So really how does one true a wheel?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: So really how does one true a wheel?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 04:35 pm:

Hi, so I've read some threads on how to true a wheel but they seem vague to me on the actual mechanics such as what might you mount it on, etc? Do you more or less do it like a bicycle wheel?

Signed, confused but wanting to build wheels with my Regan spoke press in Houston.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 04:41 pm:

Good question. So far I haven't figured out how to eliminate all run-out. I want to see some answers on this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 05:56 pm:

Me too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 07:12 pm:

You let Johnson Wood Wheels do it. They build them true.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 08:42 pm:

I only re-build wood spoke wheels with the metal feloes. All other types are beyond my skill set. I made two simple fixtures that will hold a wood spoked wheel with a metal feloe so I can evaluate the run out. If the run out is small, less than 1/2, then I loosen the six bolts and hit the feloe with a large copper hammer. With a little careful work, it moves just a little. Then I re-tighten the bolts and check again. I usually get it within 1/8 which I consider just fine for Model T. speeds.

(Message edited by Tony_bowker on February 27, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 08:47 pm:

It's possible that your hub might be crooked. I have one which was untrue and I rotated the hub in the spokes and bolted it in again and it was straight.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 11:37 pm:

When I install the hub, it is very tight both on the feloe and on the hub. Therefore it is not possible to turn on the hub on my wheels without disassembling the entire wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Spadafore on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 09:22 am:

Tony: can you post photos of your fixture?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 10:23 am:

I was able to get a 1/2 inch wobble down to 1/8 inch by using shims under demountable rim bolts. Don't know if it's a recommended practice or not. I only drive around local nothing cross country so i figured it's ok.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 12:34 pm:

1. Make sure the outside plate on the hub is not bent.

2. Check rim on a flat surface and get as many imperfections out as possible. this requires the judicious use of heat and pressing or bending rim so it fits flat.

3. Make sure the edges of the spokes that go into the hub are smooth and as you are pressing them continue to wiggle spokes to ensure they "sit" evenly.

4. PRAY

5. any slight wobble may be corrected by adding shims under the rim bolts.
lots of elbow grease and good luck are required for this procedure to work


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 04:47 pm:

A few observations by the know-nothing newbie...

A tall, wooden-spoked wheel completely devoid of any run-out is a rarity.



If you're going to suffer from a bit of wheel run-out, it's better to have it in a rear wheel than a front wheel because a big enough wobble up front can induce an unpleasant shimmy.

If you have some amount of run-out on two wheels mounted to the same axle (hopefully the rear axle), they can occasionally synchronize and give you what feels like a tail-wagging shilly-shally, which, at higher cruising speeds, can really get your attention. -It's temporary, though, because the simple expedient of going around a corner de-synchronizes the wobble.

If you have a wobbly rear wheel, switching a left-rear wheel with a right-rear wheel may decrease the wobble, make it go away entirely, or, if you're not lucky, make it worse. -Since that's a very cheap, very simple thing to do, it's worth a shot.

A bit of wobble is part of the charm of driving one of these old cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Thursday, March 01, 2018 - 11:04 am:

I use a large disc of plywood that lays against the steel felloe. The plywood has a hole in the middle, to use as a guide for my router, which I use to slightly cut the face of the spokes that fit against the hub flange. This gets the spoke faces & the felloe in parallel planes. The wheel runs as true as a die. Just shimming the rim can create other problems, as the wheel itself is still wobbling and can cause balance issues at higher speeds. Also, the rim isn't seated properly on the felloe when you use shims.

(Yes, be sure your hub flange isn't bent, or cracked, as others caution!)


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