Engine oil seepage?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Engine oil seepage?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 12:24 pm:

Short of a engine rebuild is there anything that can be done for engine oil seepage? There doesn't seem to be a specific location of leak and/or how would I locate it as it seems diffuse? -- IV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 12:54 pm:

Drip pan under the car. :-)

If you want to find the source, clean up the engine and chassis really well, then let the car sit a while with a clean piece of cardboard under it. When you find where the oil is dripping from, follow the trail up to its source.

Think of it as liquid rustproofing for the chassis. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 12:55 pm:

Generally the best answer is they all seep oil, water, suck air,have blow by, etc, etc....

Unless the vehicle has sat a long time and gaskets have dried out, just check the levels daily.

Short of pulling the engine and replacing the gaskets and seals - it is normal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 01:02 pm:

Mine leaks like a sieve. The colder it is the more it leaks. At 14 deg F, it is almost pouring out.

I park on cardboard, and never park in my driveway.

I think the best way to fix it, is to remove the various components, install a new gasket, and apply a gasket sealant to both surfaces.

Good Luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 01:20 pm:

That's how you know it's a real Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Heavner on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 01:30 pm:

They mark their territory. If you are on a tour and get behind, just follow the oil drips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 03:53 pm:

Several years back the Rocky Mountain T club and the Montana 500 run spent several days in White Sulfur Springs, MT. Something like 35 or 40 T's. On the last day I went in to NAPA to get some oil and ran into several other T guys getting oil. The gal behind the counter said she had never sold so much oil in her life!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 03:54 pm:

Now THAT'S funny, I don't care who you are!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 04:17 pm:

It's quite easy to get the gaskets to stop leaking. Use some gasket sealer. Wipe the area clean, and find the leak. Then wipe clean and force some sealer into the crack. The hard part is the seals. The seals weren't like our modern seals and the only real seal is the one in front crankshaft. It was made of felt. The Model A seal is rope and works a bit better. There were no seals where the pedal shafts go through the hogs head and they can be fitted with o rings, but anything tight interferes with the return of the pedals, so you need to be sure they return when not depressed. There is no seal around the universal joint ball. Only a tight cover sometimes a shim will help. If the ball cap bearing is loose, more oil leaks. Packing the universal joint with heavy grease will slow down the leaking. But anyway you will almost always have some oil leaking out.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Smith on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 05:05 pm:

If it not leaking, there's none in it. Couldn't help myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 05:06 pm:

Ignacio,there is another beloved mechanical cockroach name Harley,that is of the oil self changing type,if you can develop gasket's that work for the t,with its cast surface's that are fairly close to mating,you could not spend the interest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 05:12 pm:

David, I actually remember being on a tour and a couple of us got lost. We found lots of oil at an intersection and it got us back on track.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Williams, Hillsboro Oregon on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 10:10 pm:

My theory is if the T is leaking oil it means you still have some. When it stops leaking oil, then you worry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, March 02, 2018 - 10:20 pm:

If it's loose, tighten it;
if it creaks, oil it;
if it squeaks, grease it;
if it scrapes, shim it;
if it rattles, adjust it;
if it's wet, wipe it;
if it's dry, polish it;
if it drips... well, it's supposed to drip; leave that alone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C west central, MN on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 12:02 am:

Hehehehe! All responses are nearly true! :-)
Perhaps hose the "suspected areas" down with brake cleaner or some-such, go for a spin and look for the trail of oil.
Hose that area down again, dry it and slather some Ultra-Black or what-have-you on that spot, let it dry and try again. :-)
Rinse and repeat. :-)
Front lower corners of the hogs head are notorious leakers in my Tiny T'd world.

In Two Thousand Fifteen, I changed the main clutch pack in my 24 WITHOUT removing the unit-powerplant (the engine) from the chassis.
(Cursed rebel!)
The hogs head was off as I did a band job at that time too.
I loosened the pan to block bolts, removed the rear bolts and lifted the rear of the engine-transmission up enough to allow the "main clutch cover"
(nomenclature-I'm not going to look for the correct term right now) to clear the pan bolt protrusions and slip off the stub shaft so I could get at the clutch pack/plates and change it out.
It doesn't leak any more or any less than before I did that! :-)
No wait. I DID need to re-do the hogs head lower front corners as it went potty like crazy. I didn't get the felts right.
I cleaned the areas up and pasted some Ultra Black into the offending areas. Presto!
Now it leaks only as intended!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 12:56 am:

Check out these two threads. Jim Patrick

www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/822076/831608.html
www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/313252.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer --- Klaaswaal NL on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 06:25 am:

IGNACIO ; I always put some extra sealer on the outside , also in the corner of the Hogshead and Engine block .
Toon
377M
378M


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 07:04 am:

That's what I do too. Run some Ultra Black in the gaps. It keeps the leakage down to a tolerable level. When your oil starts costing you more than your gas, it's time to do this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 08:56 am:

In addition above, make sure all the pan to hogshead and engine block are tight.

I had some pretty good leaks going on mine, I sealed up the side valve covers, pulled the hogs head and reasealed along with the bendix cover, resealed the 4th main to pan/hogs head, and finally front cover and upper piece of the front crank seal. It still leaked, albeit much less, come to find out I had some block to oil pan bolts that were not tight. I simply tightened them up (No new sealer) and it eliminated almost all the rest of the leaking (aside from the normal T leaks).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 09:38 am:

Model T's were leaking when they were new and being shown at the dealerships. If you look close at the old dealership photos you usually can see the dark spots on the floors just under the T's.

When Chad M made the statement about simply tightening the bolts thats what I eventually did. Stopped a lot of leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, March 03, 2018 - 04:08 pm:

Yes to have an engine leak is a pain. But a true T'er finds a way to extend the aggravation.

Note the efficient use of card board.


from Model T Ford Register of Great Britain


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