How to remove gas tank from Centerdoor?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: How to remove gas tank from Centerdoor?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Sunday, March 04, 2018 - 08:31 am:

We are working on a 1922 Centerdoor. We’ve discovered considerable sediment and rust in the gas tank and determined it must be cleaned before this car will run smoothly and reliably. We’ve ordered the supplies to clean and reseal the tank which should be here tomorrow.

Late yesterday afternoon as I was wrapping things up in the shop, I rolled under the Centerdoor to survey the scene and get an idea of what it would take to remove the tank. Unfortunately, the underside of the tank is concealed with the floor boards and I was too tired to start investigating further.

The square tank is under the driver’s seat. What is involved with removing the tank?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Sunday, March 04, 2018 - 10:17 am:

Eric,

You may be able to get the tank out of the seat by taking the bottom seat cushion and frame off. I have removed the entire front seat with the tank included.

Good Luck,
Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Sunday, March 04, 2018 - 10:41 am:

Eric, I have the same car, so you'll have to remove the entire front seat including the metal base frame to get the tank out. The metal frame has wood screws around the bottom, which screw into the carpet. The tank will come out with the seat assm. Just as Terry mentioned above.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Friday, March 09, 2018 - 08:14 pm:

Well, I removed the gas tank from the Center Door this evening. It was a simple job.

First, I removed the screws holding the base of the seat to the floor board. They were easy to get to by simply pulling up the carpeting edge. There were a total of 12 screws and they were on the back, center, and front (no screws along the side by the door).



Once the screws were removed, I drained the tank. I had to snake a wire up through the petcock on the bottom of the sediment bulb to dislodge the sediment. The next pics show the sediment that drained from the gas tank and collected in the bottom of the jugs.






Next, I removed the gas line from the sediment bulb.

Then I lifted the seat and seat frame off from the gas tank exposing the tank.



The tank was completely free of any obstructions or impediments, so I easily lifted it out of the Center Door.

I removed the sediment bulb and had a little fun scraping out the rusty sediment that was impeding fuel flow and clogging the carburetor.




Below are pics of the inside of the tank. I will be using the tank restoration kit/chemicals to see if we can salvage this thing.










Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Friday, March 09, 2018 - 08:34 pm:

I would think twice about spending any time attempting to restore that tank - knarly !!!

I have a '19 Centerdoor and after having a small gas leak - cracked solder on a seam but smelled like it was huge - I ordered a new tank !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Kirtley on Friday, March 09, 2018 - 08:45 pm:

New tank! You don’t want that gasoline smell in a closed car. Ask me how I know. Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Friday, March 09, 2018 - 08:53 pm:

The tank on this 22 Center Door is solid and has no leaks. It is just rusty and gunky.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Friday, March 09, 2018 - 09:11 pm:

Good luck with your project !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 03:49 pm:

I just wanted to follow up with an update on the removal, restoration, sealing ,and reinstallation of the gas tank.

First, the removal of the tank proved to be far less of a challenge than I was imagining. See the comments above about the removal process.

Next, I removed the gas line from the sediment bulb on the underside of the tank. Nothing else, other than the gas line, the floor of the car, and the seat pedestal/frame held the tank in place. At that point, it was easy to lift out of the car.

I then followed the instructions for cleaning, degreasing, derusting, and resealing the tank that were on the jugs of chemicals I purchased from Langs (Gas Tank Restoration Kit - Part Number GAS-TRK). I was amazed at the amount of sediment that came out of that tank. It is no wonder that the car was running so horribly.

I allowed the tank restoration chemicals/process to work over a period of days. Aside from a fair amount of effort necessary to slosh the chemicals around inside of the tank (I never managed to set up an efficient way to mechanically swoosh things around), it was not overly burdensome.

Once the tank was cleaned, decreased, and resealed, it looked marvelous. It was nice and shiny. No more debris rattled around inside. The restoration was definitely needed, and the restoration kit cured the problem for now. Only time will tell whether the cure will endure.

BTW, we also removed and replaced the weeping sediment bulb and pet cock. I worked on them for a bit and hoped that they could be salvaged, but I couldn’t get them to stop the incessant dripping, so we opted to play it safe (especially since we are dealing with gas and gas fumes) and just go with new items. No more drips or gas odors in the garage.

Thanks for the tips above.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 05:08 pm:

I had to do two '26 gas tanks due to crust and nastiness inside. I use 100 1" concrete nails and tumbled the heck out of it once it was dry and fume-free. Then used one of the gas tank cleaner/sealer kits. Two years later my fuel runs clean and don't have to drain out my sediment bowl as frequently. Definitely a pain in the rear, but the results were worth it.


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