucks, aeroplanes and even helicopters to scavenge parts off of!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 07:57 pm:

That was an amazing junk yard to say the least.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Finchum on Monday, February 26, 2018 - 10:46 pm:

I personally don't care for all the drama injected into these fix-it car shows for entertainment. Guys shouting, calling names, arguing, throwing things. I wouldn't let these folks work on my lawn mower. I just want to see the craftsmen doing the work, how they do it and explain it. But that's not sexy enough, so we get shows geared to 12 year olds, although i would expect more from a 12 year old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 01:09 am:

Funny thing is some animated shows produced by teenagers on YouTube are partly animated by 12y/o's and have better writing, scripts and charcter/story arcs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 08:39 am:

I don't watch most of the car building shows because I don't appreciate the language used. Most have to be bleeped every 15 seconds. A lot of the shows are obviously made for beer guzzling "tough" guy types. Anyone who enjoys them should have the right to watch what they like, but for me, no thanks. Just my opinion. No offence intended.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 09:24 am:

Fellas, we have a car restoration show unfolding right here. Every day is a new episode.
I tune in every day to see guys like me fixing and building stuff.
We are fortunate to have this show. Only difference is it costs us for each episode we produce.
Write your own script and show us what you got.
This is real reality.
Build em if you got em!
Don't forget the photos and how to's.

Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 06:40 pm:

Yeah, what Dallas said.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel Indiana Truck Logansport In on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 06:41 pm:

Steve Jelf has the best restoration show on this channel. I want to do my 1912 touring and post it from start to finish and need someone like Steve to hold the camera. I bet it would sell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 06:41 pm:

Wonder what's going on out in Kansas these days?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 06:46 pm:

Thanks Dallas ... that’s true. And yes, the more pictures the better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 11:41 pm:

I like your words Dallis.we are of a time when the restorations being done are of NO INTEREST TO MOST OF US,yes there is super talent out there however,its being wasted on newer stuff!the earlyest automobile I restored in my shop was a 1910 REO,complete every bolt and nut.I give her a bit more omph, by changing the cd on a new set of dome pistons,it came out sweet.there was Marmon's 1925 Bentley, Packard's JUST ONE 1915 t DEPOT HACK,FROM LEFTOVERS.THERE IS one of my job's I did 15 years ago on the tube,she is as lovely now as when she left my shop,type in Stutz #1871403,a bit ot, but its automotive.I did five Stutz.two for the same man.this 21 is I think the only seven pass left. HARRY STUTZ,was doing things to his engine's that were way ahead of there time.like twin cams four valves per,duel ignition,ect.


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