From The Ridiculous To The sublime

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: From The Ridiculous To The sublime
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 09:39 pm:

This photo was taken on a tour to Marysville, California, a while ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 09:42 pm:

Interesting comparison, but can you hand crank it if the battery is dead ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 09:45 pm:

Ever hear of a jet engine "cart" (cartridge) start? That's as close as you'll get to cranking the SR 71. Worked on them many moons ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 10:31 pm:

Two Black Birds?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Thursday, March 01, 2018 - 12:20 am:

Yes, the SR-71 used a "start cart". But unlike most other jet engines, the J-58's were directly cranked by the start cart. The cart was positioned beneath the engine and a vertical shaft reached up into the nacelle to spin the engine.

We had a couple of SR's at a place were I used to work. I was pretty jaded and usually didn't bother to watch when a jet started up. But the SR's were a different story. The airplane itself wasn't what interested me; it was the start cart. Each cart was powered by either a pair of Buick V-8's or a pair of big block Chevy's. Nothing quite like hearing the starter spinning up the jet engines. The Buicks had straight pipes and were so loud that you could still hear them after the jets were running.

You can hear the SR-71 start cart spinning up one of the J-58's here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjdyQpEUYzI


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Thursday, March 01, 2018 - 04:50 pm:

One engine of the SR-71 produced more power than the Queen Elizabeth II ocean liner... When a Russian SAM was fired in the vicinity of an SR-71 the pilot would push the throttles forward and OUTRUN IT. Designed by Kelly Johnson at the Skunk Works, by slide rule. What a fabulous bird.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rodney Gifford on Thursday, March 01, 2018 - 05:48 pm:

A little background on the SR71....The last US Military flight of the SR-71 originated from Palmdale, California, and flew to Washington-Dulles International Airport outside of Washington, DC. It was piloted by Lt Col Ed Yielding, USAF, with Lt Col Joseph Vida serving as Reconnaissance Systems Officer. On its last flight the SR-71 set a record time from Los Angeles, CA, to Washington, DC, of 1 hour, 4 minutes and 20 seconds. The SR-71 averaged a speed of 2,124 mph.

I am proud to say Col. Yielding is from our hometown of Florence, Al .....and we have one of the Planes on display in Huntsville, Al at the US Space and Rocket Center, where they have Space Camp for the kids.

Rod


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Thursday, March 01, 2018 - 06:31 pm:

I was in the service at a Nike Hercules site in the S.F. bay area in the late 60's. One flew over us twice, all planned well ahead. First fly over had it jumping across our surveillance radar screen like nothing I'd ever witnessed. Second trip, same path, altitude and speed and we watched him on surveillance until he got just to our max effective range on our missiles. Then he just disappeared, didn't matter what we did with our radar, we knew where he was from the prior run but couldn't see anything until he had passed over and exceeded our effective missile range and turned off his "stuff". Most impressive piece of weaponry that I encountered for speed, altitude and ECM capability.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Thursday, March 01, 2018 - 10:35 pm:

The KC-135 also had a "cart" (cartridge) start. We had a powder charge in the nose of I believe #3. After 3 started we brought it to full power to get pressure to start 1, 2, and 4. We could get all 4 going and would be taxiing in just a few minutes. I retired from the Air Force in 72 so some of the details have faded.


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