Old photo..Highland Park in 1910

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old photo..Highland Park in 1910
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Humphrey on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 10:43 am:

Well that's what the caption says....1910







Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Cress on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 11:55 am:

Dynamometer testing?! How did they keep up with production demands if they tested every engine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 12:40 pm:

Babbitt bearing burn-in. It was done on every engine. The meters in the background indicated motor current draw and probably voltage. The engines were spun until the meter dropped to a certain current draw. Typically, they were smoking by then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 01:03 pm:

Appears to be a later date than 1910. Maybe 1913 or so. The engines are closed valve and seem to have Kingston 4-ball brass carburetors on them like this one.



Great photo I believe we have seen before. If there is a higher resolution available, please post.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 01:42 pm:

my burn in mach runs off of a line. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 03:40 pm:

Ford was burnishing the engines right into the V8's of the 1930's.
It was stated on another thread not long ago that after the engine was run in, it would motor the electric motor to generate back into the power plant grid for the factory, I've never seen any evidence of that in photo's or film clips. No electricals, water or fuel connected.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 09:11 am:

Where did that photo come from? That engine is a 1913, and appears to have been dropped at some point. It looks like the crankcase could be the style right after the tea cup. Not all the bolts appear to be tight, and none have cotter pins!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 09:44 am:

Steve,I say thank you for your picture!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lew Morrill on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:39 am:

I can only imagine that lead poisoning was pretty rampant among the workers in this department. They probably carried a lot home too as the babbitt burnishing smoke permeated their clothes. As late as the mid 1970's lead issues were not well addressed in manufacturing, or at least they weren't in the manufacturing plant I worked in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:43 am:

Lew,

I don't believe there's any lead in babbitt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John E Cox on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:52 am:

Ford Babbitt was tin based. Only trace elements of lead if any.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 12:10 pm:

Larry, notice the painted aluminum crank handle!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 03:31 pm:

True, no lead but TIN poisoning is just as bad!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 08:03 pm:

According to the Henry Ford Trade School non-ferrous metallurgy Chart Babbitt could have a maximum of 0.10 max lead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 11:23 pm:

According to the Henry Ford Trade School non-ferrous metallurgy Chart Babbitt could have a maximum of 0.10 max lead.


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