Help Straightening A Bent Crank

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Help Straightening A Bent Crank
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Emering on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 09:49 pm:

I've now removed the crank from my 1924 Touring.
It was bent towards the radiator apron and although it would engage, I could not crank start the car due to the crank rubbing on the apron and license plate bracket.
Can the crank be straightened without heating it up first?
Can I bend it in a vise?
Any help for a helpless newbie would be greatly appreciated!
Bent Crank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Frost on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 10:06 pm:

Find a tree fork and bend away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 10:22 pm:

Looks like some wear on it that needs to be built up with a welder and ground back down to size.
How is the bushing it fits in? About 3 bucks and a little time you can replace it while you have that crank out and it will make things alot less rattly.
But as far as bending,you should be able to bend that without heat.
If it were mine this is how I would do it.I would find a large vice on a heavy work table,put the straight part in the vice with the bent part and bend outside of the jaws,See pic,put a pipe on that bent section and push the way it needs to go.It may help to remove the spring so the pipe can go further down. And check often to see if you have went far enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 10:23 pm:

Gene,heating the crank wont hurt it,but where you do this will need to be solid. the vice would be best, just make shur the bench is no going to tip on you,get your self a hunk of pipe that's going to slide over the end that faces the engine, clamp the crank close to the curve with the handle facing up, heat the area on the lower half of the curve, [remove the spring,]heat that area good and red no need to over heat, some help here would make things much easy'r while some one is heating apply pressure to bring it back to shape. good luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 10:25 pm:

thanks Mark, I dont type fast enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 11:07 pm:

Mack's got it. That's how I did mine. No heat but a large vice & well anchored bench.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C west central, MN on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 12:29 am:

Yessss! Glad you got it out Gene!
These guys have it, just start honking on that little bugger until you have that upper section straightened out.
A little bit here and there to straighten it back out.
Dave's right about a tree or a some-such too! Use your imagination if the vise doesn't work out. :-)
On the subject of heat: Way back when, I needed to make an extended crank for my starter-less '24 to clear a radiator as I didn't have a real model T radiator yet.
I used a piece of 3/4" cold rolled and heated it HOT in the right places, made the bends and to this day I still don't like the short "curves" of the "HOT bent" T starting crank. It worked tho. Just looked at it behind me on the wall.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 10:40 am:

A lot easier using "heat" to re-position to the original shape, if available and ditto on Cole's comment regarding the c.c. bushing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 11:02 am:

I agree, you can bend it cold but hot is easier. It's best to have a helper to keep it red while you bend it, but you can do it yourself if you use a big enough tip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 01:38 pm:

The tree thinking is a good one but I would drill a hole in the tree size for size push the end of the crank in and a big pipe on the other end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 11:38 am:

why kill a tree, go to a light pole that has a hole allready in it, cold bending in most case's ends up with a new bend where its not wanted.been there done that.your bend portion will go back to shape where it's been heated,no where else.the trick, just enough heat to do the job,one don't need to turn the steel beond a good red glow,while working it back in shape.[many years talking]


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 03:44 pm:

I usually find a spot on my trailer tongue to hold one end, then a BIG wrench or piece of pipe for leverage on the other end. Lot of leverage, no chance of flipping the trailer, and I haven't damaged the tongue yet. Sometimes a C-clamp or two to help hold steady.


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